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ash glaze peeling problems

updated sat 23 sep 06

 

Len Cockman on sun 17 sep 06


Folks:

 

Mixed up an ash glaze (from a wood-firing earlier this year).  Currently I have the neato drizzly look but it shows cracking before the firing and flakes very easily.  Do I add a bit of Alumina (maybe EPK) to cure this?  Got about 5 gallons of this stuff and it shows great potential.

 

Sincerely,

 

Len Cockman

South Bend, Indiana


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Lee Love on mon 18 sep 06


Len,

We can't help you if we don't know what you are using. What is
your recipe?


--

Lee in Mashiko, Japan
http://potters.blogspot.com/
"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi

Lee Love on mon 18 sep 06


Also, Is your ash washed? Solubles will help ash flake.

--

Lee in Mashiko, Japan
http://potters.blogspot.com/
"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi

Tony Ferguson on mon 18 sep 06


add cmc gum--I would mix it up in a blender first and then add bit by bit and test until it doesn't flake or crack. I do not understand why it would flake in the first place. Maybe include your recipe here on the list so we can look at it.

Tony Ferguson


Len Cockman wrote:
Folks:

Mixed up an ash glaze (from a wood-firing earlier this year). Currently I have the neato drizzly look but it shows cracking before the firing and flakes very easily. Do I add a bit of Alumina (maybe EPK) to cure this? Got about 5 gallons of this stuff and it shows great potential.

Sincerely,

Len Cockman
South Bend, Indiana



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Len Cockman on mon 18 sep 06



Lee:


Thanks for the response. Yes, I have decanted and washed it through a talisman sieve 4 times. The ashes were from the Notre Dame anagama that Jesse Bay and Peter Voulkos christened with prof. Bill Kremer several years ago so it must have an ornery spirit.


I am adding CMC in spray form to harden the outer surface to minimiize the peeling.  Will keep you all posted on the listserve.  Thanks for everyones advice.


Len Cockman







From:  Lee Love <togeika@CLAYCRAFT.ORG>
Reply-To:  Clayart <CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG>
To:  CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject:  Re: Ash Glaze peeling problems
Date:  Mon, 18 Sep 2006 03:52:38 -0700
>Also,   Is your ash washed?    Solubles will help ash flake.
>
>--
>
>Lee in Mashiko, Japan
>http://potters.blogspot.com/
>"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your
>subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel
Jacobson who may be reached at
>melpots@pclink.com.


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Lee Love on mon 18 sep 06


On 9/18/06, Len Cockman wrote:
>
> Lee:
>
> Thanks for the response. Yes, I have decanted and washed it through a
> talisman sieve 4 times. The ashes were from the Notre Dame anagama that
> Jesse Bay and Peter Voulkos christened with prof. Bill Kremer several years
> ago so it must have an ornery spirit.
>
> I
>
Len, I will ask again: What is in your glaze? If there is not enough
clay, it can be flakey. But there is no way to give you intelligent
advice if we don't know what is in the glaze. If it is a seccret, just
say so. ;^)

I am not sure how you washed your glaze. Do you mean you
siphoned or ladeled it off the top before running it through the sieve?
You can run it through a sieve forever and not wash it, unless you take
water off after the glaze settles and then add more. Hey, I just want to
help! ;^)
--

Lee in Mashiko, Japan
http://potters.blogspot.com/
"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi

Len Cockman on tue 19 sep 06



Lee:


I am just starting to develop my own glazes and I threw in the ashes with some cromium green into an already mixed batch of Laguna Snowflake ^5 in a 5 gallon bucket.  I keep no secrets as I am a H.S. Ceramics teacher and it is my job to "spread the word" and fight off slipcast garden gnomes and nativity sets.


Honestly I am psyched and just starting out with the glaze recipes.  Finished taking notes on Roy/Hasselberth: Mastering Cone 6 glazes just this evening.


I will try the CMC to make the glaze "stick".


Already added muriatic acid to thin an over suspended glaze.  Have made a couple of glaze test tiles and awaiting the results as soon as the kiln cools.


Len







From:  Lee Love <togeika@CLAYCRAFT.ORG>
Reply-To:  Clayart <CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG>
To:  CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject:  Re: Ash Glaze peeling problems
Date:  Mon, 18 Sep 2006 20:32:19 -0700
>On 9/18/06, Len Cockman <maplelaneclay@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>Lee:
>>
>>Thanks for the response. Yes, I have decanted and washed it through
>>a
>>talisman sieve 4 times. The ashes were from the Notre Dame anagama
>>that
>>Jesse Bay and Peter Voulkos christened with prof. Bill Kremer
>>several years
>>ago so it must have an ornery spirit.
>>
>>I
>>
>Len,  I will ask again:   What is in your
glaze?    If there is not
>enough
>clay, it can be flakey.    But there is no way to give you
>intelligent
>advice if we don't know what is in the glaze.    If it is a seccret,
>just
>say so.   ;^)
>
>          I am not sure how you washed your glaze.   Do you mean you
>siphoned or ladeled it off the top before running it through the
>sieve?
>You can run it through a sieve forever and not wash it, unless you
>take
>water off after the glaze settles and then add more.    Hey,  I just
>want to
>help!  ;^)
>--
>
>Lee in Mashiko, Japan
>http://potters.blogspot.com/
>"Let the beauty we love be what we
do." - Rumi
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your
>subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>melpots@pclink.com.


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Lee Love on wed 20 sep 06


On 9/19/06, Len Cockman wrote:

>
> I am just starting to develop my own glazes and I threw in the ashes with
> some cromium green into an already mixed batch of Laguna Snowflake ^5 in a 5
> gallon bucket.

I see. You put dry ash in the pre-mixed glaze. You can
still siphon off the extra water, add more, mix, let settle and siphon
or ladel of the top again when it settles. usually, 3 times does
the trick. You could also neutralize the alkali.

--

Lee in Mashiko, Japan
http://potters.blogspot.com/
"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi

Edouard Bastarache Inc. on thu 21 sep 06


Hello Len,

if you have added to much Epsom salt,
wash the glaze as if it was ash, it is=20
explainable by the fact that Epsom is=20
water-soluble and will "follow" the water
you decant or siphon off.
Take it from the horse's mouth !!!


Later,



Edouard Bastarache
Le Fran=E7ais Volant
The Flying Frenchman

Sorel-Tracy
Quebec
edouardb@sorel-tracy.qc.ca
www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
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http://thepottersshop.blogspot.com/

Fredrick Paget on thu 21 sep 06


I am still busy in the final stages of making ware for the Flagstaff
NAU Wood Fire event and I got out one of my favorite glazes, It is
made of Mud from Gallinas Creek - a slough that is part of the upper
reaches of the San Francisco Bay. A kayaker that I know gave me a
bucket of the mud several years ago and I tried it as a glaze.
Stink? It really does stink. No telling what crud is in that mud - It
fires brown but crawls beautifully.
I put it on over a yellow slip and it crawls at cone 10 exposing the
yellow between the snotty crawled glaze. Really striking and I think
beautiful.

Trouble is it also flakes on drying and peels away a bit. This is OK
if it goes straight into the kiln but I have to transport this ware a
thousand miles by car and it would mostly fall off. And they are
telling us no glazing at the kiln site - be ready to load.

So -- I put a bunch of Peptopon solution into it (That is a sort of
super CMC gum from Germany) and it is on the pot as tight as a drum.
No flaking.

Now I am wondering if I will see any crawling at all!

Fred Paget
--
Twin Dragon Studio
Mill Valley, CA, USA

Ron Roy on thu 21 sep 06


Hi Len,

I would add muriatic acid to thicken a glaze slop (or dissolved Epsom=20
salt) - to thin out a glaze slop I would add a deflocculant like Darvan=20=

7 or soda ash or sodium silicate.


On 19-Sep-06, at 10:25 PM, Len Cockman wrote:

> Already added muriatic acid to thin an over suspended glaze.=A0 Have=20=

> made a couple of glaze test tiles and awaiting the results as soon as=20=

> the kiln cools.
>
> Len

Lee Love on thu 21 sep 06


On 9/21/06, Ron Roy wrote:

> I would add muriatic acid to thicken a glaze slop

> On 19-Sep-06, at 10:25 PM, Len Cockman wrote:
>
> > Already added muriatic acid to thin an over suspended glaze.

Len, as I mentioned, you can wash the already mixed glaze by adding
water, mixing and letting it settle, then ladeling off the top water.
Do this 3 times.



--

Lee in Mashiko, Japan
http://potters.blogspot.com/
"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi

Len Cockman on thu 21 sep 06



Ron:


Just finished taking notes on your book about ^6 glazes. Bought it two months ago and am diving in with actually formulating glazes(following your recipes).  Your book is great stuff...has made it much easier for me to communicate to my High School potters what various raw materials do in the process of heating and cooling in the kiln. 


Also used a 5/6/7 cone pack in two locations after replacement of our evenheat at school (full of test tiles).  Found that soaking for two hrs. @ top end melted all cones in the pack. I am guessing it must have fired to approx. ^9.  We are firing decorative trivets ("B" mix with mishima architecture designs...digital pics of my kids houses ala Julia Galloway @ R.I.T.)  We are soaking this firing for just 1 hr. and we'll see results monday as we have just a half-day at school.


Again, great book!  It is a definite addition to my personal clay art library and has helped me get over the fear formulating glazes with my own raw materials...much more fun and lots cheaper compared to buying premade.


Sincerely,


Len Cockman, South Bend, Indiana. also, Northridge High School Art Department-Ceramics, Middlebury, Indiana







From:  Ron Roy <ronroy@CA.INTER.NET>
Reply-To:  Clayart <CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG>
To:  CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject:  Re: Ash Glaze peeling problems
Date:  Thu, 21 Sep 2006 21:18:24 -0400
>Hi Len,
>
>I would add muriatic acid to thicken a glaze slop (or dissolved
>Epsom salt) - to thin out a glaze slop I would add a deflocculant
>like Darvan 7 or soda ash or sodium silicate.
>
>
>On 19-Sep-06, at 10:25 PM, Len Cockman wrote:
>
>>Already added muriatic acid to thin an over suspended glaze.  Have
>>made a couple of glaze test tiles and awaiting the results as soon
>>as the kiln
cools.
>>
>>Len
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your
>subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>melpots@pclink.com.


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Len Cockman on thu 21 sep 06



Lee:


Thanks, I thought washing meant sieving/screening your glaze three times. I did this with a talisman sieve at least three times in additon to just plain decanting this stuff at least three times. It seems to help remove almost what looks like a liquid version of firescale (like in enameling) off the surface of the water.  If it sits for a few months I am guessing it would not hurt to decant the water off the top until the liquid scaliness disappears.


The muriatic acid seems to have helped. Prior to this the glaze was the liquid consistency of pudding that had not quite "set".  Orginally I added water. All this seemed to do was make more of the same consistency until it suddenly became too thinned out.  The muriatic acid appears to have reduced the thickness that sometimes happens when adding too much epsom salts. Any idea why too much epsom salt seems to oversuspend glazes?


Len







From:  Lee Love <togeika@CLAYCRAFT.ORG>
Reply-To:  Clayart <CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG>
To:  CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject:  Re: Ash Glaze peeling problems
Date:  Thu, 21 Sep 2006 18:58:16 -0700
>On 9/21/06, Ron Roy <ronroy@ca.inter.net> wrote:
>
>>I would add muriatic acid to thicken a glaze slop
>
>>On 19-Sep-06, at 10:25 PM, Len Cockman wrote:
>>
>> > Already added muriatic acid to thin an over suspended glaze.
>
>   Len, as I mentioned, you can wash the already mixed glaze by
>adding
>water, mixing and letting it settle, then ladeling off the top
>water.
>  Do this 3 times.
>
>
>
>--
>
>Lee in Mashiko,
Japan
>http://potters.blogspot.com/
>"Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your
>subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>melpots@pclink.com.


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Hank Murrow on fri 22 sep 06


Dear Fred;

I bisque my pots before traveling to the kiln. The crawly bits stay on
just fine with normal packing in boxes.

Cheers, Hank

On Sep 21, 2006, at 8:32 PM, Fredrick Paget wrote:

> I am still busy in the final stages of making ware for the Flagstaff
> NAU Wood Fire event and I got out one of my favorite glazes, It is
> made of Mud from Gallinas Creek - a slough that is part of the upper
> reaches of the San Francisco Bay. A kayaker that I know gave me a
> bucket of the mud several years ago and I tried it as a glaze.
> Stink? It really does stink. No telling what crud is in that mud - It
> fires brown but crawls beautifully.
> I put it on over a yellow slip and it crawls at cone 10 exposing the
> yellow between the snotty crawled glaze. Really striking and I think
> beautiful.
>
> Trouble is it also flakes on drying and peels away a bit. This is OK
> if it goes straight into the kiln but I have to transport this ware a
> thousand miles by car and it would mostly fall off. And they are
> telling us no glazing at the kiln site - be ready to load.
>
> So -- I put a bunch of Peptopon solution into it (That is a sort of
> super CMC gum from Germany) and it is on the pot as tight as a drum.
> No flaking.
>
> Now I am wondering if I will see any crawling at all!
>
> Fred Paget
> --
> Twin Dragon Studio
> Mill Valley, CA, USA
>
> _______________________________________________________________________
> _______
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
>
www.murrow.biz/hank