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presenters for a potters council conference

updated tue 28 nov 06

 

Susan Cline on tue 21 nov 06


Nan -- Sandy Miller, near Cleveland OH, is a master of ^6 electric
firing.
www.sandymillerpottery.com

(Sandy, if you are reading and have no interest in presenting a
workshop -- I'm sorry. Your work is too good and your "method" is so
admirable, and possibly accessible for all us ^6 electric firers.)

Sue Cline
Cincinnati, OH

On Nov 21, 2006, at 5:59 PM, Nan Rothwell wrote:

> I'm helping arrange future Potters Council Conferences, and in that
> role, I
> am asking the ClayArt group for some advice. If you could please send
> your
> answers to the list keeping the subject line "Presenters for a Potters
> Council Conference," I will be grateful. Time is really tight these
> days,
> and I often don't find time to read through the full ClayArt digest.
>
> The Potters Council is hoping to host a (or perhaps several) regional
> conference focussed on different kinds of firing. A tentative summary
> of
> the conference might read something like "
>
> The conference will focus on different firing options available to
> potters.
> This will be especially useful conference for anyone trying to decide
> about
> acquiring a kiln and/or branching out into a new firing technique. This
> conference will allow attendees to move from their comfort zone and
> learn
> new ways of firing and glazing. The selected presenters are experienced
> potters who will focus on one particular firing method. The
> presenters will
> provide general information (facts, figures, special materials,
> relative
> expense, wear factors, merits and liabilities, discuss firing cycles,
> kiln
> log pages, recipes for clay bodies and slips, suggestions for
> developing
> both, etc) about firing method along with demonstration of throwing or
> handbuilding techniques that work best with the firing method.
> Discussion
> will center on the following types of firings: Low Fire, Salt Fire,
> Wood
> Fire, Raku Fire, Reduction Firing, and Oxidation.
>
> Okay, now I have two questions for you.
> First, Can you suggest names of people you feel would be great
> presenters
> for such a conference? The conferences are regional in nature, but
> since we
> may well host more than one event with a similar theme, your
> suggestions can
> be from anywhere. WE seem to have come up with quite a few names of
> people
> to cover the wood, salt/soda and reduction aspects. So I am especially
> interested in people who can present on low fire and oxidation.
>
> Second, does this sound like a good idea for a conference theme? Is it
> something you might like to attend? (This is by way of unscientific
> market
> research on my part...)
>
> Thanks!
> Have a great Thanksgiving!
> Nan
> --
> Nan Rothwell
> NanRothwellPottery.com
>
> _______________________________________________________________________
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>

Nan Rothwell on tue 21 nov 06


I'm helping arrange future Potters Council Conferences, and in that role, I
am asking the ClayArt group for some advice. If you could please send your
answers to the list keeping the subject line "Presenters for a Potters
Council Conference," I will be grateful. Time is really tight these days,
and I often don't find time to read through the full ClayArt digest.

The Potters Council is hoping to host a (or perhaps several) regional
conference focussed on different kinds of firing. A tentative summary of
the conference might read something like "

The conference will focus on different firing options available to potters.
This will be especially useful conference for anyone trying to decide about
acquiring a kiln and/or branching out into a new firing technique. This
conference will allow attendees to move from their comfort zone and learn
new ways of firing and glazing. The selected presenters are experienced
potters who will focus on one particular firing method. The presenters will
provide general information (facts, figures, special materials, relative
expense, wear factors, merits and liabilities, discuss firing cycles, kiln
log pages, recipes for clay bodies and slips, suggestions for developing
both, etc) about firing method along with demonstration of throwing or
handbuilding techniques that work best with the firing method. Discussion
will center on the following types of firings: Low Fire, Salt Fire, Wood
Fire, Raku Fire, Reduction Firing, and Oxidation.

Okay, now I have two questions for you.
First, Can you suggest names of people you feel would be great presenters
for such a conference? The conferences are regional in nature, but since we
may well host more than one event with a similar theme, your suggestions can
be from anywhere. WE seem to have come up with quite a few names of people
to cover the wood, salt/soda and reduction aspects. So I am especially
interested in people who can present on low fire and oxidation.

Second, does this sound like a good idea for a conference theme? Is it
something you might like to attend? (This is by way of unscientific market
research on my part...)

Thanks!
Have a great Thanksgiving!
Nan
--
Nan Rothwell
NanRothwellPottery.com

Lee Burningham on tue 21 nov 06


Nan,=20

There are bounteous numbers of potters doing the low-fire oxidation
route of firing with their pots by necessity. Alex Solla, Trumansburg,
New York, does low-fire oxidation in electric kilns by design and would
be a wonderful presenter for a regional conference.=20

Lee Burningham

Lee Love on wed 22 nov 06


On 11/22/06, Nan Rothwell wrote:
>
. So I am especially
> interested in people who can present on low fire and oxidation.

For an alternative approach, you might look at John Kantar:

http://www.handmadepots.com/

I attended a presentation of his after he was fresh back
from Baniff. He was experimenting in cone 1 earthenware in soda, in
a climbing kiln Linda Christenson built. The earthenware he used
was vitreous at cone 1 (I think it was terracotta from Continental
Clay, but i am not positive.) He retired from teaching ceramics at
South High in Minneapolis. He was a student of Mel's

--
Lee in Mashiko, Japan
http://potters.blogspot.com/
"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
"When we all do better. We ALL do better." -Paul Wellstone

Michael Wendt on wed 22 nov 06


Nan,
I have fired the modestly sized 12 sided
Olympic style gas kiln in the 12 cubic
foot range since I built my first kiln in
1974.
It is my own design with a top half
that is counterweighted to permit
easy loading. It offers a small
studio the chance to do orders
on a weekly basis improving
cash flow and turnaround time.
It is also very low cost to
build and fire.
I could not only present the firing
characteristics but also how to build
them.
I am currently doing a complete rebuild
on my # 2 kiln and will take pictures
and maybe even video to make the
explanation clearer.
The other feature of this type of kiln
is it gives great performance if fired
slightly oxidizing. When fired that way,
it cycles from cold to cone 10 in less
than an 8 hour period.
Regards,
Michael Wendt
Wendt Pottery
2729 Clearwater Ave
Lewiston, Idaho 83501
USA
wendtpot@lewiston.com
www.wendtpottery.com

L. P. Skeen on wed 22 nov 06


Good Lord! Her work is AWESOME, but she seriously needs to do something
about the glare from the photo cube on her images; it's really bad and
distracting.

L

Susan Cline wrote:
> www.sandymillerpottery.com
>

Wally on sat 25 nov 06


Hi Lisa,

With all respect, and you know how high mine is in regard of your
invaluable contribution to Clayart, and the amazing projects of your
calendar and your dedication to the Belize Project, but aren't you
overreacting a little bit in this case ?
I do agree that some flares on the photographs are peut-=EAtre somewhat
annoying, but shiny ceramics ain't exactly the most easy things go
capture with a camera.....
Even most professional photographers are not allways able to capture a
perfect image of a glossy glazed surface on celluloid, and those rare
who master that technique usually charge exorbitant prices.....
On the other hand, a "shiny spot" on any photograph can give a certain
"depth of view" that makes the subject look more 3-dimensional.

Said that, I do agree that Sandy's work is AWESOME....
I love the Gaudian lines in her forms.
Written by "Bad Satan" Wally, Schoten, Belgium.
www.wallyasselberghs.be
(who still has your precious gift of the 2002 calender at the "place
d'honneur" in his studio......)
May life be good to you.
********************************
L. P. Skeen" wrote:
> Good Lord! Her work is AWESOME, but she seriously needs to do
something about the glare from the photo cube on her images; it's
really bad and distracting.
>>>>>Susan Cline wrote : www.sandymillerpottery.com

L. P. Skeen on sat 25 nov 06


Hey Wally,

Normally, I would agree. However, the glare on the pieces is so bad I
can see the whole light cube on the surface of her pots. On one of the
images in particular, it was the FIRST thing I saw on the page, before I
saw the actual images. And, the glare is so bad it hides the glazes so
you can't see their true depth. :( Since I don't do much photography, I
can't suggest an alternative other than ditching the light cube and just
using traditional backdrop and filtered lighting tho. Perhaps someone
more knowledgeable can help in that regard.

Why are you still stuck on the 2002 calendar? Have you not gotten a
more recent one, LOL? Glad you said that though, because I had been
trying to figure out just how long I"d been making the calendars. If
you have a 2002 one, that means 6 years. PS: This year's is better
than the 2002 version....

Lisa
http://www.living-tree.net/calendar.htm

PPS: I haven't heard peut-Ítre in over 20 years, but I did remember
what it meant, LOL.

Wally wrote:
> I do agree that some flares on the photographs are peut-Ítre somewhat annoying, but shiny ceramics ain't exactly the most easy things go capture with a camera.....
>

Arnold Howard on mon 27 nov 06


Light reflects onto the glazed pot with the same angles of a
bouncing ball on a pool table. You can remove a reflected
light source by moving the camera or the light.

You can learn a lot about lighting a shiny surface by
studying catalog pictures of silverware, Christmas
ornaments, silver jewelry, etc. In some cases you will see a
window reflected in a polished surface. That window is
actually strips of black tape placed over a light box to
make it look like a window. The reflection enhances the
image.

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com

------------
From: "L. P. Skeen"
the glare on the pieces is so bad I
can see the whole light cube on the surface of her pots.