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glazing very large bowls

updated fri 23 feb 07

 

Judy Musicant on tue 13 feb 07


Hello Potters,

I've made several bowls about 19" by 6". I need to dip them in a =
container to glaze the outsides. Any recommendations on containers for =
glazing such large items.?

By the way, these bowls were commissioned by a day spa to use at their =
pedicure stations. I'm told it is quite the thing for high end spas. =
Might be a good marketing idea for those of you who enjoy making bowls =
of this size. It's been a great excercise for me - not sure I'd want to =
do it on a regular basis though. Now, to get through the drying and =
firing process without a disaster!

Thanks for any input on glaze containers.

Judy Musicant
pottersguildnj.org

Roy Odom on tue 13 feb 07


If you go to a restaurant surplus supply house they sometimes have the large
bowls (up to 36" in diameter) used for food prep. They are round bottomed so
it requires making a short table our of plywood and 2x4 with a hole cut out
in the middle to make it usable. They are wonderful.

Roy B. Odom

Stonecreek Studio Pottery





>From: Judy Musicant
>Reply-To: Clayart
>To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>Subject: Glazing very large bowls
>Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2007 09:28:37 -0500
>
>Hello Potters,
>
>I've made several bowls about 19" by 6". I need to dip them in a container
>to glaze the outsides. Any recommendations on containers for glazing such
>large items.?
>
>By the way, these bowls were commissioned by a day spa to use at their
>pedicure stations. I'm told it is quite the thing for high end spas. Might
>be a good marketing idea for those of you who enjoy making bowls of this
>size. It's been a great excercise for me - not sure I'd want to do it on a
>regular basis though. Now, to get through the drying and firing process
>without a disaster!
>
>Thanks for any input on glaze containers.
>
>Judy Musicant
>pottersguildnj.org
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>melpots@pclink.com.

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Vince Pitelka on tue 13 feb 07


Judy Musicant wrote:
"I've made several bowls about 19" by 6". I need to dip them in a container
to glaze the outsides. Any recommendations on containers for glazing such
large items?"

Judy -
Of course you could pour the glaze on the inside and slosh it around, and
then spray the outside. Or, to glaze the outside, you could set the bowl
upside-down on some thin wood runners in a wide pan or catchbasin (easily
improvised from a tarp) and simply pour the glaze at the foot all the way
around the bowl so that it flows down and runs off the rim.

If you want to dip the bowls, an ideal container for glazing large platters
and bowls is a large commercial wok. Big Asian markets often sell Asian
restaurant equipment. I have a 36" restaurant wok, but was lucky to get it
for very cheap at a flea market. I set mine on a table and pour four or
five gallons of glaze into it, and I have used it to glaze bowls 24" in
diameter, and it would work for much larger bowls. Spread your finger tips
of each hand along the outside of the rim of the bowl on opposite edges, and
pick up the bowl. If it's too heavy to do that, you'll have to grasp the
bowl with your hands on opposite edges of the rim. In either case, you
simply dip one edge of the bowl into the glaze so that it is immersed from
the rim to the center of the bottom in that one spot, and then simply tilt
the bowl around so that the same thing happens all the way around the bowl
and the entire surface is glazed inside and out. It's hard to describe, but
if you just try it you'll see how it works right away. It's the only way
you can dip-glaze large platters and bowls with a relatively small amount of
glaze.
Good luck -
- Vince

Vince Pitelka
Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee Technological University
Smithville TN 37166, 615/597-6801 x111
vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu
http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/
http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/

Chris Groat on tue 13 feb 07


I usually just wax the bottom of the large bowl or platter. I flip it
upside down and hold it away from my body with the palm of my hand inside
the bowl. This can be very hard if the bowl is heavy. Because of the size
of the bowl you have to keep your arm pretty straight, which can be hard.
Then I just pour the glaze around one half of the bowl, rotate, and pour
the glaze on the other half. Gravity keeps the glaze from getting inside
the bowl. My five gallon glaze bucket catches the run-off, but it takes
practice. It's easy to miss the bucket. Depending on which glaze I use,
the overlap usually looks pretty good. If you need a nice uniform layer I
guess you'll have to find a large basin.

Chris

Hank Murrow on tue 13 feb 07


> I glaze my big (to 30" square) slabs over a wheelbarrow, pouring the
> glaze back into the 30 gallon plastic tubs when done.

Cheers, Hank
www.murrow.biz/hank

Allyson May on wed 14 feb 07


Folks have suggested large containers from restaurant supply companies =
but if you live near a farmers co-op or feed supply there is a cheaper =
solution. Most farm supply places sell large rubber feed bowls for =
small livestock. They come in a variety of sizes, some of which are =
more than large enough for your project. They have a nice flat bottom, =
low profile and are easy to clean. They will also flex a little bit so =
its easy to return the glaze to the original bucket when done. I have =
several sizes and they work great!
Peace,
Allyson May
Stoney Creek Pottery
Bloomington, IN
Where we got 3" of snow then 1/2" of ice then 3 more inches of snow!

Lee Love on wed 14 feb 07


On 2/13/07, Judy Musicant wrote:

> Thanks for any input on glaze containers.

I pour glaze temporarily from the trash can into a plastic wash
basin to glaze platters in. Pour the glaze back into the trash can
when I am done.

--
Lee in Mashiko, Japan
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
http://potters.blogspot.com/

"To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts." -
Henry David Thoreau

"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi

Lee Love on wed 14 feb 07


With Shimaoka's largest platters, two deshi's worked together, one
holding and another pouring. First, the inside is glazed. When
that dries to touch, then the holder holds the platter upside with a
hand inside at the bottom, turning the platter with the other hand.
Any glaze drips or overruns are thinned with a kana (japanese trimming
tool.) Run-off goes int a wash basin.

Takes some practice. 19" isn't really that big. I would just
dip them, unless you don't make enough glaze to do this.

--
Lee in Mashiko, Japan
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
http://potters.blogspot.com/

"To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts." -
Henry David Thoreau

"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi

Lisa E on wed 14 feb 07


Rubbermaid containers and litter boxes work well. Lisa

On 2/14/07, Allyson May wrote:
>
> Folks have suggested large containers from restaurant supply companies but
> if you live near a farmers co-op or feed supply there is a cheaper
> solution. Most farm supply places sell large rubber feed bowls for small
> livestock. They come in a variety of sizes, some of which are more than
> large enough for your project. They have a nice flat bottom, low profile
> and are easy to clean. They will also flex a little bit so its easy to
> return the glaze to the original bucket when done. I have several sizes and
> they work great!
> Peace,
> Allyson May
> Stoney Creek Pottery
> Bloomington, IN
> Where we got 3" of snow then 1/2" of ice then 3 more inches of snow!
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>



--
Lisa E
Sunny Daze Design Pottery Studio
SunnyDazeDesign@gmail.com
Squamish, BC Canada

www.lisaelbertsen.com http://picasaweb.google.com/SunnyDazeDesign

David Berg on wed 14 feb 07


An inexpensive method:

Find a sturdy cardboard box of the appropriate size. Line it with a
new 36 gal. +
plastic trash bag. After you are done, the glaze pours out and what
little
is left, beads up on the trash bag so there's not much cleanup involved.

David Berg
dberg2@comcast.net
http://bergstoneware.com/

On Feb 13, 2007, at 9:28 AM, Judy Musicant wrote:

> Hello Potters,
>
> I've made several bowls about 19" by 6". I need to dip them in a
> container to
> glaze the outsides. Any recommendations on containers for glazing
> such large items.?
> ... ...

Alistair Gillies on thu 15 feb 07


For large plates Mary Wondrausch recommends an upturned metal dustbin lid
resting on a bucket - I haven't tried it but I would like to find one [we
have gone over to wheelie bins].

Alistair
Ironbridge Gorge, England


----- Original Message -----
From: "Lee Love"
> For really big stuff, a children's plastic swimming pool works great.
>
> --
> Lee in Mashiko, Japan

Jacqui Kruzewski on thu 15 feb 07


I did write to the list with this suggestion but it never got through 1st
time. But I have tried it and it works very well. Plastic dustbin lids work
just as well Alistair - and are easily available still.

I was advised (by Bev Bell-Hughes) to stand a turntable / banding wheel, in
the centre of the upturned lid. You can place a biscuit tin on top of the
turntable if you need extra height. Pad the surface on which the upturned
bowl will rest (foam or similar to avoid damage and keep it steady). rotate
slowly while pouring the glaze evenly.

Runoff glaze collects in the dustbin lid and can be poured back into the
glaze bucket with ease.

Jacqui
North wales

>For large plates Mary Wondrausch recommends an upturned metal dustbin lid
>resting on a bucket - I haven't tried it but I would like to find one [we
>have gone over to wheelie bins].
>
>Alistair
>Ironbridge Gorge, England
>

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Carole Fox on thu 15 feb 07


For large shallow bowls and platters, I use the bottom tray for a large
plastic flowerpot- available for cheap at a garden supply shop.
Carole Fox
Silver Fox Pottery
Elkton, MD
silverfoxpottery@comcast.net

Susan Fox Hirschmann on thu 15 feb 07


I bought a cement mixer larger plastic tray (it is about 28-30" x 18" x 8"
deep) at a hardware store.It works great for big pieces.
Best of luck,
Susan
Annandale, VA

Lee Love on thu 15 feb 07


For really big stuff, a children's plastic swimming pool works great.

--
Lee in Mashiko, Japan
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
http://potters.blogspot.com/

"To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts." -
Henry David Thoreau

"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi

Carole Fox on fri 16 feb 07


On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 13:38:55 +0000, Jacqui Kruzewski
wrote:


>I was advised (by Bev Bell-Hughes) to stand a turntable / banding wheel,
in
>the centre of the upturned lid. You can place a biscuit tin on top of the
>turntable if you need extra height. Pad the surface on which the upturned
>bowl will rest (foam or similar to avoid damage and keep it steady).
rotate
>slowly while pouring the glaze evenly.
>

I have used this method, but find it takes too much time to clean the
turntable. What works better is to place the turntable under the catch
basin, and use a simple cylindrical form such as a cottage cheese carton
(with padding on top) roughly centered inside the basin to suspend the
bowl. Multiple cartons can be stacked if needed to get more height, and
other types of cylindrical forms can certainly be used as the platform for
holding the bowl. I like the plastic cartons because the force from
weight of the bowl tends to create a bit of suction that keeps the carton
from shifting around. When I'm finished, I can just throw the carton
away, or if I want to keep it, it's much easier to clean than a turntable.

Carole Fox
Dayton, OH

Gayle Bair on fri 16 feb 07


I've used a plastic snow sled in the same manner as the dustbin described
below.
Gayle Bair
Tucson AZ.


-----Original Message-----
On Feb 15, 2007, at 3:59 AM, Alistair Gillies wrote:

> For large plates Mary Wondrausch recommends an upturned metal
> dustbin lid resting on a bucket snip>
> Alistair
> Ironbridge Gorge, England

Eleanora Eden on sat 17 feb 07


I have several heavy plastic bins I got at the big hardware store.
They're 24" x 36" x 9" high, big enough for anything I need to glaze.

Once upon a time I had a round plastic bin about 25" across and 2' deep.
It was perfect for large pieces. Haven't seen one in a long time but I still keep
my eye out.

Eleanora......we finally got snow, and then some!


>Often feed stores or farm stores have affordable large containers.
>Gail Dapogny in cooooold, snowy Ann Arbor, Michigan (US)

--
Bellows Falls Vermont
www.eleanoraeden.com

Jennifer Boyer on thu 22 feb 07


I just got some 5.00/ea 20+ inch wide shallow round bins at Big Lots.
They have handle holes , but are a GOOD size for wide forms. These
type of things used to be widely available at the big chains, but no
more!
Jennifer
On Feb 17, 2007, at 8:21 AM, Eleanora Eden wrote:

> I have several heavy plastic bins I got at the big hardware store.
> They're 24" x 36" x 9" high, big enough for anything I need to glaze.
>
> Once upon a time I had a round plastic bin about 25" across and 2'
> deep.
> It was perfect for large pieces. Haven't seen one in a long time
> but I still keep
> my eye out.
>
> Eleanora......we finally got snow, and then some!
>
>
>> Often feed stores or farm stores have affordable large containers.
>> Gail Dapogny in cooooold, snowy Ann Arbor, Michigan (US)
>
> --
> Bellows Falls Vermont
> www.eleanoraeden.com
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
> ________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.

*****************************
Jennifer Boyer
Thistle Hill Pottery
Montpelier, VT
http://thistlehillpottery.com
*****************************