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aprons: re: clayart digest - 12 sep 2006 to 13 sep 2006 (#2006-246)

updated mon 18 sep 06

 

Donna Torrance on sun 17 sep 06


My dear mother who lived in Nebraska would call her neighbor farmer friends
and gather used overalls, then have her quilting friends help her patch
them. In the pocket of each overall was the name of the farmer and the town
he was from, written with a black sharpie. I loved that outreach of
Nebraska farmers to the students here in Naples Florida. She's gone now,
but I still have a few of the oldies left. Many of the farmers are gone
too, but the overalls are hanging in there!
----- Original Message -----
From: "Automatic digest processor"
To: "Recipients of CLAYART digests"
Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 12:00 AM
Subject: CLAYART Digest - 12 Sep 2006 to 13 Sep 2006 (#2006-246)


> There are 76 messages totalling 6289 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Thixtropic clay (7)
> 2. Clay aprons (4)
> 3. Commercial Cone 6 glazes (4)
> 4. Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ?? (5)
> 5. Teapot handles - T.or S. Clennell
> 6. kiln shed (2)
> 7. Clayart-signing posts (2)
> 8. : Re: Thixtropic clay
> 9. photo up of wall hanging
> 10. Clay Expressions
> 11. Clay aprons, for schools (2)
> 12. aprons
> 13. workshop presenters
> 14. Throwing Closed Forms - Any advice??
> 15. the public's understanding of paperclay (5)
> 16. Finding Kansas/Missouri Potters (2)
> 17. Clay Expressions Potter/Moms Swap
> 18. drying....what am I missing???
> 19. glazing/clay frustration (2)
> 20. Lid shrinking more than the opening in bisque firing.
> 21. Gas Kiln for Sale
> 22. Response to Laurence re: warping plates
> 23. Misc:Pinholes, Throwing Sticks;Talent: Stirring Story (Manganese)
> 24. Clayboss Wheel Resolution?
> 25. Glaze Calculation (2)
> 26. Clay Expressions-Mom Swap
> 27. Iron red glaze on web site
> 28. calendar countdown...
> 29. CLAYART Digest - 9 Sep 2006 to 10 Sep 2006 (#2006-243)
> 30. Windows, Linux, Mac - separate corners, children. (3)
> 31. Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ?? (OT not clay) (2)
> 32. The Last Brickmaker (2)
> 33. paper clay and bricks (4)
> 34. OT: Anyone using Earthlink's SpamBlocker?
> 35. Thixtropic clay--casting slip question
> 36. Music in the Studio: iTunes Sony Sonic Stage was : Windows, Linux,
> Mac -
> which one for you ?? (OT not clay)
> 37. oxidation and wood ash? (2)
> 38. paper clay part two
> 39. Five Potters Book
> 40. 240v outlet cost?
> 41. paper clay part two - just-a-thought...
> 42. Architectural Ceramics, tilemaking workshops: S. California
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 23:34:12 -0500
> From: Ron Roy
> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>
> Hi Ivor,
>
> I'm saying that bentonite helps if clay is not plastic enough - or glazes
> don't suspend well - thats all.
>
> As I understand it - bacteria produce acid during their life cycles -
> which
> then improves flocculation - which improves workability. If you add
> vinegar
> to a clay slip you will see the thickening for instance.
>
> RR
>
>
>>Yes, I was aware that many minerals in clay will release metallic ions
>>that have the ability to destroy or negate hydrogen bonding. Are you
>>saying that Bentonite is of no consequence.
>>
>>I continue to wonder about the nature of Bacterial Action. What is about
>>this process that causes the clay to improve. Carbonic acid seems a
>>natural candidate in ensuring good plasticity with a high yield point
>>since this is one of the two end products of bacterial decay or organic
>>detritus.
>>
>>Best regards,
>>
>>Ivor
>
> Ron Roy
> RR#4
> 15084 Little Lake Road
> Brighton, Ontario
> Canada
> K0K 1H0
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 20:38:18 -0700
> From: pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET
> Subject: Re: Clay aprons
>
> Hi Claire,
>
>
> Maybe see if you can make a deal with the Home
> Economy Classes for them to make some nice ones
> for your classes to use.
>
> Aprons are easy to make, and owuld be a good
> Sewing excercise for them to do...that is, if they
> still have Sewing as part of Home Economy Classes,
> then...seems like something should be possible.
>
> Some medium or lighter weight 'Sail Cloth' or Duck
> ought to do nicely, or the heavier Cotton
> Denims...
>
> You can have your Classes make them some tolerable
> graduated Mixing Bowls or something...
>
> And everyone then would be happy...
>
>
>
> Phil
> Las Vegas
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Claire Reishman"
>
>
> I have a question about where to find good clay
> aprons. I teach in a high school where we need
> good aprons to protect kids' pants legs from
> slurry that slips out of the splash pan while
> they're throwing. I would like to find good
> quality aprons which can stand up to a couple of
> years of hard work and frequent washings. It
> would be excellent if the aprons had adjustable
> neck straps, but all ties (neck straps, waist
> ties, leg ties) have to be substantial, or else
> they will catch on the washing machine center and
> rip off. Does anybody have a recommendation?
>
> Claire Reishman, St. Andrew's-Sewanee School,
> Sewanee, TN
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 23:56:04 -0400
> From: "L. P. Skeen"
> Subject: Re: Clay aprons
>
> Collaborate with your home ec teacher and get some split-leg aprons =
> made. They are easy to make, just use up a couple yards of denim and =
> some bias tape binding for neck strap and ties.
>
> L
> ----- Original Message -----=20
> From: Claire Reishman=20
>
> I have a question about where to find good clay aprons. I teach in a =
> high school where we need good aprons to protect kids' pants legs from =
> slurry that slips out of the splash pan while they're throwing.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 22:59:25 -0500
> From: Vince Pitelka
> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>
> Steve Slatin wrote:
>> And now, having settled on the formulation "dramatic thixotropy" how
>> about some suggestions regarding mixing up clay bodies that
>> demonstrate "dramatic thixotropy?"
>> I've got some sodium silicate, also some soda ash around somewhere,
>> so roughly what's a good point to start at for experimenting? I don't
>> want to turn the body all the way into casting sludge, I want to be able
>> to pull it like taffy. Whack it like a pocupine. Pound it like a veal
>> medallion.
>
> Steve -
> Normally, 1/4 of 1% of the dry weight of the clay is enough to
> deflocculate
> a slip, but in another post there was some mention of over-deflocculation
> to
> achieve extreme thixotropic behavior in clay. In deflocculating terra
> sig,
> it seems generally agreed that a combination of sodium silicate and soda
> ash
> works very well - I add 1/4 of 1% of each. So if you have access to some
> soda ash you might want to try that. There is bound to be a point of
> diminishing returns in the deflocculant addition, so I would try a range
> of
> additions from 1/2% to 3% or 4% deflocculant of the dry weight of the
> clay,
> which you can estimate by subtracting 25% of the wet weight. As you
> probably know, once you achieve truly thixotropic clay, there's a pretty
> limited range of things you can do with it. Mostly, you get clay shapes
> that look like pulled taffy. As you can imagine, that gets old pretty
> quick, and that's what happened when thixotropic clay was briefly popular
> back in the 60s or 70s. A visual technique based on such a limited
> gimmick
> doesn't really go very far. Then again, it might be in your destiny to
> produce the great thixotropic clay masterpiece of all time.
> Good luck -
> - Vince
>
> Vince Pitelka
> Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee Technological University
> Smithville TN 37166, 615/597-6801 x111
> vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu
> http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/
> http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 23:08:20 -0500
> From: Shirley Ostrander
> Subject: Commercial Cone 6 glazes
>
> Hey folks! I needed to vent a little and ask some questions.
>
>
>
> I purchased some commercial cone 6 glazes from L & R specialties in Nixa,
> MO
> - www.claydogs.com - and I've had them for a
> few
> months. Let me say that I am VERY new to all of this - I took my first
> throwing class in January 06 and can't keep my hands out of the "mud" !!!
>
>
>
> I've only done earthenware and have been very successful with marbling
> white
> and red earthenware clays. I wanted to try my hand at stoneware and
> porcelain and I've been pleased with the results. I've done some marbling
> with the porcelain and well - I'm hooked.
>
>
>
> The one thing that I HATE (because I'm no good at it) is glazing. The
> marbled earthenware gets a simple clear dipping glaze that is premixed and
> so very simple! I thought - hey - you can get dipping glazes for
> stoneware
> and porcelain, I'll try that. My very first glaze firing at cone 6 was a
> huge disappointment! While there is a lot of information out there about
> mixing one's own glazes and tweaking formulas, there's very little (at
> least
> that I've found) on the mechanics of adding water and testing the
> consistency and running the glaze through a sieve, how long to dip, how
> thick the coat of glaze should be, etc. Shoot, even the class I took only
> taught throwing - not glaze application, not firing, nothing else. is
> that
> typical? If so - it's time that someone fix that problem.
>
>
>
> I have a copy of Mastering cone 6 glazes - but as far as I've gotten into
> it, it focuses on building a good recipie - not on the "stir until peaks
> are
> shiny and stiff" part of the process.
>
>
>
> Having said all that - here's what happened. I mixed 2 glazes - the clear
> and the pattern blue. I used distilled water and 5 lbs of dry glaze. I
> put
> less than a gallon of water with the dry glaze, even though someone at L&R
> told me that a gallon would be fine and that a hydrometer wouldn't really
> be
> necessary. It was thinner than egg nog, heaver than milk - "light cream"
> and coated my fingers. I dipped and the coating was similar to what I get
> on the earthenware that been dipping in the clear glaze (the consistency
> was
> similar too) The clay bodies that I used were L&R ^6 porcelain and ^6
> stoneware. I thought, hey that should be a good match, right? I called
> them today because the "pattern blue" that I used turned out BLACK - on
> both
> the porcelain and the stoneware - turns out that someone forgot to put the
> rutile in a batch that went out (go figure, I'd get 5 of the 25 or so
> pounds
> that slipped by). The clear - well, it crazed - BADLY and is still
> crazing.
> (it might have settled by now) turns out that "oh yeah, the clear does
> that".. Now, L&R is sending me replacement pattern blue - but DAMN -
> what's
> with the clear crazing - don't you think they should mention that when
> they
> sell it - or in the description somewhere?
>
>
>
> Got any ideas where I can get some commercial glazes that will work
> reasonably well? I'm not ready to get into mixing my own - I need to
> really
> focus on the clay and the forms and the process - I will expand
> eventually,
> but for now - I'd like to at least have something that I can count on to
> work consistently. I'm doing this for pleasure - not for a living so
> until
> I retire from my 'day job', I'm not committing to mixing my own clay
> bodies
> and glazes.
>
>
>
> Oh yeah - I have a brand new evenheat electric kiln with computer
> controller
> and it's been fired to ^04, and ^06 less than 10 times and to ^6 once. in
> case that makes a difference.
>
>
>
> Any thoughts/advice is welcome!
>
>
>
> Shirley
>
> In Memphis where it's cooled down considerably and I'm still at work
> (11:08pm) trying to get home before midnight. :-)
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 21:13:04 -0700
> From: Scott Harrison
> Subject: Re: Clay aprons
>
> Best thing we have found are overalls. Sometimes you can get used
> ones from St. Vinnie's or Salvation Army or a business that goes
> through them and discards one's that need minor repair.
>
> Scott Harrison
> South Fork High School
> Humboldt Redwoods CA
>
>
> On Sep 12, 2006, at 1:50 PM, Claire Reishman wrote:
>
>> I have a question about where to find good clay aprons. I teach in
>> a high school where we need good aprons to protect kids' pants legs
>> from slurry that slips out of the splash pan while they're
>> throwing. I would like to find good quality aprons which can stand
>> up to a couple of years of hard work and frequent washings. It
>> would be excellent if the aprons had adjustable neck straps, but
>> all ties (neck straps, waist ties, leg ties) have to be
>> substantial, or else they will catch on the washing machine center
>> and rip off. Does anybody have a recommendation?
>>
>> Claire Reishman, St. Andrew's-Sewanee School, Sewanee, TN
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________
>> ________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 21:20:39 -0700
> From: Lee Love
> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>
> On 9/12/06, Steve Slatin wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> With apologies for asking an on-topic question, I remain,
>> informationless --
>
>
> "Interesting" is far more important than an authoritarian focus. ;^)
> Nevertheless, Maybe Neph Sye can give you a clue:
>
> Posted earlier from Nelson:
>
> Also listed is a glaze for thixotropic clay body:
> (Cone 5, crazes at Cone 9)
>
> 16 Kaolin (EPK)
> 24 Nepheline Syenite
> 60 Fetto Frit #3124
>
>
> --
>
> Lee in Mashiko, Japan
> http://potters.blogspot.com/
> "Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 15:39:58 +1000
> From: Malcolm Cooke
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ??
>
> Hi all
> You still under the impression that macs need specialised peripherals
> not so, if it usb compliant or firewire compliant peripherals is used
> it will work with a mac just by pluging it in. It was only in the
> Origional Version of OSX there was a problem with bogey USB
> peripherals. But that was years ago. Windows only really became usb
> compliant with XP and then on older HW it is very problematic works
> sometimes usually not.
>
> Many times we have USB drives which are so called windows only wont
> work on older windows HW but work on all macs going back to the first
> iMac.
> Cheers
> On 12/09/2006, at 10:35 PM, Lee Love wrote:
>
>> On 9/11/06, Malcolm Cooke wrote:
>>>
>>> OSX will not run on any generic clone the mother boards are not
>>> compatible with the non bios boot system which the Mac OSX needs.
>>
>>
>> Malcolm C,
>>
>> The clones that have been written about are Mac clones and not
>> generic ones. Is it true that it is "illegal" to run Mac OS on
>> anything
>> other than a Mac? That's the kind of thinking that keeps me away
>> from
>> them.
>>
>> But Linux is in my future. Just need to get my Vaio
>> 505TR a
>> new HD. My 3 Windows machines are FireWire 800 capable. Which
>> is a good
>> Mac idea that I wish was more widespread, so more inexpensive non-Mac
>> peripherals were available for it. :^) I use a LaCie external
>> HDrive
>> with FW 800.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Lee in Mashiko, Japan
>> http://potters.blogspot.com/
>> "Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________
>> ________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
> Malcolm Cooke
>
> Identity Environment & Art
> 7 Naas Rd Tharwa ACT 2620 Australia
> mcooke@placemaking.com.au
> http://www.placemaking.com.au
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 01:50:24 -0400
> From: Janine Roubik
> Subject: Teapot handles - T.or S. Clennell
>
> Tony or Sheila (or, of course, anyone else w/experience with this)
> I hope you're on here - I thought I'd seen your names!
> I read your March/April 2004 article in PMI about the handmade teapot
> handles. This is something I'd like to try - except I can't find any
> craft or hobby stores around here (Milwaukee, WI) that carry basket making
> supplies. I was going to try to order some online, but then after looking
> at a few site I realized I'm in way over my head and am not sure what size
> of the reed or cane to get because I can't take a pot with me to see what
> would look the best.
> Any tips?
> Thanks everyone!
> Janine Roubik
>
> P.S. for Tom Buck or John Britt - after all that talking about the
> replacing of the black iron oxide (in the Tom Buck Celadon)I realized the
> studio I'm firing at didn't have any Grolleg. So since I had to go to
> the "clay place" anyway, I just got the black iron oxide! It looks
> beautiful! Thanks for all the help!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 01:37:52 -0500
> From: Patrick Cross
> Subject: Re: kiln shed
>
> I've never seen this stuff (*Pallet Racking*) used in this way before but
> I
> think it would make a lot of sense for putting up a kiln shed. Some image
> links...use your imagination.
>
> http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.atlasequipment.com/graphics/palt_rk1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.atlasequipment.com/prod_rck.htm&h=340&w=444&sz=21&hl=en&start=26&tbnid=k0dVu31HRbb9DM:&tbnh=97&tbnw=127&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dpallet%2Brack%26start%3D20%26ndsp%3D20%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26sa%3DN
>
> http://www.chinarack.com/images/Pallet%20Rack/Pallet%20Rack.jpg
>
> http://images.google.com/images?q=pallet+rack&ndsp=20&svnum=10&hl=en&lr=&start=60&sa=N
>
> 1. It would go up in a flash...and if a move was ever necessary later
> could
> come down quickly too. All you'd need to do is sheath the outside
> perimeter
> with something else fire proof and configure some sort of roof.
>
> 2. Easily bolted down to a slab...extremely rigid and capable of handling
> tremendous loads.
>
> 3. It would go beyond simply enclosing a kiln. With a row of this on
> either side (and maybe at one end) just think of all that nice
> adjustable shelf space for kiln furniture...bricks for the door...room to
> lay out pots during loading and unloading or a place to put pots ready to
> be
> fired and free up space in the studio until the next firing. A place to
> keep some quantity of wood if it's for a wood kiln. Potters love their
> horizontal surfaces...and there's never enough, right? There would be the
> obvious savings of not having to outfit your shed with shelves because the
> building itself would be a huge shelf unit.
>
> 4. It's modular so expanding later to allow for another kiln or what ever
> would be relatively uncomplicated if you planned ahead a little. Anyone
> with even a minimal skill level could put this stuff together...no
> cutting,
> sawing, welding...except maybe for whatever the roof would require.
>
> 5. Widely available especially if you live near a metropolitan
> area....And
> can often times be purchased used for about half the cost. It's not that
> inexpensive but think of the time and labor you'd save as opposed to
> constructing a shed...without the pros and benefits...out of some other
> material.
>
> What do y'all think?...To me it looks like "Instant Building"...and you
> could get right back to doing what you really want to do...your art.
>
> Patrick Cross (cone10soda)
>
>
> On 9/12/06, Don Goodrich wrote:
>>
>> Hi Judy,
>> You might try the Metal Roofing Alliance website:
>> http://www.metalroofing.com
>> It has a couple of places where you can search out local
>> suppliers. Their idea of what's "local" may be wildly
>> at odds with your own, but sometimes you get lucky.
>> For instance, when I entered the Zip code for Cambridge, MA,
>> it spit out names of suppliers in Maine, Indiana,
>> and Millford, New Hampshire. The NH one might do for your needs.
>> Their website is http://preciousmetalroofs.com
>>
>> Good luck,
>> Don Goodrich
>>
>> goodrichdn@aol.com
>> http://dongoodrichpottery.com/
>>
>>
>> On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 11:14:35 -0700, je motzkin
>> wrote:
>>
>> >Next weekend I plan to build a shed over my gas kiln. I am working on a
>> design for this that might include a hinged roof made of metal roofing on
>> a
>> wood frame, so that I can open it when hot or smoky. I cannot find metal
>> roofing in this part of the country. Any suggestions?
>> >
>> > Any pics or ideas of sheds that you have build please send link or
>> > send
>> photo to me off list. thanks.
>> > jude
>>
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 00:00:01 -0800
> From: Kris Bliss
> Subject: Re: Clay aprons
>
> get the ones from clayart tacoma,
> these are great, tie around the calf area,
> waist tie... washable just wonderfull.
> and cute too. split leg. fit well ...
>
> kris
> in sunny anchorage.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Claire Reishman"
> To:
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 12:50 PM
> Subject: Clay aprons
>
>
> I have a question about where to find good clay aprons. I teach in a high
> school where we need good aprons to protect kids' pants legs from slurry
> that slips out of the splash pan while they're throwing. I would like to
> find good quality aprons which can stand up to a couple of years of hard
> work and frequent washings. It would be excellent if the aprons had
> adjustable neck straps, but all ties (neck straps, waist ties, leg ties)
> have to be substantial, or else they will catch on the washing machine
> center and rip off. Does anybody have a recommendation?
>
> Claire Reishman, St. Andrew's-Sewanee School, Sewanee, TN
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:34:56 +0930
> From: Ivor and Olive Lewis
> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>
> Dear Steve Slatin,=20
> AS I said earlier, read Ed 4 of Glen Nelson. Shows good illustrations =
> of "pulled taffy"
>
> Once you have your deflocculated your clay allow the water to evaporate =
> until you get a stiff sludge.
>
> Or use the recipe I gave to Vince for an experiment but mix your =
> defloccing agents in your water and cut the mass of water down to about =
> 10%. Let stand for 24 hours then mix. If you need more water spray with =
> an atomiser.
>
> Best regards,.
>
> Ivor Lewis.
> Redhill,
> South Australia.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 15:37:11 +0930
> From: Ivor and Olive Lewis
> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>
> Dear Earl,
>
> Nothing new in your Hydrogen Bond Theory. It is well explained by W.E. =
> Brownell, "Industrial Ceramics", Ch 4. ISBN 3-211-81382-9, 1976.
>
> An illustration of the strength of the hydrogen bond is the way it =
> allows skaters to enjoy their sport, which would be impossible if water =
> had an unpolarised molecule.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Ivor Lewis.
> Redhill,
> South Australia.
> ..=20
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 15:57:45 +0930
> From: Ivor and Olive Lewis
> Subject: Clayart-signing posts
>
> Dear Veena,=20
>
> Using your URL after you name is really superfluous since this is given =
> at the top of your message !.
>
> Why not follow my example ?
>
> Best regards,
>
> Ivor Lewis.
> Redhill,
> South Australia.
>
>
> Veena Raghavan asked the following:-
>
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 12:56:47 EDT
> From: Veena Raghavan
> Subject: Clayart-signing posts
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> Once again, I have a request. Would it be possible for everyone to sign =
> their
> full name in some form or another at the end of their post. I just sign
> Veena, but at the bottom, my e-mail address has my full name. I like to =
> save
> information from Clayart and like to acknowledge the person who posted =
> the
> information, but without the name, I cannot do this.
>
> Thank you everyone, and Mel, thank you for posting this, if you do!
>
> Veena
>
> VeenaRaghavan@cs.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:21:48 +0930
> From: Ivor and Olive Lewis
> Subject: : Re: Thixtropic clay
>
> Dear Vince Pitelka,
> Not so long ago we had our attention directed towards images of clay =
> revealed by a new form of Scanning Electron Microscope. These featured =
> images of clay crystals, superb hexagonal plates on which rested =
> globules of water. The commentary explained that Kaolinite was =
> Hydrophobic. This means that it has no affinity to water. The people who =
> did this work were
> Dr Jim Buckman
> ESEM Facility Manager,
> Insitute of Petroleum Engineering,
> Heriot-Watt University,
> Riccarton,
> Edinburgh,
> EH14 4AS.
>
> And
>
> Prof Adrian Todd
> CESEM Director,
> Institute of Petroleum Engineering,
> Heriot-Watt University,
> Riccarton,
> Edinburgh,
> EH14 4AS.
>
> Yes, you are right to surmise that I do not think there is an =
> appreciable degree of free water in plastic clay. Clay particles of the =
> Kaolin group of minerals have mixed +ve and -ve charges around their =
> edges but the faces of the crystals carry opposite charges, one for each =
> exposed atom. If Valency Shell Electron Pair Repulsion Theory is applied =
> to the basic molecular unit of Kaolinite, it becomes quite obvious that =
> exposed tetrahedral silica-oxygen units are charged negative and the =
> exposed hydrogen ions of the octahedral Hydroxy Aluminate units are =
> charged positive. At this point I would refer you to W.E. Brownell, Ch =
> 4. There is sufficient electronic force from the billions or is it =
> trillions of clay crystals in every cubic inch of clay to induce water =
> molecules ( which in fluid water are known to exist in limited volume =
> ordered structures because of their polarised nature) to form a totally =
> solid water structure. This is what Lawrence and West (Ceramic Science =
> for Potters) called a "Water Hull". What they did not appreciate was =
> the actual volume of water involved. A simple calculation shows the =
> "water hull" to be approximately twice the volume of the clay crystal =
> that it surrounds. To the best of my knowledge this has been known for =
> almost half a century though I worked it out after reading a basic =
> chemistry text.
>
> A simple experiment is to weigh out a kilogram (1000 grams) of dry clay =
> powder and 250 grams of pure water. Put your water in a dish or flat =
> based container. Now sift you clay powder into the water. Eventually you =
> will cover the water. Carry on sifting and when all the powder is in the =
> container carefully, with a soft brush, level the surface without =
> pressing down. Cover the container and leave it to stand for 24 yours =
> before you examine it. I would like to know if your observations match =
> mine? I was enlightened by what I saw.
>
> Perhaps the most important result so far that has come from this =
> discussion is that it illustrates the extent to which the ceramic =
> community is influenced by ststements in the Dictionary of Frank Hamer. =
> This volume is treated as though it were the highest authority with =
> respect to pottery science and technology. Such reverence may prevent =
> critical research, investigation and evaluation when we are faced with =
> topics such as this one.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Ivor Lewis.
> Redhill,
> South Australia.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 03:21:04 -0700
> From: Lee Love
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ??
>
> On 9/12/06, Malcolm Cooke wrote:
>>
>> Hi all
>> You still under the impression that macs need specialised peripherals
>>
>
> I don't know that anybody said they do. Only that generic hardware
> inspired by apple usually costs less. Like my firewire800 HD.
>
> I just heard that iTunes is now available in Japan. This is
> great. I've tried to sign up with ItUNES and sony's music services when
> they first came out, but I couldn't because I am computing from Japan,
> even
> though I have a legal residence in Minneapolis and also a bank in the
> States. Because my ISP server is in Japan, I couldn't sign up. I
> figure it must be some kind of licensing restriction.
>
>
>
> --
>
> Lee in Mashiko, Japan
> http://potters.blogspot.com/
> "Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 07:28:35 -0400
> From: Carole Fox
> Subject: photo up of wall hanging
>
> With Holly's help, I emailed the photo of the wall hanging that needs help
> with attachments to the Clayart Flickr site. .
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/clayart
>
> I am guessing it weighs 20-25 ponds(?). The wires in the back are from the
> gallery hanging system. I am sorry for the poor quality of the photo.
>
> Please let me know if you can suggest a way to put this thing together
> that
> doesn't look so crappy.
> Carole Fox
> Silver Fox Pottery
> Elkton, MD
> silverfoxpottery@comcast.net
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 08:00:02 -0400
> From: Lori Jenkins
> Subject: Clay Expressions
>
> The Clay Expressions conference at AMACO will provide both a continental
> breakfast and lunch for attending participants. If you have any questions
> please give me a call. Lori Jenkins 800-925-5195 or you can
> e mail me at ljenkins@amaco.com. George Debikey 800-925-5195 or
> gdebikey@amaco.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 08:29:45 -0400
> From: linda rosen
> Subject: Re: Clay aprons, for schools
>
> Claire ,
>
> This works well in our classroom (we have close to 200 ceramic =
> students). We
> use heavy duty cloth backed vinyl aprons. Before they go back on the =
> hooks,
> students sponge them clean as part of their end of class routine (never =
> see
> a washing machine). We have been able to get away with having just one =
> apron
> per wheel, not providing cover-ups for hand building. They easily last =
> out
> the year. After a couple years the straps crack and strings knot, but =
> the
> aprons are still functional with a bit of duct tape. Really nice ones ( =
> even
> with split legs) could be made up ( on my someday list), but we go with =
> what
> our clay supplier stocks which is an awful bright yellow. I've seen them =
> at
> Art supply stores too.=20
>
> Linda Rosen, Toronto
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Claire =
> Reishman
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 4:50 PM
> To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
> Subject: Clay aprons
>
> I have a question about where to find good clay aprons. I teach in a =
> high
> school where we need good aprons to protect kids' pants legs from slurry
> that slips out of the splash pan while they're throwing. I would like =
> to
> find good quality aprons which can stand up to a couple of years of hard
> work and frequent washings. It would be excellent if the aprons had
> adjustable neck straps, but all ties (neck straps, waist ties, leg ties)
> have to be substantial, or else they will catch on the washing machine
> center and rip off. Does anybody have a recommendation?
>
> Claire Reishman, St. Andrew's-Sewanee School, Sewanee, TN
>
> _________________________________________________________________________=
> ___
> __
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 07:49:31 -0500
> From: mel jacobson
> Subject: aprons
>
> i went to some of the big box grocery chain stores
> and asked them for old/used aprons.
> hit the jackpot...got 30 green/long aprons.
> used them for years. put up some hooks near the door...and bango.
> went to home ec once a week and ran them through
> the home laundry. (don't let the tie strings tangle...worse than a
> backlash
> on a 1950 langley `lakecast` reel.)
> home ec was next door. a few mugs/ and free laundry
> service. (just made sure we did not leave clay on the washer)
> mel
>
> from: mel/minnetonka.mn.usa
> website: http://www.visi.com/~melpots/
>
> Clayart page link: http://www.visi.com/~melpots/clayart.html
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 08:52:05 EDT
> From: Susan Fox Hirschmann
> Subject: Re: Clay aprons, for schools
>
> Over the years I have collected about 20 aprons from restaurants, kitchen
> shops, etc. I have tried to buy more at Michaels Crafts but they fall
> apart in
> the washer.
> So I know that decent aprons that last and last in repeated washings are
> hard
> to come by. When I see nice ones, with pockets (since I also teach
> adults),
> I buy them, cause they are worth the price in longevity. When they leave
> I
> have them retie the strings into bows before putting them in a delicate
> cycle in
> the washer for less of a mess in trying to untangle them.
> Whole foods used to sell some really nice ones, but they are sortta
> pricey....tho I have found some at Plaza Art Supplies, not sure if you
> have that around
> where you are. You could google
> Jerry's Artarama....they have reasonably priced art supplies and ship
> everywhere.
> Best of luck!
>
> Susan
> Annandale, VA
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 08:54:42 -0400
> From: Marty Morgan
> Subject: workshop presenters
>
> Is there a list of potters who give workshops, with information about fees
> and working conditions etc.?
>
>
>
> I'm trying to revive an old support group for potters north of Boston and
> want to offer ideas about possible workshops.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Marty Morgan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 08:59:12 -0400
> From: Mike Juengling
> Subject: Re: Commercial Cone 6 glazes
>
> Hi Shirley, I am just a clay 'weekend warrior' so take my advice for
> what it is worth. I had a similar experience when I first started a few
> years ago. A local pottery supplier talked me into buying their
> prepared glazes. I told them how I was using it and firing it (^6
> oxidation) and they showed me samples and told me how easy it was going
> to make my life. Well after firing a batch I had the same disappointing
> results as you, except mine was caused by blistering and running. Not
> knowing their formula I couldn't adjust their glazes to fix the
> problems. I ended up pitching all the commercial glaze out.
>
> I went back to mixing and testing my own. This has led me to a lot of
> reading about glaze development and testing glazes (which, because of my
> part time involvement is an on going process). I have had some good
> results and some bad, but I am beginning to learn how to control the
> process. It is a whole lot more satisfying, when it comes out right if
> I am responsible for the whole process.
>
> Anyways, I guess what I am trying to recommend is that you should
> reconsider 'rolling your own' glaze. It is the best way to get what you
> want.
>
> Michael Juengling
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 08:59:48 -0400
> From: Bonnie Staffel
> Subject: Re: Throwing Closed Forms - Any advice??
>
> When I make closed forms or teach it, I emphasize the fact that a =
> "chimney"
> always has to be present IMO. Clay that is thus formed will close up =
> for
> you. I also use a small stick to support the inside when my finger is =
> too
> large for the hole. This same stick can then be laid on the top at an =
> angle
> to do the final closing which will either remove the remaining tiny =
> chimney
> or will blend it into the closed form. I have found that it takes =
> longer to
> close the pot than to throw the whole thing. The thickness of the clay
> forming this "chimney" needs to be no thinner or thicker than the body =
> of
> the pot. Wrinkles or collapse shows that the wall is uneven in =
> thickness.
> Any unevenness in your throwing technique always shows up at the top.
> Sometimes it seems like you spend time cutting it off level quite a lot.
> This tells you to practice throwing the walls to get the clay =
> distributed
> evenly. Also if your clay has not been properly prepared, an unevenness =
> of
> moisture in various parts of the wall will also show up with a wavy top. =
> =20
>
> Through the years I have found that closed forms gave me the basis for =
> many
> of my sculptures as the form can be altered by paddling, or is strong to
> hold up to pressures of clay additions from the trapped air inside. =20
>
> Takes practice but worth the work when you achieve a nicely closed form. =
> =20
>
> Bonnie Staffel
>
> http://webpages.charter.net/bstaffel/
>
> http://vasefinder.com/bstaffelgallery1.html
>
> DVD Throwing with Coils and Slabs
> DVD Beginning Processes
> Charter Member Potters Council
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 08:06:23 -0500
> From: "Smith, Judy"
> Subject: Re: the public's understanding of paperclay
>
> I am new to ceramics and only have a slight understanding of what paper
> clay is. Do you have a good recipe for making paper clay or do you know
> where I can get more information about this medium?
>
> Thanks,
> Judy Smith=20
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Craig Clark
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 6:37 PM
> To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
> Subject: Re: the public's understanding of paperclay
>
> Meryl, you will run into the folks who automatically think paper
> mache whenever they read paper+clay. A short description of what paper
> clay is would help to inform those who would like to know. I like to
> call it "magic clay" because of all the stuff that you can get away when
> working with it.
> It really isn't all that new though. It has been around in different
> forms for a very long time. As far as the comtemporary widespread
> application and use of paper clay goes, much of the credit belongs to
> Rossette Gault. She is the one who did pretty extensive research back in
> the early 1990's. For a brief history from a 2004 symposium on the
> subject just follow the
> link....http://www.grahamhay.com.au/hay2006update.html
> Hope this helps
> Craig Dunn CLark
> 619 East 11 1/2 St
> Houston, Texas 77008
> (713)861-2083
> mudman@hal-pc.org
>
> ..curtis adkins wrote:
>> Hi,
>> Are you making it or buying it premade...maybe just tell them the
> process ...ie ^5 or ^10 stoneware or porcelain some folks just don't
> need to no anymore than what it isa for and how much it costs!
>>
>> Curtis "Monk" Adkins
>> Miami, OK
>> Meryl Ruth wrote: Hi, I went to an opening where
>
>> I had pieces of my work on display yesterday. This was the first time
> I was showing work I had created from paperclay. I have previously only
> worked in stoneware and porcelain. Anyway we overheard two women
> discussing one of my pieces made of paperclay. One woman said, "What is
> paperclay?" And the reply of the second woman was, "I think that means
> paper mache`."
>>
>> The public is not educated regarding paperclay. Do I display
> information about this relatively new medium along with my work or is
> there another name for paperclay that can be used so it is not
> misrepresented as paper mache`. I wouldn't want folks to think my
> teapots were created from paper mache`. Not too functional!
>>
>> Regards,
>> Meryl Ruth, Porcelain Grace
>> http://www.merylruth.com
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________
>> ________ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription=20
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________
>> ________ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription=20
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ______
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 08:21:09 -0500
> From: Pam Cresswell
> Subject: Re: Finding Kansas/Missouri Potters
>
> Try the KC Clay Guild, www.kcclayguild.org in KC MO
>
>
>
>
> Subject: [CLAYART] Finding Kansas/Missouri Potters
>
> Hi! Could anyone tell me how to query the list to get studio addresses?
> I
> am interested in finding other potters living and working in Kansas and
> Missouri. Thanks! C. A. Sanger
>
> C. A. Sanger Sparfish Studio Herington, KS
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 09:27:46 -0400
> From: Bob Masta
> Subject: Re: the public's understanding of paperclay
>
> One reason for the public confusion over this, is that there is a
> commercial product called "paperclay" that really *is* like paper mache...
> crumbles after firing. It's used by "crafters" for making things like
> doll
> heads and beads. So if the public has run into that product already,
> there will naturally be some wrong assumptions. I think you would have
> to go into some detail to explain the differences, if you are going to use
> the term.
>
> Best regards,
>
>
>
>
> Bob Masta
>
> potsATdaqartaDOTcom
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 09:36:46 -0400
> From: Ivy Glasgow
> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>
> This brings two questions to mind. Can just any clay be made thixotropic
> by
> this approach, or are there some which don't respond to treatment with a
> deflocculant? And, could just any clay be made into a casting slip?
>
> I'm tuning in to this subject kind of late, so I apologize if this ground
> has already been covered.
>
> Ivy G, biding time and resting wrists till my pugmill arrives (woohoo!).
>
>>Steve Slatin wrote:
>> And now, having settled on the formulation "dramatic thixotropy" how
>> about some suggestions regarding mixing up clay bodies that
>> demonstrate "dramatic thixotropy?"
>> I've got some sodium silicate, also some soda ash around somewhere,
>> so roughly what's a good point to start at for experimenting? I don't
>> want to turn the body all the way into casting sludge, I want to be able
>> to pull it like taffy. Whack it like a pocupine. Pound it like a veal
>> medallion.
>
>>Steve -
>>Normally, 1/4 of 1% of the dry weight of the clay is enough to
>>deflocculate
>>a slip, but in another post there was some mention of over-deflocculation
>> >to
>>achieve extreme thixotropic behavior in clay. In deflocculating terra sig,
>>it seems generally agreed that a combination of sodium silicate and soda
>> >ash
>>works very well - I add 1/4 of 1% of each. So if you have access to some
> soda ash you might want to try that. There is bound to be a point of
> diminishing returns in the deflocculant addition, so I would try a range
> of
> additions from 1/2% to 3% or 4% deflocculant of the dry weight of the
> clay,
> which you can estimate by subtracting 25% of the wet weight. As you
> probably know, once you achieve truly thixotropic clay, there's a pretty
> limited range of things you can do with it. Mostly, you get clay shapes
> that look like pulled taffy. As you can imagine, that gets old pretty
> quick, and that's what happened when thixotropic clay was briefly popular
> back in the 60s or 70s. A visual technique based on such a limited gimmick
> doesn't really go very far. Then again, it might be in your destiny to
> produce the great thixotropic clay masterpiece of all time.
> Good luck -
> - Vince
>
> Vince Pitelka
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 06:58:42 -0700
> From: Elizabeth Priddy
> Subject: Clay Expressions Potter/Moms Swap
>
> Folks for the Home-Potters Moms Pot Swap:
>
> George Debikey contacted me about the mom's pot swap
> and has offered us a room at lunchtime on Saturday.
>
> Just go to the lunch provided and get your lunch and
> meet us in the room indicated by the sign,
> "Potter/Mom's Lunch".
>
> There will be lunch provided on Saturday, although the
> brochure doesn't say that.
>
> Our swap can include ANYTHING you have been able to
> get done, pot or jam included. As fellow moms, we get
> that you might be on hiatus from making clay at the
> moment, so feel free to swap what you like (No kid
> stuff though, this is for a grown up day out).
>
> This informal lunch is seriously informal! So just
> show up with something to trade in a bag. The
> Potter's Council Swap is unrelated and I am sure clay
> things are required for that. So if you are doing
> both, remember to keep your items seperate!
>
> If you are in town and not attending the conference,
> same deal but bring your own lunch.
>
> Thanks to George for accommodating us and I'm looking
> forward to meeting everyone at the conference. I
> don't expect there to be more than a dozen of us,
> tops, so be sure and come on over to exchange emails
> and meet other potters doing it from home for a while,
> menfolk definitely included and welcome.
>
> Elizabeth
>
>
> Elizabeth Priddy
>
> Beaufort, NC - USA
> http://www.elizabethpriddy.com
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 10:38:48 -0400
> From: Ann Baker
> Subject: Re: drying....what am I missing???
>
> Uh, "Phil in Las Vegas". That was a lot of good info but don't you =
> think 3 drying rooms seems a bit excessive? Unless someone is a major =
> production potter it seems to me that is a lot of hoopla for drying some =
> pots. Are you an engineer by any chance? Actually though, you did give =
> me some good points to think about for helping my sculptures dry more =
> evenly!
>
> Ann B
>
>
> Ann Baker Studio
> www.annbakerstudio.com
> 331 Old Tory Trail
> Aiken, SC 29801
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 07:47:27 -0700
> From: Wayne Kilburn
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ??
>
> Hi, Carl,
>
> As the one who made the "cluncky" comment quoted
> below, I must clarify my reason for sending the post.
> I have no interest in changing anyone's mind regarding
> their operating system of choice. My only concern is
> to clarify factually inaccurate statements, based on
> outdated information that were made in Lee's original
> post.
>
> This should not be construed by any means as trying to
> sway anyone's purchasing decision or as a personal
> attack on any individual. I agree with you that
> Maurice's post should have been sent off list.
>
> To summarize:
>
> 1. Mac clones were an experiment that failed in the
> mid-1990's. Apple has no incentive to repeat the
> experiment.
>
> 2. OS X does not run on non-Mac hardware at this time.
> Some individuals have hacked OS X to run on a non-Mac
> machine, but it is not stable or easy to do, and you
> don't get any tech support from Apple for such
> installations.
>
> 3. There are plenty of software offerings for the Mac,
> both by major companies and small. Upgrade delays were
> at one time prevalent, but the market has generally
> evened out. There are even a fair number of Mac-only
> offerings on the market.
>
> 4. Over the past few years hundreds of viruses, trojan
> horses, spyware and adware have been released on the
> net. During that same period, 2 Mac viruses have been
> released.
>
> 5. Apple is in on danger of going out of the computer
> business. The reports that I have seen indicate that
> their profits and customer satisfaction numbers are
> quite strong.
>
> By all means, I agree with your advice - find a
> software package and operating system that suits your
> needs. Use it, love it, go forth and be fruitful. But,
> please at least get the facts right when evaluating
> other products.
>
> As a side note, according to the Seattle Times,
> Microsoft is becoming quite interested in how
> aesthetics can drive sales. The article is available
> at:
> http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=vistadesign11&date=20060911&query=microsoft
>
> Wayne Kilburn
> Lake Stevens, WA
> --------------------------
>
> "it just doesn't make sense to abandon (what one
> Clayarter called) my "clunky" Windows interface, even
> if it spares me the onerous task of running an
> anti-virus program once a week."
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 10:35:01 -0400
> From: Gay Judson
> Subject: Re: glazing/clay frustration
>
> Thanks to the many who have contributed their thoughts on my dilemma. The
> consensus seems to be that the clay is still releasing gasses from burning
> impurities. I am about to refire the pieces that came out such a mess to
> a
> little higher temperature and see if the glazes smooth out. And then I am
> going to fire the next bisque firing longer, slower. See if I can catch
> the
> villan! What an incredible resource this group is. I am AGAIN most
> greateful for the generously shared wisdom here at Clayart!
> Gay Judson, San Antonio, TX
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 15:17:12 +0000
> From: "dwichman@frontiernet.net"
> Subject: Re: Commercial Cone 6 glazes
>
> I feel your pain..... Pottery is really a mixture of science, skill,
> and art. You spend hours and hours (happily, of course) learning the
> way clay and your hands respond to each other, and when you begin to
> get the clay to cooperate, you realize there is so much more to learn
> in getting control of glazing. Even in using commercial glazes, the
> difference in the fired look of the glaze from clay to clay, thick to
> thin, etc. is amazing. Then you decide to paint some glaze over what
> you are using and can get beauty or the beast, or at worst, ruined kiln
> shelves.
>
> I also, feel that I am not at the point where I can make my own glazes,
> though I hope to someday. In the meantime, I have found that some of
> the Laguna Glazes are quite reliable and somewhat flexible as far as
> working on several clays and I can order them in dry form from Davens
> Ceramic Center in Atlanta. I also use some Opulance glazes from Mid
> South Ceramics in Nashville and have had good luck with them on almost
> any clay, though they are a bit more expensive.
>
> By the way, I also really disliked glazing for a long time. It takes
> as much practice to learn to glaze something in the best practical way
> as it does to make a good pot. Once you've done it as many times as
> you have made a pot, it gets easier and you get to appreciate and enjoy
> it as part of the process....(at least this has been my experience...)
>
> Debi Wichman
> Cookeville, TN
> http://www.elementterra.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 11:03:29 EDT
> From: Veena Raghavan
> Subject: Re: Clayart-signing posts
>
> Dear Ivor,
>
> Good idea. The problem with most URLs is that they do not contain the name
> of
> the person posting. Thus, my request.
>
> Veena
>
> In a message dated 9/13/2006 5:22:52 AM Eastern Standard Time,
> iandol@WESTNET.COM.AU writes:
>>
>> Dear Veena,
>>
>> Using your URL after you name is really superfluous since this is given
>> at
>> the top of your message !.
>>
>> Why not follow my example ?
>
> VeenaRaghavan@cs.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 00:13:49 -0700
> From: Fredrick Paget
> Subject: Re: Lid shrinking more than the opening in bisque firing.
>
>>On 9/7/06 8:47 PM, "Lynn Goodman Porcelain Pottery"
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I think it has to do with the comparable size/thickness of the
>>> different parts, and probably a difference in the amount of water
>>> absorbed by the different parts (the lid is thinner, and therefore
>>> absorbs relatively more water).
>>
>>May have a little to do with it, but I think more than water is the
>>orientation of the clay particles and how that affects shrinkage.
>>
>>
>>-- William "Bill" Schran
>
> That could be it. I sort of hand built that lid as a purely thrown
> lid was not coming out in four attempts. The gallery is about 8
> inches in diameter.
>
> I was trying to get a slight dome shape and kept getting it too high
> - sort of bowl shaped. Since I had the last one to where it measured
> right I fan dried it for a couple of hours on the slowly rotating
> wheel . Then I cut off and saved the rim and discarded the bowl shape
> (Actually I made a shallow bowl out of it).
>
> Then I got a lump of the same clay I was using and made a round slab
> out of it by the Chinese pounding method using the Chinese clay
> beater/mallet that I got from Po.
>
> (I have seen how they beat the clay into a slab when making Yixing
> teapots and also on a much larger scale making garden planters of 5
> gallon size.)
>
> You beat the clay with the curved side of the mallet and it moves
> outward. You finish off with the flat side of the mallet. I got a
> nice slab about 1/4 inch thick and transferred it to a hump mold
> mounted on the wheel.
>
> I spun it up on the wheel and threw it down on to the curve of the
> hump then with needle tool cut it round and fan dried it so i could
> lift it off and transfer it to the flat bat with the rim on it after
> scoring and slipping the edge threw it to fit down, made a knob for
> the top.
>
> It came out well and after drying to the same leather hard state as
> the pot,fitted well, a tiny bit loose. Then after drying ,I fired the
> lid and pot - Lid on_ to cone 04. That is when it shrank so the lid
> is about 3/4 inch too small.
>
> It must have been that beating the clay got that oriented the clay
> particles so they shrank more. Also when beating a slab you can use
> drier clay so the lid top clay may have been drier than the throwing
> clay of the pot body, I really can't remember.
> Fred
> --
> From Fred Paget,
> Marin County, CA, USA
> fredrick@well.com
>
> Charter Member Potters Council
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 09:15:15 -0500
> From: Dyann Myers
> Subject: Gas Kiln for Sale
>
> $11,000/best offer
> 38 cubic foot sprung arch, soft-brick (primarily) car kiln
> Designed and built by Donovan Palmquist of Master Kiln Builders
> forced air burners & blower
> 3 years old
> Hudson, Wisconsin (Twin Cities MN area)
> buyer must dismantle and haul away
>
> You can see photos on my website http://www.dyannmyers.com/Kiln.html
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 11:21:57 -0400
> From: "O. Leslie Greeman"
> Subject: Response to Laurence re: warping plates
>
> I have done little slab work and worked with earthenware rarely. However,
> ipicked up a tip from Paul Soldner at a workshop he put on some years ago
> in Cincinnati, OH.
>
> He advised plate makers to wrap the rims of their pieces with
> plastic;allowing the centers to dry first. His rationale is that the form
> will dry from the edges to the center. That is from thiner to thicker
> material. As this occurs the outer rim of the plate shrinks faster than
> the center causing the form to war and or crack.
>
> Since hearing this I have routinely dried plates in this fassion.
>
> It Works! I do not make a great many sets of dishes becaust they are
> difficult to sell.
> However, my losses to pre and post fireing malformations have been
> dramatically reduced.
>
> Hope this helps
> OLG
> ________________________________________________________________________
> Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and security
> tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from across the web,
> free AOL Mail and more.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 11:15:26 -0400
> From: Lili Krakowski
> Subject: Misc:Pinholes, Throwing Sticks;Talent: Stirring Story (Manganese)
>
> Pinholing is a misery, with a number of possible causes.
>
> You write that the glazes have done fine on another body, and are ok on
> the
> test tiles. You fired The Other Clay to the same cone
> in glazing, but it was NOT mature. The present clay is vitrified. So
> there
> are perceptible differences in the bodies. Fine.
>
> Clay bodies are mixtures of materials. The two bodies in question may
> contain
> different materials.
>
> A possible pinhole cause comes from organic materials in the body
> components, and the fineness or coarseness of the clay.
> You might start by
> slowing your bisquing way way down, to allow organic materials to
> burn out before the surface tightens up too much. We worry, rightly,
> about steam from the residual water in the pot plus the chemical
> water in the clay. But forget that organic matter
> in the clay needs plenty of time and opportunity to burn out.
> Otherwise it burrows it's gassy way through the glazes, leaving pinholes.
> (Cooper points out that organic matter burning out puts the body into
> reduction.)
>
> You say some of the pinholes are like craters. That suggests serious
> gas formation, not enough time and temp for the glaze to heal well. Also
> some colorants will make a glaze more refractory (needing a higher
> glaze firing temp) and some produce quite a bit of gas.
>
> So a change in firing cycle might help.
>
> There is a possibility --well beyond my expertise, however--that an
> ingredient in
> your clay body--which you tell you were warned not to fire over co.5,
> but are taking to co.6--is beginning to decompose at co.6. I would find
> that strange, because bodies generally are formulated to do ok on either
> side of the cone for which they are designed, but it is possible.
>
> Then the two bodies may accept glaze differently. The pinholes just
> might
> come from the glaze application. The test tiles may do ok because the way
> you apply glaze to them is more compatible with the body. Your might want
> to experiment with applying the glaze in different ways, and with the
> glaze
> itself, the liquid slop, thicker and thinner. I have found that the
> dampness/dryness
> of the bisque plays a part in application success.
>
> And then...and let no one tell you this never happens, because every old
> potter has war stories--there may be something amiss with the batch of
> that
> clay body that you got. The boxes may have code numbers, check, call, ask
> for a box from another batch.
>
> A true story: A potter whose work was extremely prim, proper, pristine
> used
> a just-off-white clay. One day the supplier (now gone, no one
> you would know, and certainly not the blessed, wonderful Jack Wolfe)sent
> a mislabeled batch of speckled clay. By the time the disaster was
> noticed,
> the speckles had found their way into his recycling bin! Neither
> apologies,
> nor refunds could make up for the time lost, orders deliveries postponed
> etc.
> Test each new batch before integrating it into the studio....
>
>
> A hint: Think of your clay body as you would of bread. Think of the kiln
> as your toaster. Raisin bread needs different toaster treatment/time than
> rye; White Italian bread needs a different time in the toaster than a
> bagel...and so
> on....
>
> THROWING STICKS are fun, and our very own Ivor wrote a lovely piece in PMI
> a while ago--Ivor, please tell us date--about making one's own. Meanwhile
> get a few old wooden kitchen spoons at the thrift shop. You can whittle
> them to your taste, or use them as is....
>
> The throwing suggestions you have been given all are perfect. When
> people
> say slow the wheel down--they mean SLOW. Mine runs at about 40 revolutions
> per minute when I am throwing...a bit more when trimming. Throw as dry as
> you can...and leave plenty of clay at the top before you start collaring.
>
>
>
> TALENT: A quote from Frans Wildenhain: "Everyone has talent. Nobody
> wants
> to work!" Talent or no talent, what makes the potter is work, work, work,
> and work. (Or why I must get going).
>
> STIRRING STORY: The reaction as you have been told would not be to
> the manganese...but what are the other ingredients? Could you have a
> reaction to
> one of them?
>
> Another war story. When I was a young student I mixed a whole bucket of a
> wood ash
> glaze with my bare arm. I was not attentive to the fact that the ash was
> unwashed. My
> arm felt a bit funny while I was stirring. It emerged from the bucket
> with
> a bright red
> opera-length glove. I had that peeling glove for easily a week--till I
> grew new skin.
> Ain't used no unwashed ash since!
>
>
>
> Lili Krakowski
> Be of good courage
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 11:19:00 -0400
> From: kathy forer
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ??
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lee Love
>
> It will make the OS affordable soon. If Mac goes belly up, hopefully
> they will continue as an OS so it isn't as risky to own one.
> -------------------------
> It's curious why you would characterize the venerable yet thoroughly
> revitalized Mac OS as "unaffordable." The latest release of OS X "Tiger"
> (next to be "Leopard") costs about $130 for single user and $200 for
> multi-computer 'family pack'. That's hundred fifty dollars less than the
> Windows OS (XP Pro $280 at Amazon).
>
> The perception that Windows costs less is a result of its dependency on
> OEM/System Builder manufacturer bundling it with cheaper (dare I call it
> inferior?) hardware.
>
> An Apple computer will also thrive for many years after the usual
> expendable PC cycle has consigned your latest three year old grey box to
> the garbage.
>
> As for Apple going under... I guess you've never seen an iPod, heard about
> iTunes nor read the financial pages.
>
> www.apple.com
>
> iTV: www.macworld.com/news/2006/09/12/itv/index.php.
>
> See top story (or search 'Apple') at www.businessweek.com
> Why you even consider to purchase anything from a such a "moribund"
> company?
>
> Hey, but I'm just drinking the koolaid.
> Kathy Forer
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 11:43:27 -0400
> From: Fred Parker
> Subject: Clayboss Wheel Resolution?
>
> I have published the latest, and probably last, update on the continuing
> saga of problems I have had since purchasing a Creative
> Industries "Clayboss" wheel. It is on my blog at
>
>
> I'd like to make it emphatically clear that my reason for publishing this
> information is not to throw rocks at Creative Industries or anyone there.
> Until I bought this wheel I knew nothing about the company. I still don't
> know much.
>
> But I have learned a lot about the specific Clayboss wheel I bought and
> paid for. It might be typical, or it might be unique. I honestly do not
> know that. What I summarized on the blog is no more and no less than what
> my experience with this purchase has been. I know Clayart has many
> beginning potters. In fact, I am one of them. I am sharing my
> experiences in hopes what I have learned might be useful to other potters.
>
> Fred Parker
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 12:27:07 -0400
> From: "Edouard Bastarache Inc."
> Subject: Re: Glaze Calculation
>
> Cliff,
>
> do you know the name of the method used to
> calculate the COE?
>
>
> Later,
>
>
> Edouard Bastarache
> Le Franšais Volant
> The Flying Frenchman
>
> Sorel-Tracy
> Quebec
> edouardb@sorel-tracy.qc.ca
> www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
> http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
> http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/30058682@N00/
> http://thepottersshop.blogspot.com/
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "cliff daniels"
> To:
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 10:11 PM
> Subject: Glaze Calculation
>
>
>> Hi everyone,
>> So I have this Glaze Calculation Software, and
>> if
>> it is ever going to be anything other than a
>> glaze recipe database, I need to learn how to
>> use
>> it. I have this recipe which is somewhat
>> appealing, but which had a note that said COE is
>> low, raise to at least 65. Use less Talc,
>> increase sodium, Magnesium, and potassium.
>>
>> Original Recipe:
>>
>> Gerst.Bor. 99 31
>> Talc 14
>> Custer Feld. 20
>> EPK 5
>> Silica 30
>> add RIO 15
>>
>> This is what I came up with.
>> GB 99 30
>> Talc 10
>> Custer 27
>> Silica 22
>> Whiting 6
>> add RIO 15
>>
>> Of course I haven't tested it yet. Si:Al is
>> 10.74
>> Al is .275, Si is 2.95, MgO is actually lower,
>> but CaO and K2O are higher. COE is 65.4. These
>> all seem to be acceptable ranges, but are there
>> things I am missing?
>>
>> Any feedback?
>>
>>
>>
>> The Mud Man
>> Clifford Daniels
>> 1 Calvin Coombs Rd.
>> Colrain, MA 01340
>> 413-624-0251
>> mudmanpottery@yahoo.com
>>
>> __________________________________________________
>> Do You Yahoo!?
>> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
>> protection around
>> http://mail.yahoo.com
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or
>> change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
>> reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 12:22:18 -0400
> From: dalecochoy
> Subject: Re: kiln shed
>
> I certainly wouldn't use the roofing from steel shed kits ala HD/Lowes
> UNLESS LOTS of braceing. It is like steel toiletpaper. I think they had a
> contest to see who could make it thinest and still actually have a sheet!
> :>)
> My outside gas kiln shed is a 10'X14' from one of those places. It's a
> two-man job ( really should have more) to assemble without collapse, and,
> once started, Finish before you quit. If theres a storm....you'll have
> your
> steel toilet paper all over the neighborhood! :>)
> Dale
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "L. P. Skeen"
> To:
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 5:25 PM
> Subject: Re: kiln shed
>
>
> Hey Jude, have you been to Home Despot or Lowe's? They usually have metal
> roofing in several colors. I like the idea of the hinged roof, although
> not
> sure how practical it might be. I would, however, be sure to paint the
> wood
> parts with some of that fire paint that mel uses....or maybe some ITC. ;)
>
> L. P. Skeen, Summerfield NC
> Get your 2007 Clay Lover's Calendar at
> http://www.living-tree.net/calendar.htm
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: je motzkin
> To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 2:14 PM
> Subject: kiln shed
>
>
> Next weekend I plan to build a shed over my gas kiln. I am working on a
> design for this that might include a hinged roof made of metal roofing on
> a
> wood frame, so that I can open it when hot or smoky. I cannot find metal
> roofing in this part of the country. Any suggestions?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 12:34:53 -0400
> From: LindaC
> Subject: Clay Expressions-Mom Swap
>
> Dear Elizabeth, Thankyou for organizing the swap--I'll be there and happy
> to
> get a chance to meet you and other Clayarters/clayheads. Running hard to
> prepare to get on the road from Mentor near Cleveland, seven hours
> straight
> driving to Indy. See you tomorrow night, travel safely, Linda Haibara in
> Ohio
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 13:05:36 -0500
> From: Ron Roy
> Subject: Re: the public's understanding of paperclay
>
> Hi Maurice,
>
> I think you are right to be concerned - I have test results from clays
> that
> have paper added - and can compare with the same clays without paper
> added.
>
> In every case - even thought the paper version is the same clay -
> vitrified
> properly - the paper clay well absorb about 3 times the water in an
> absorption test.
>
> I suppose it's because the channels left from the burned out paper fiber
> are connected.
>
> The up shot is that paper clay will probably leak if the glaze surface is
> not perfect - like crazed or pinholed. I expect it will get hot in a
> microwave if there is water present in the clay from washing etc.
>
> Easy enough to test for if anyone wants to know.
>
> RR
>
>
>>I assume that the fired paperclay body can be vitreous, perhaps
>>depending on the amount and type of paper used. But I've seen some
>>paperclay pots, allegedly fired to the same cone as the same or
>>similar body without paper, that at least had "issues" with their
>>usability as functional pots exposed to significant water.
>>
>>So, by issues, I mean either because they were vessels contains
>>liquids by their nature, or they were soaked in water in a sink or
>>dishwasher, they "weeped" or absorbed too much water to be safely
>>(alright, comfortably) microwaved.
>
> Ron Roy
> RR#4
> 15084 Little Lake Road
> Brighton, Ontario
> Canada
> K0K 1H0
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 13:05:29 -0500
> From: Ron Roy
> Subject: Re: Iron red glaze on web site
>
> I like Bills attitude about giving the information about this glaze - if I
> could just add a few comments to expand on what he has said.
>
> The expansion of this glaze - without the iron - is very low - some might
> be tempted to use it as a clear glaze or just add a small amount of
> colouring oxide. In that case it would be wise to test carefully for
> shivering and dunting on any clay bodies you are using and on any new clay
> bodies you start using.
>
> RR
>
>
>
>
>>A few folks contacted me about the ^6 iron red glazed pot on my web site.
>>
>>I decided not to include the recipe on my web site because it is not a
>>stable glaze for functional ware.
>>
>>It is a glaze that was listed as part of an article in Ceramics Monthly
>>several years ago as part of an investigation in creating iron reds at ^6
>>in
>>an oxidation firing.
>>
>>Here's the recipe:
>>
>>^6 Iron Red
>>Gerstley Borate - 54.88
>>Talc - 14.63
>>Silica - 30.49
>>Red Iron Oxide - 21.95
>>
>>As you can see, this glaze contains no clay, relying on the GB to hold it
>>in
>>suspension.
>>I would usually add a couple tablespoons of soda ash to large batches to
>>keep the glaze from gelling too much.
>>
>>A second firing at bisque temps (usually just included some pots in a
>>bisque
>>firing) would yield more reddish colors.
>>
>>
>>-- William "Bill" Schran
>
> Ron Roy
> RR#4
> 15084 Little Lake Road
> Brighton, Ontario
> Canada
> K0K 1H0
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 11:57:29 -0500
> From: Craig Clark
> Subject: Re: the public's understanding of paperclay
>
> Judy, follow the link in the post below. It will explain a great many
> things about paper clay and the history thereof. The grahamhay site will
> also give you links to other sources of info on the subject. For a
> definitive read consult and/or purchase "Paper Clay" by Rosette
> Gault.....follow this link to one of many sources for the
> book........http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/14102.html
>
> Hope this helps
> Craig Dunn Clark
> 619 East 11 1/2 St
> Houston, Texas 77008
> (713)861-2083
> mudman@hal-pc.org
>
>
> ..Smith, Judy wrote:
>> I am new to ceramics and only have a slight understanding of what paper
>> clay is. Do you have a good recipe for making paper clay or do you know
>> where I can get more information about this medium?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Judy Smith
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Craig Clark
>> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 6:37 PM
>> To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>> Subject: Re: the public's understanding of paperclay
>>
>> Meryl, you will run into the folks who automatically think paper
>> mache whenever they read paper+clay. A short description of what paper
>> clay is would help to inform those who would like to know. I like to
>> call it "magic clay" because of all the stuff that you can get away when
>> working with it.
>> It really isn't all that new though. It has been around in different
>> forms for a very long time. As far as the comtemporary widespread
>> application and use of paper clay goes, much of the credit belongs to
>> Rossette Gault. She is the one who did pretty extensive research back in
>> the early 1990's. For a brief history from a 2004 symposium on the
>> subject just follow the
>> link....http://www.grahamhay.com.au/hay2006update.html
>> Hope this helps
>> Craig Dunn CLark
>> 619 East 11 1/2 St
>> Houston, Texas 77008
>> (713)861-2083
>> mudman@hal-pc.org
>>
>> .curtis adkins wrote:
>>
>>> Hi,
>>> Are you making it or buying it premade...maybe just tell them the
>>>
>> process ...ie ^5 or ^10 stoneware or porcelain some folks just don't
>> need to no anymore than what it isa for and how much it costs!
>>
>>> Curtis "Monk" Adkins
>>> Miami, OK
>>> Meryl Ruth wrote: Hi, I went to an opening where
>>>
>>
>>
>>> I had pieces of my work on display yesterday. This was the first time
>>>
>> I was showing work I had created from paperclay. I have previously only
>> worked in stoneware and porcelain. Anyway we overheard two women
>> discussing one of my pieces made of paperclay. One woman said, "What is
>> paperclay?" And the reply of the second woman was, "I think that means
>> paper mache`."
>>
>>> The public is not educated regarding paperclay. Do I display
>>>
>> information about this relatively new medium along with my work or is
>> there another name for paperclay that can be used so it is not
>> misrepresented as paper mache`. I wouldn't want folks to think my
>> teapots were created from paper mache`. Not too functional!
>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Meryl Ruth, Porcelain Grace
>>> http://www.merylruth.com
>>>
>>> ______________________________________________________________________
>>> ________ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>>
>>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>>
>>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>>>
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>> ______________________________________________________________________
>>> ________ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>>
>>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>>
>>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>>>
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________________
>> ______
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 13:05:32 -0500
> From: Ron Roy
> Subject: Re: Glaze Calculation
>
> Hi Clifford,
>
> Good for you for asking.
>
> First - your revision only totals 95 without the iron is that correct?
>
> Your alumina and silica levels are down so you have changed the way the
> glaze will look by doing that - and you made it unstable because the
> alumina is lower than recommended. You also lowered the MgO enough to make
> a difference as well.
>
> If you look at the expansion of that glaze with the iron included you will
> see - the expansion is not all that low.
>
> If someone had asked me to raise the expansion of that glaze a significant
> amount I would say it's not possible and have the same result - I would
> simply say - make sure the iron is in it to keep the expansion at a safe
> level.
>
> It is always a good idea to test any glaze you think has to low an
> expansion with the clays you are using - there are some clays on the
> market
> that will dunt and/or shiver with this glaze - even with the iron in it.
>
> Let me know if you need any help with glaze calculation - I think it's a
> good idea to have potters around that can do it.
>
> RR
>
>>Hi everyone,
>>So I have this Glaze Calculation Software, and if
>>it is ever going to be anything other than a
>>glaze recipe database, I need to learn how to use
>>it. I have this recipe which is somewhat
>>appealing, but which had a note that said COE is
>>low, raise to at least 65. Use less Talc,
>>increase sodium, Magnesium, and potassium.
>>
>>Original Recipe:
>>
>>Gerst.Bor. 99 31
>>Talc 14
>>Custer Feld. 20
>>EPK 5
>>Silica 30
>>add RIO 15
>>
>>This is what I came up with.
>>GB 99 30
>>Talc 10
>>Custer 27
>>Silica 22
>>Whiting 6
>>add RIO 15
>>
>>Of course I haven't tested it yet. Si:Al is
>>10.74
>>Al is .275, Si is 2.95, MgO is actually lower,
>>but CaO and K2O are higher. COE is 65.4. These
>>all seem to be acceptable ranges, but are there
>>things I am missing?
>>
>>Any feedback?
>>
>>
>>
>>The Mud Man
>>Clifford Daniels
>>1 Calvin Coombs Rd.
>>Colrain, MA 01340
>>413-624-0251
>>mudmanpottery@yahoo.com
>>
>>__________________________________________________
>>Do You Yahoo!?
>>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>>http://mail.yahoo.com
>>
>>______________________________________________________________________________
>>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>>melpots@pclink.com.
>
> Ron Roy
> RR#4
> 15084 Little Lake Road
> Brighton, Ontario
> Canada
> K0K 1H0
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 10:21:22 -0700
> From: Steve Slatin
> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>
> Ivor --
>
> I have Nelson and did mix a VERY small batch (100 g) from his
> recipe --
>
> frit 3110 -- 20
> flint -- 10
> EPK -- 15
> Spodumene -- 15
> F-4 Feldspar -- 15
> Ball Clay -- 25
>
> It handles 'sticky' but so far no taffy-pulling. I wonder if Nelson
> left out a step involving adding additional Na?
>
> I'm going to try Vince P's scheme of adding sodium silicate and
> soda ash to wet clay next. Maybe having it rest for a week or
> two will make a difference. I was literally scraping the bottom
> of my F-4, so if it doesn't work I need to get a new bag of the
> stuff to try again. And I really need to gear up production for
> the next show, and stop experimenting ...
>
> Steve Slatin
>
> Ivor and Olive Lewis wrote:
> Dear Steve Slatin,
> AS I said earlier, read Ed 4 of Glen Nelson. Shows good illustrations of
> "pulled taffy"
>
> Once you have your deflocculated your clay allow the water to evaporate
> until you get a stiff sludge.
>
> Or use the recipe I gave to Vince for an experiment but mix your
> defloccing agents in your water and cut the mass of water down to about
> 10%. Let stand for 24 hours then mix. If you need more water spray with an
> atomiser.
>
> Best regards,.
>
> Ivor Lewis.
> Redhill,
> South Australia.
>
> ---------------------------------
> Get your own web address for just $1.99/1st yr. We'll help. Yahoo! Small
> Business.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 13:40:06 -0400
> From: "L. P. Skeen"
> Subject: calendar countdown...
>
> Just a couple of weeks left until the calendar is printed, and the =
> discounted price goes away until next year.... I can't wait to see the =
> thing in person! (This year I'm saving one for me.)
>
> L. P. Skeen, Summerfield NC
> Get your 2007 Clay Lover's Calendar at =
> http://www.living-tree.net/calendar.htm Wholesale pricing available on =
> orders of 10 or more copies.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 11:50:36 -0700
> From: nils lou
> Subject: Re: CLAYART Digest - 9 Sep 2006 to 10 Sep 2006 (#2006-243)
>
> I'll try to answer your questions RE: MFT
> M-board is compressed ceramic fiber and is available in sheets 1" X 24"
> X=20
> 36". Cut to fit desired damper size (9" X 15" ). One sheet is about
> $50.=20
> Soak in liquid silica and fire to C06.
> The flame trench and tuning system in the MFT is designed to allow=20
> extremely even firings. A C10 reduction firing typically uses about 30=20
> gallons of LPG. I have used as little as 19 and as much as 40.
> You can certainly place pots on the cart bed and post on up. Make sure=20
> there is no obstruction of the exit flue. Use stack sleeves for stack=20
> insulation especially if you use thin walled steel. Sleeves and M-board
> are =
>
> available from Smith-Sharpe in Mpls, MN. No hood should be used or needed.
> Preferred burner is the SK-1ss propane. 500,000 Btu each burner. price
> for=20
> the two burner system with safety is $800, including shipping. Hope this
> is =
>
> helpful. Nils
> --On Monday, September 11, 2006 12:00 AM -0400 Automatic digest
> processor=20
> wrote:
>
>> There are 49 messages totalling 2394 lines in this issue.
>>
>> Topics of the day:
>>
>> 1. Thixtropic clay (6)
>> 2. Cat Cave Ripple Marks, Olof meets a Porcupine, YouTube ceramics (2)
>> 3. Muse of Fire: The Ceramic Figure now online
>> 4. How to hang ornaments (3)
>> 5. runny glaze
>> 6. some glaze chemistry
>> 7. Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ?? (2)
>> 8. Tall Orders promptly filled: Attn: Brad (3)
>> 9. Free Pottery DVD (2)
>> 10. =
> =3D?ISO-8859-1?Q?Re:=3D20=3DA0=3D20=3DA0=3D20=3DA0=3D20Re:=3D20family=3D20of=
> =3D20matt=3D20?=3D
>> =3D?ISO-8859-1?Q?glazes?=3D
>> 11. Nice article related to the Manual Arts
>> 12. Making Totems (4)
>> 13. Dear Bonnie Staffel-hope you do get to share China pics
>> 14. Lizella clay and the ACC at UF (2)
>> 15. 9 fingered man
>> 16. drying (9)
>> 17. re; RUNNY GLAZE
>> 18. supporting local business
>> 19. Tall Orders promptly filled
>> 20. Building a MFT
>> 21. Looking for Kelly Swope
>> 22. Colored Clay Workshop in NC?
>> 23. Terra SIG?
>> 24. how much does 5lbs of dry glaze yield?
>> 25. FW: Tucson Arizona Casita for rent/pottery studio near by
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 15:52:37 +0930
>> From: Ivor and Olive Lewis
>> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>>
>> Dear Ron Roy,,
>>
>> You are confusing my understanding of the behaviour of clay.
>>
>> As I was given to understand many years ago, thixotropic substances were
>> =
> =3D
>> generally solid in nature but when agitated or subject to mechanical =3D
>> stress they tended to become fluid. Thixotropic was particularly applied
>> =
> =3D
>> to household paints that remained solid in the can until stirred by the =
> =3D
>> brush. Once the agitation stopped they immediately solidified again on =
> =3D
>> the bristles of the brush. When paint was applied to the wall or ceiling
>> =
> =3D
>> it fluidised and flowed to give a good smooth textureless surface =3D
>> without running or dripping.
>>
>> Are you saying that adding a deflocculant to a clay will allow this to =
> =3D
>> happen ? Another thing, are those bags of hard solid clay that I drop on
>> =
> =3D
>> the floor to soften them actually in the deflocculated and not the =3D
>> flocculated state ? I ask this because I thought the fact that they =3D
>> softened indicated that the clay was thixotropic. But from what you say,
>> =
> =3D
>> this must be incorrect because they have no added alkali.
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> Ivor Lewis.
>> Redhill,
>> South Australia.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 06:23:06 -0500
>> From: Gary Navarre
>> Subject: Cat Cave Ripple Marks, Olof meets a Porcupine, YouTube ceramics
>>
>> Hay Crew,
>>
>> Rick took Willy and me out to a place along the bluffs by Pine Creek
>> where there is supposed to be a cougar den. While hiking he explained
>> some of the geology that took place when this was an ancient subduction
>> zone around the precambrian era. Some rocks show the ripple marks left
>> along the ancient beach of the sea that once covered this area. These
>> rocks are 4.5 billion years old and I added them to the end of this;
>>
>> http://public.fotki.com/GindaUP/ca/ggm/glzrks/
>>
>> and I also picked up a few to set in the front of the pignose foundation
>> in
>>
>> http://public.fotki.com/GindaUP/ca/kpap/upsmrkc/
>>
>> Some of the other bolders were found in the woods around the kiln.
>>
>> Olof had himself a learning experience Labor Day morning ( 1:00 AM when
>> the nearby vets were closed). Dianne from pets did say he was big on
>> brawn but not on brains. Seems he has a pentient for things that scurry
>> through the woods. I was training him to nudge the door open to get in
>> the house, prepairing him to scratch the door to let me know he wants in,
>> and he did it a time or two. Then he came in justa snortin and swatting
>> his snout full of baby Porcupine quills. If the sight of blood makes you
>> squemish don't go here;
>>
>> http://public.fotki.com/GindaUP/family/oap/
>>
>> A potter from Southern Califounia calling himself "caieros" started a
>> youtube group "Ceramics" and invited me to join. There's about 25 people
>> and about 90 videos so far. Here is the link if you care to check it out;
>>
>> http://www.youtube.com/group/ceramics
>>
>> I'm thinking I took to youtube cause unlike GoogleVideo it seems to be
>> more dialup friendly what ever that means. Still it takes 3 hours to post
>> 2 minutes but maybe that will change on my end soon. In fact I just
>> posted a companion video to Cat Cave Ripple Marks (somewhere in the link
>> below).
>> Still faster than the 3 days it took to make this. Real quick doesn't
>> exist for me anymore so I just stay in there, eh?
>>
>>
>> G in Da UP
>> Navarre Pottery
>> Navarre Enterprises
>> Norway, Michigan, USA
>> http://public.fotki.com/GindaUP/
>> http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=3DGindaUP
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 08:02:38 -0400
>> From: John Hesselberth
>> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>>
>> On Sep 9, 2006, at 9:26 PM, Vince Pitelka wrote:
>>
>>> I do not claim to be an expert on this, but I am certainly not
>>> about to
>>> accept the statement that "all clays are thixotropic," unless you can
>>> explain to me how that could be possible. I think I understand the
>>> concept
>>> of thixotropy, and it simply does not apply to normal plastic clay.
>>> - Vince
>>
>> Vince, I don't think you understand the definition of thixotropic.
>> You are being too black and white about it. The term simply applies
>> to materials which become less viscous when subjected to an applied
>> stress. There are all degrees of thixotropic behavior. You are used
>> to thinking it is a very dramatic change in viscosity, but it can be
>> a very tiny one. And the underlying cause is not specified in the
>> definition of the word. If the material "shear thins" or becomes less
>> viscous under applied stress it is thixotropic.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> John
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 22:52:08 -0400
>> From: Charlie Cummings
>> Subject: Re: Muse of Fire: The Ceramic Figure now online
>>
>> Many many thanks to Don for driving a couple of hours out of his way
>> to come to the reception this evening. The reception was well
>> attended, the food and wine were great, and it was nice to meet a new
>> person from clayart.
>>
>> Charlie
>>
>> At 08:29 PM 9/7/2006, you wrote:
>>> As it happens, I plan to be in northern Indiana on Saturday,
>>> and just may be able to make it to the opening. Any other
>>> Clayarters besides Charlie planning to be there?
>>>
>>> Don Goodrich
>>> goodrichdn@aol.com
>>>
>>> http://dongoodrichpottery.com/
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________________
>>> ______ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>>
>>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>>
>>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>> Charlie Cummings Clay Studio & Gallery
>> 4130 South Clinton Street
>> Fort Wayne, IN 46806
>> Charlie@claylink.com
>> 260-458-9160
>> www.claylink.com
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 23:15:31 -0400
>> From: Bunny Lemak
>> Subject: Re: How to hang ornaments
>>
>> Hi Judy-
>>
>> You can get something called a "U pin" for your ornaments. It is high
>> fired wire, shaped in a U, and you simply put it in your wet clay, fire
>> it - as many times as needed, and it will stay and hold up your ornament.
>>
>> You can find these U-pins at www.Nationalartcraft.com or I do believe
>> www.loudavis.com has it also.
>>
>> If you need any more help, let me know-
>>
>> Bunny
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 20:29:41 -0700
>> From: Kathryn Hughes
>> Subject: Re: runny glaze
>>
>> I understand toxicity issues with barium and I'm hearing about lithium.
>> Now I'm caught off guard by chrome oxide, as I use that in a glaze to
>> produce reds. Is it safe to come in contact with food and drink after
>> firing? Is the same for Manganese and lithium? thank you! Kathryn In NC
>>
>> Ron Roy wrote:
>> Hi Michele,
>>
>> The total of all the ingrediants in your glaze is 535 without the chrome
>> =
> -
>> is that correct?
>>
>> Adding more clay will eventually stop the running - but I'm sure the =
> glaze
>> wsill change.
>>
>> This is a very unstable glaze by the way - I hope you are not using it
>> where food acn be incontact with it.
>>
>> There are toxicity issues with Lithium, Barium and Chrome and all the
>> ingredianys in this glaze will leach out when in contact with acidic
>> foods.
>>
>> Chrome is volitile during firing by the way - I hope your kiln is vented
>> properly and you are not breathing fumes while firing you work.
>>
>> RR
>>
>>
>>> I just posted this but with my old email address so I'm posting it again
>>> correctly..
>>>
>>> I love this glaze but it's running more than I like. How do I reduce the
>>> running but keep the same lovely glaze?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Michele
>>> damicomichele@comcast.net
>>>
>>> Neph Sy 120
>>> Lithium Carbonate 65
>>> Whiting 15
>>> Barium Carb 115
>>> Ball clay 15
>>> Flint 155
>>> Fritt 3124 50
>>> Chrome OX 2.5
>>
>> Ron Roy
>> RR#4
>> 15084 Little Lake Road
>> Brighton, Ontario
>> Canada
>> K0K 1H0
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Do you Yahoo!?
>> Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 20:41:00 -0700
>> From: Kathryn Hughes
>> Subject: Re: some glaze chemistry
>>
>> Thank you so much, Tom, for the information! I have been out of the loop
>> for quite awhile and am getting back into the swing of information about
>> chemicals.My first thought after reading your message is "This man is a
>> walking wikipedia!" LOL Again, thanks for the info. With warm regards,
>> Kathryn in NC
>>
>> Tom Buck wrote: Kathryn Hughes:
>> Perhaps you may benefit by obtaining a copy (via the WWW) of the
>> Periodic Table of The Elements. It would show that the elements of Group
>> =
> I
>> include the alkali metals: Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K),
>> and others. And Group 2 lists the alkaline earth metals: Beryllium (Be)
>> (not used in claywork), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium, (Ca), Strontium (Sr),
>> Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra) (not used).
>> Basically, the Table assembles similar elements in a Group, going
>> from low atomic weight, to high atomic weight. So, within modest limits,
>> an element low in weight can sub for an element higher in weight, or the
>> other way around, high for low.
>> Both Na & K are common is our daily lives: NaCl (common table
>> salt), KCl (potassium chloride which is used medically when a patient is
>> consuming too much NaCl and must lower its consumption). Sodium carbonate
>> (soda ash) is often encountered, and it produces a highly alkaline
>> solution in water, quite similar to lye (NaOH, sodium hydroxide).
>> Potassium behaves similarly. So it shouldn't be a surprise that Lithium
>> compounds will behave in a like fashion, although Lithium Carbonate (the
>> compound often used by potters) has low (but not zero) solubility when
>> used in a recipe and then water is added to make the glaze mix (a =
> slurry).
>> If the slurry is left standing for some days/weeks, it could be come =
> quite
>> alkaline and harm flesh. This doesn't happen with Na & K materials =
> because
>> (other than soda ash or potash) we use feldspathic materials to source Na
>> & K in our recipes, and these materials have extremely low solubility.
>> In some recipes, the need to lower expansion/conraction of a
>> fired glaze requires that some Na &/or K be replaced with Li feldspar or
>> Lithium Carbonate. If the substition is modest, the recipe will yeild a
>> satisfactory fired glaze; however, if too much Li compound is used, then
>> shivering will occur (the glaze contracts too much).
>> as for the alkaline earths: Calcium compounds are the standard,
>> and give solid results in most cases. yet some special effects can be
>> achieved with Ba compounds (eg, high Ba will cause copper to make a blue
>> glaze, not the usual green effect). and glaze mixes that depart from
>> glossy surfaces, that is, a matte surface is sought, then the matte =
> effect
>> can be achieved by using extra Ca, or extra Mg, or subbing either of
>> these, with Sr or Ba. The difference between Ba & Sr is that Sr++ ions =
> can
>> be handled by the body with little ill-effects should the fired glaze be
>> affected by materials that cause Sr++ ions to form and migrate to the =
> food
>> we eat. This is not the case for Ba++ ions; if ingested as such the ions
>> may result in the body being poisoned.
>> as a basic rule, always use Ca materials in glazes for Cone 6 or
>> lower when making food-ware. some lesser amount of Mg materials or Sr
>> materials can be used in Cone 6 mixes and mixes of Cone 10/+. and
>> generally most potters accept the use of Ba materials only when the glaze
>> will go on surfaces that will not come into contact with food.
>>
>> til later. peace. Tom B.
>>
>>
>> Tom Buck ) -- primary address.
>> "alias" or secondary address.
>> tel: 905-389-2339 (westend Lake Ontario, province of Ontario, Canada).
>> mailing address: 373 East 43rd Street, Hamilton ON L8T 3E1 Canada
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Get your email and more, right on the new Yahoo.com
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 23:49:03 -0400
>> From: John Post
>> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ??
>>
>> Lee,
>> What is the source of your information that Mac will be an operating
>> system that can run on clones?
>>
>> John Post
>>
>>> But that also means that window machines will more easily run the
>>> Mac OS. What it comes down to, is that Mac will be an operating =
> system
>>> like Linux and Windows and not a physical computer. It will make it
>>> more
>>> affordable.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 20:48:17 -0700
>> From: Kathryn Hughes
>> Subject: Re: Tall Orders promptly filled: Attn: Brad
>>
>> Just so that I understand because I have alot of damaged neurons in the
>> brain, if the recipe calls for LiCa2,I can substitute spodomene or
>> petalite instead? Also, I'm hearing that chrome oxide and manganese is
>> also toxic to touch. Are they toxic leaching from fired clay? I do alot
>> of functional pottery. Much thanks! Kathryn in NC
>>
>> Daniel Semler wrote: Hi Karen,
>>
>>> I'm a newbie hear. Are you saying that Lithium carbonate is
>>> poisonous? What about strontium carbonate? so what would make a good
>>> substitute for barium carbonate? Is lithium safe in the fired
>>> stage? Thanks! Kathryn In NC
>>>
>>
>> Lithium carbonate is toxic yes. I've read that lithium compounds are
>> toxic but the lithium felsdspathoids are never mentioned as being
>> toxic. In fact the reverse. So spodumene is my general choice for
>> lithium oxide, though petalite can also be used. That said lithium
>> carb apparently causes issues if too much is used in a glaze anyway -
>> over about 2% I think. I have yet to finish my literature search on
>> this one.
>>
>> Strontium carb is non-toxic and is a fine sub for barium carb in many
>> cases. Calcium carb can be subbed but if you have a bunch of calcium
>> oxide in the glaze already it may be better to use the strontium.
>>
>> Thanx
>> D
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great
>> rates starting at 1=A2/min.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 23:29:20 -0400
>> From: Bunny Lemak
>> Subject: Re: Free Pottery DVD
>>
>> On Sat, 9 Sep 2006 16:40:06 -0700, j isaac
>> wrote:
>>
>>> i followed the directions and heard nothing back.... Is it me
>>>
>>> Marvin Kitshaw wrote: Id love one but I
>> couldnt acess your site (must be me) so if you could send one Lovley!
>>>
>>>>
>>> Thanks in advance
>>> Marv
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
>> I (thought) I followed directons too, but haven't heard back either.
>>
>> What are we doing wrong??!!
>>
>> Bunny
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 20:58:02 -0700
>> From: Nancy Braches
>> Subject: Re: How to hang ornaments
>>
>> Judy
>>
>> Are you only glazing one side? There are hangers available for the kiln
>> and hanging them allows you to glaze both sides as well as keeping the
>> hole open and free from glaze. They use a high temp wire.
>>
>> Nancy
>> Hilltop Pottery
>>
>> "Smith, Judy" wrote: I am making a bunch of
>> Christmas ornaments to sell at an October crafts fair. I need
>> suggestions on how to make the ornaments hangable. The ornaments are
>> fairly small so that they won't weigh too much. I was thinking that a
>> hole in the clay may close with shrinkage and then clog with glaze. With
>> Fimo ornaments I use a wire from a paper clip, but I am afraid that the
>> wire will melt when the clay is fired. Any
>> suggestions would be appreciated.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Judy
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Get your email and more, right on the new Yahoo.com
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 00:49:55 EDT
>> From: Brad Carter
>> Subject:
>> =
> =3D?ISO-8859-1?Q?Re:=3D20=3DA0=3D20=3DA0=3D20=3DA0=3D20Re:=3D20family=3D20of=
> =3D20matt=3D20?=3D
>> =3D?ISO-8859-1?Q?glazes?=3D
>>
>> Ron,
>>
>> Yes, the first glaze only totals 89. In fact, in the original ClayArt
>> string of messages on this glaze, one sender noted this and questioned if
>> something might be missing.
>>
>> I may be attending your class at Mother Earth Clay--have not signed up
>> yet. If so, I'll bring samples of these glaze tests to show.
>>
>> Brad Carter
>> Grass Valley, Calif
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 22:01:30 -0700
>> From: pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET
>> Subject: Nice article related to the Manual Arts
>>
>> http://www.thenewatlantis.com/archive/13/crawford.htm
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Love,
>>
>> Phil
>> el v
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 01:06:06 -0400
>> From: Teresa Wooden
>> Subject: Making Totems
>>
>> I am wanting to make a couple of garden totems, about four feet tall, of
>> several pieces stacked. I am planning on using a hollow metal rod about
>> 3/4 inch width to stack them on. I'm kinda' stumped on the best way to
>> make a base that will be stable enough to hold these things up without
>> tipping... the standard "step in" rod base (like on bird feeder poles)
>> doesn't seem like it would be strong enough, especially in cultivated
>> ground like a flower garden.
>>
>> Also wondering about whether I should pad the top of the pole with a
>> rubber ball or some-such, and whether I should provide any kind of
>> padding (rubber discs?) between peices.
>>
>> Anybody have any experience with this type of structure or any ideas? I
>> would surely appreciate any pointers.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Teresa Wooden
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 01:32:33 -0400
>> From: LindaC
>> Subject: Dear Bonnie Staffel-hope you do get to share China pics
>>
>> Dear Bonnie, It would be so good if you have time to go through your many
>> slides of China and put some pics up for us to see. We who have not been
>> to China in the past will never be able to see it as it was, due to the
>> changes it has undergone....Best regards, linda/Ohio
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 09:45:49 -0400
>> From: William & Susan Schran User
>> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>>
>> On 9/10/06 8:02 AM, "John Hesselberth" =
> wrote:
>>
>>> The term simply applies
>>> to materials which become less viscous when subjected to an applied
>>> stress. There are all degrees of thixotropic behavior. You are used
>>> to thinking it is a very dramatic change in viscosity, but it can be
>>> a very tiny one. And the underlying cause is not specified in the
>>> definition of the word.
>>
>> I recall reading about thixotropic clay in Ceramics Monthly many years =
> ago
>> while in school and mixing up a batch.
>>
>> With the clay that I mixed, there was a dramatic change in the =
> consistency
>> when at rest and then agitated.
>>
>> When agitated/disturbed the clay became runny, much like hot lava,
>> requiring a mold to support a desired shape. Yet when allowed to rest,
>> undisturbed, it retained the shape as a "normal" moist clay, but also
>> retaining the surface as it was in the "wet" state.
>>
>> Here's some examples:
>>
>> http://www.claytonbailey.com/blob.htm
>>
>> http://www.worsleyschool.net/science/files/thixotropic/materials.html
>>
>> And a related study of clay bodies:
>>
>> http://www.ceramicindustry.com/CDA/Articles/Feature_Article/fcd8eaeeba25d
>> 010 VgnVCM100000f932a8c0____
>>
>>
>> -- William "Bill" Schran
>> Fredericksburg, Virginia
>> wschran@cox.net
>> wschran@nvcc.edu
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 10:19:14 -0400
>> From: Roy or Marcey Sherman
>> Subject: Lizella clay and the ACC at UF
>>
>> Boy- does the mention of Lizella clay bring back memories. It is the
>> first clay I l threw with when I worked at the Arts and Crafts Center at
>> the University of Florida in the '80's. They had leisure (non-credit)
>> classes in a variety of arts and crafts open to the university folks,
>> then the community at large on a space available basis. In Beginning
>> clay we started with basic hand building and ended with a few sessions of
>> wheel work. Intermediate and Advanced wheel could only be taken after
>> the Beginning class. Lizella is not very plastic as Fred mentions. And
>> lots of grog! I remember learning not to center with the sides of my
>> hands on the wheel head because the grog would take off skin. But it is
>> pretty forgiving for beginners because it can take lots of water without
>> collapsing. Fired to 06-04 it was a nice orange but can be fired higher
>> as well. I remember making some great Halloween pumpkins with hats for
>> lids. It does improve with age so if you can let it sit for a few months
>> it will help the plasticity. We had 2 buckets for recycling clay-
>> Lizella and the ^6 stoneware we used. Always used to have some cross
>> contamination from students who weren't paying attention and the addition
>> of the stoneware clay did make it easier to throw. I know because as a
>> student assistant I could recycle (by hand- no pug mill) all the clay I
>> wanted for my personal use. Dry it out on big plaster bats and wedge
>> away. Cut and slap was very useful! The Laguna stoneware was definitely
>> better for throwing. Each student got a #25 bag included in class
>> registration, plus the use of the class glazes and firing.
>>
>> The 2 different potters I worked for there taught me a lot about basic
>> studio practices- Jill Keezer (now the director), and Mary Ann Cole.
>> Hated cleaning out the clay trap but taught me why a studio sink needs
>> one. Used a respirator mixing glazes- they would do the weighing- I
>> would add the water, they didn't want me to be responsible if something
>> wrong went into the glaze. Scrapped and washed kiln shelves, made cone
>> packs and kiln gods, helped load and unload kilns, setting up the vents
>> for the kiln room. Also learned the basics of weaving, basketry, black
>> and white photo development, stained glass, jewelry, including loss wax
>> casting (my hubby and I cast our wedding rings there), drawing and
>> painting as well. Just checked out there website while typing this-
>> http://www.union.ufl.edu/acc/. If you're in the area look them up- good
>> people.
>>
>> Marcey Sherman
>> Zephyr Pottery.... 1/2 way out Long Island where there is a definite
>> feeling of fall in the air today.
>>
>>
>>> From: "Fred Parker"
>>> To:
>>> Sent: Friday, September 08, 2006 4:11 PM
>>> Subject: Lizella clay
>>
>>
>>> I recently got some Lizella clay and have been trying to work with it.
>>> (For anyone unfamiliar with it, Lizella is a small town in middle =
> Georgia
>>> where this stuff is mined. I think a major use is in brickmaking.) I
>> was
>>> wondering if anyone has experience with it, and especially, if anyone =
> has
>>> any suggestions for working with it -- like additives to make it a bit
>>> more plastic. Mine tends to break easily in handbuilding. I tried it =
> on
>>> the wheel, and assume it is definitely not a throwing clay because of =
> its
>>> grog content and removal of a good portion of the skin on my hands.
>>> Although I haven't seen it fired yet, I live nearby -- less than a
>> hundred
>>> miles from Lizella -- so I'd like to figure out some way to use it if
>>> possible.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Fred Parker
>>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 10:31:25 -0700
>> From: bea pix
>> Subject: Re: 9 fingered man
>>
>> was looking up this bandaid for you and found this for me
>> http://www.jnj.com/news/jnj_news/20041130_154430.htm
>>
>>> I found these really great bandages they are called Advancer
>>> bandages, and are made by Johnson & Johnson. A totally new kind of
>>> bandage. They are expensive but well worth it. Check them out. Norman
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 07:39:20 -0700
>> From: j isaac
>> Subject: drying
>>
>> I would like to know what people use for drying there pottery. I have
>> been using bags but it is not working out well. I was thinking of putting
>> plastic up on the front of a 3 sided enclosed shelf. Does this sound like
>> it would work? Does it need to be almost or completely air tight?
>>
>> The Pretend Potter
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Get your own web address for just $1.99/1st yr. We'll help. Yahoo! Small
>> Business.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 09:52:01 -0500
>> From: Daniel Semler
>> Subject: Re: Tall Orders promptly filled: Attn: Brad
>>
>> Hi Kathryn,
>>
>> Lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) provides a great deal of lithium oxide, =
> =3D20
>> but nothing else. Well not that makes it into the fired product. It =3D20
>> may be possible to sub it out with spodumene or petalite but in some =
> =3D20
>> cases, but this will depend on the glaze. This is because spodumene =3D20
>> and petalite are more complex materials containing alumina and silica =
> =3D20
>> and traces of other stuff. This is most readily handled using =3D20
>> calculation. If you have an example glaze we could do an example. I =3D20
>> just don't know enough about the toxicity and leaching issues here. =3D20
>> That's why Edouard's post was so interesting. It seems with decent =3D20
>> handling there should be no major toxicity problem with lithium =3D20
>> carbonate. (But don't take my word for it, investigate it if it =3D20
>> worries you.) The same is true of many toxic glaze materials. Most =3D20
>> glaze books just say toxic or non-toxic about materials. Its apparent =
> =3D20
>> that a good deal more detail would be helpful in making an informed =3D20
>> assessment.
>>
>> There are two basic issues of toxicity for glaze materials as I see =
> =3D20
>> it currently - anyone, feel free to leap in and thump me. The first is =
> =3D20
>> in handling of the raw unfired materials. The second is in the =3D20
>> leaching of toxic materials - usually heavy metals - from the fired =3D20
>> product during use.
>>
>> I'm not a toxicologist and I don't know specifically, in the case =
> =3D20
>> of either manganese or chrome oxide, anything concerning toxicity to =
> =3D20
>> the touch. I do know that they can leach from glazes and that they =3D20
>> fume during firing. Check the archives regarding chrome oxide as there =
> =3D20
>> has been a bunch of discussion of this. Also you could check out =3D20
>> Monona Rossol's book (The Artist's Complete Health and Safety Guide) =
> =3D20
>> as it discusses metals and metal compound toxicity. She does not in =3D20
>> one place (p16) allergic skin or respiratory reactions can occur with =
> =3D20
>> chrome compounds but does not specify which reaction (skin or =3D20
>> respiratory or both) nor which compound. She has several entries on =3D20
>> chrome compounds.
>>
>> This is not necessarily a big deal if the materials are handled =3D20
>> properly, there being a big difference between a material being toxic =
> =3D20
>> and someone actually being poisoned by it.
>>
>> Basically sensible handling of glaze materials should be adequate =
> =3D20
>> for most of them. By this I mean using a decent and properly fitting =
> =3D20
>> respirator that will prevent you from inhaling the inevitable dusts. =
> =3D20
>> For more toxic materials such as barium and some others, use gloves =3D20
>> when your working with them, particularly if you have any open cuts on =
> =3D20
>> your hands at the time. Clear up any spills as you go. Don't eat/drink =
> =3D20
>> while mixing glaze. If you use a respirator this is a natural thing as =
> =3D20
>> its hard to get coffee through the mask :) When you're done change and =
> =3D20
>> wash your clothes to keep dust etc. down in the house. The biggest =3D20
>> thing with most of the materials is the fine dust. Oh and with =3D20
>> anything toxic, like say barium carb, store it safely. I store my =3D20
>> barium carb. in a locked cabinet.
>>
>> In the fired product leaching of materials from the glaze can only =
> =3D20
>> really be tested for to know for sure. The composition of the glaze is =
> =3D20
>> extremely important in minimising leaching of substances from the =3D20
>> glazes. It is possible to create glazes containing toxic agents, eg. =
> =3D20
>> lead, and have them be safe for functional use. I have for example had =
> =3D20
>> a copper red glaze containing barium carb tested for leaching and it =
> =3D20
>> leached only a tiny amount - some water supplies have more barium in =
> =3D20
>> them. So it all depends. The best write up on this that I know of is =
> =3D20
>> in John Hesselberth's and Ron Roy's Mastering Cone 6 Glazes. If you =3D20
>> are worried about any specific glazes you can get them tested.
>>
>> To return to your specific question I do not know whether leached =
> =3D20
>> chrome or manganese metals from glazes are toxic or not. It does not =
> =3D20
>> sound good. Of course it would depend on how much leached. Most of the =
> =3D20
>> toxicity stuff I've heard on these is related to the raw material =3D20
>> handling or to fuming during firing. Anyone know ? (John H. and Ron R. =
> =3D20
>> do test for chromium leaching in at least one case, so I'd at least =3D20
>> investigate it, if you use the glaze for food use.)
>>
>> Also, apologies if my digression into materials handling and so on =
> =3D20
>> was unnecessary.
>>
>> Thx
>> D
>>
>>
>>> Just so that I understand because I have alot of damaged neurons in =
> =3D20
>>> the brain, if the recipe calls for LiCa2,I can substitute spodomene =
> =3D20
>>> or petalite instead? Also, I'm hearing that chrome oxide and =3D20
>>> manganese is also toxic to touch. Are they toxic leaching from fired =
> =3D20
>>> clay? I do alot of functional pottery. Much thanks! Kathryn in NC
>>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 11:17:15 -0400
>> From: "L. P. Skeen"
>> Subject: Re: Cat Cave Ripple Marks, Olof meets a Porcupine, YouTube
>> ceramics
>>
>> Hey Gary, I hope you saved those quills, they make great sgrafitto =3D
>> tools...
>>
>> L. P. Skeen, Summerfield NC
>> Get your 2007 Clay Lover's Calendar at =3D
>> http://www.living-tree.net/calendar.htm
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----=3D20
>> From: Gary Navarre=3D20
>> Then he came in justa snortin and swatting
>> his snout full of baby Porcupine quills.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 11:20:47 -0400
>> From: "L. P. Skeen"
>> Subject: Re: Making Totems
>>
>> Teresa, there is a back issue of PMI from earlier this year (sorry, I =3D
>> don't know EXACTLY which one) which shows how a clayartist makes these =
> =3D
>> really large figurative forms by building them in sections, stacked, =3D
>> with something between each layer (paper? I can't remember) and then =3D
>> fires the sections individually. You can't even tell in the finished =3D
>> product, and they look great. Go have a look at the PMI website (which =
> =3D
>> may be www.potterymaking.org, but I'm not sure) and see if they have =3D
>> that back issue shown.
>>
>> L. P. Skeen, Summerfield NC
>> Get your 2007 Clay Lover's Calendar at =3D
>> http://www.living-tree.net/calendar.htm
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----=3D20
>> From: Teresa Wooden=3D20
>>
>> I am wanting to make a couple of garden totems, about four feet tall, =
> =3D
>> of several pieces stacked.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 10:27:57 -0500
>> From: Snail Scott
>> Subject: Re: Making Totems
>>
>> At 01:06 AM 9/10/2006 -0400, you wrote:
>>> I am wanting to make a couple of garden totems, about four feet tall, of
>>> several pieces stacked. I am planning on using a hollow metal rod about
>>> 3/4 inch width to stack them on. I'm kinda' stumped on the best way to
>>> make a base that will be stable enough to hold these things up without
>>> tipping...
>>
>>
>> A hole with concrete would be best. Just put a
>> slightly larger diameter pipe in the hole before
>> pouting the concrete, and the new pole can just
>> drop into it.
>>
>> If it needs to be portable, consider making a
>> wide base like those used for patio umbrellas.
>>
>> I have also had fair luck (for not-super-heavy
>> work) by using a 3' long, 3/4" spike (sold at
>> construction supply places). Drive it into the
>> ground about 2'. A 1" pipe can then be slid
>> over its exposed stub. A longer spike, like a
>> 5' lightning-rod ground spike, will resist
>> leaning better, but be very tough to remove, so
>> that would be a better method for permanent
>> installation.
>>
>>
>>> Also wondering about whether I should pad the top of the pole with a
>>> rubber ball or some-such, and whether I should provide any kind of
>>> padding (rubber discs?) between peices.
>>
>>
>> I don't see any need.
>>
>> -Snail
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 08:40:29 -0700
>> From: Linda - Pacifica
>> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>>
>> You are reminding me of when I first arrived in San Francisco and was
>> working in a lab at SF General Hospital. Another tech was performing a
>> test done in a bed of suspended resin particles to which a test sample
>> and then current is applied.
>>
>> She showed me the bed of resin, which looked like a bed of dryish sand,
>> like you see at the shore. Then one of the docs came over and gave the
>> bed of resin a sharp lateral knock. It turned to a liquid, jellyish mass
>> and he declared: "That's liquifaction and that's what will happen to all
>> the bay mud when the big one comes." Scared me silly and I vowed to
>> never live on bay mud.
>>
>> Of course that bay mud is clay with lots of organics suspended in water,
>> more or less water at various times of the year.
>>
>> So, I know the geologists call it liquifaction, whether it's clay or
>> sand, but is this also an example of thixotropy?
>>
>> Linda
>> in Pacifica on what passes for rocky ledge in this earthquake zone.
>>
>>
>> On Sunday, September 10, 2006, at 07:26AM, William & Susan Schran User
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On 9/10/06 8:02 AM, "John Hesselberth"
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> The term simply applies
>>>> to materials which become less viscous when subjected to an applied
>>>> stress. There are all degrees of thixotropic behavior. You are used
>>>> to thinking it is a very dramatic change in viscosity, but it can be
>>>> a very tiny one. And the underlying cause is not specified in the
>>>> definition of the word.
>>>
>>> I recall reading about thixotropic clay in Ceramics Monthly many years
>>> ago while in school and mixing up a batch.
>>>
>>> With the clay that I mixed, there was a dramatic change in the
>>> consistency when at rest and then agitated.
>>>
>>> When agitated/disturbed the clay became runny, much like hot lava,
>>> requiring a mold to support a desired shape. Yet when allowed to rest,
>>> undisturbed, it retained the shape as a "normal" moist clay, but also
>>> retaining the surface as it was in the "wet" state.
>>>
>>> Here's some examples:
>>>
>>> http://www.claytonbailey.com/blob.htm
>>>
>>> http://www.worsleyschool.net/science/files/thixotropic/materials.html
>>>
>>> And a related study of clay bodies:
>>>
>>> http://www.ceramicindustry.com/CDA/Articles/Feature_Article/fcd8eaeeba25
>>> d010 VgnVCM100000f932a8c0____
>>>
>>>
>>> -- William "Bill" Schran
>>> Fredericksburg, Virginia
>>> wschran@cox.net
>>> wschran@nvcc.edu
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________________
>>> ______ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>>
>>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>>
>>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>>
>>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 11:32:52 -0400
>> From: "Edouard Bastarache Inc."
>> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>>
>> Hello Vince,
>>
>> one exemple of thixotropic clay is the state in
>> which
>> the underlying clay is before a lanslide.
>> Our province and region are prone to these.
>>
>> A whole village was engulfed by the Saguenay River
>> at the beginning of the 70s. A small earthquaque
>> occurred
>> before and the clay that was thixotropic became
>> fluid and
>> most of the village went down the river. Many
>> escaped
>> and were relocated but, 37 died.
>>
>> Also, if you mix clays by the slurry method you
>> find
>> clays that appear to become thicker with the
>> removal/
>> evaporation of water; then you stir with a stick
>> and it
>> becomes very fluid again.
>>
>>
>> Later,
>>
>>
>>
>> Edouard Bastarache
>> Le Fran=C1ais Volant
>> The Flying Frenchman
>>
>> Sorel-Tracy
>> Quebec
>> edouardb@sorel-tracy.qc.ca
>> www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
>> http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
>> http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/30058682@N00/
>> http://thepottersshop.blogspot.com/
>>
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Vince Pitelka"
>> To:
>> Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 9:26 PM
>> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>>
>>
>>>> I beg to differ. Thixotropy is increased
>>>> fluidity as a result of
>>>> mechanical
>>>> disturbance, particularly shearing forces. If
>>>> deflocculated clays exhibit
>>>> this property to a greater degree, that's fine.
>>>> But normal clays are
>>>> thixotropic, too.
>>>
>>> Bruce -
>>> That still does not correspond to what I
>>> understand, and I do not see how
>>> you can say that normal clays are thixotropic.
>>> They, are not, in any sense
>>> of the word. Thixotropy seems to be primarily a
>>> quality of gels that will
>>> semi or completely solidify when left alone, and
>>> then liquify when agitated.
>>> Normal clay does not do anything like that. If
>>> it has been sitting for a
>>> long time it gets stiffer, for the reasons that
>>> I explained, and then when
>>> mobilized, it returns to a plastic state, but it
>>> does not approach anything
>>> like liquification unless it has become
>>> deflocculated through dissolution of
>>> alkalis into the water of plasticity.
>>> Deflocculated clay of a certain
>>> consistency can be very gel-like, and behaves
>>> with true thixotropy,
>>> semi-solidifying or holding it's shape almost as
>>> soon as movement or
>>> agitation stops.
>>>
>>> To reiterate, normal clays with a neutral or
>>> slightly acidic chemistry are
>>> not thixotropic, and do not behave in such a way
>>> that could be called
>>> thixotropic. Clays that have an alkaline
>>> chemistry (deflocculated clays)
>>> can be thixotropic, because of the gel-like
>>> consistency and behavior.
>>>
>>> I do not claim to be an expert on this, but I am
>>> certainly not about to
>>> accept the statement that "all clays are
>>> thixotropic," unless you can
>>> explain to me how that could be possible. I
>>> think I understand the concept
>>> of thixotropy, and it simply does not apply to
>>> normal plastic clay.
>>> - Vince
>>>
>>> Vince Pitelka
>>> Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee
>>> Technological University
>>> Smithville TN 37166, 615/597-6801 x111
>>> vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu
>>> http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/
>>> http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________________
>>> ______ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>>
>>> You may look at the archives for the list or
>>> change your subscription
>>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>>
>>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
>>> reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 08:52:00 -0700
>> From: Wayne Kilburn
>> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ??
>>
>> Lee -
>>
>> Hi, Lee. I saw your post and as a user who's been
>> using Macs since before they were cool, I need to
>> expand on a few of your points:
>>
>> 1. Even if your specific freeware or shareware program
>> is not availble on the Mac platform, it's highly
>> likely that an equivalent is. Check versiontracker.com
>> under the Mac OS X offerings. Not to mention, often
>> times freebies are included when you purchase a new
>> Mac. Sound Studio was included when I bought my last
>> Mac in 2004.
>>
>> 2. Openoffice available for the Mac. I've installed
>> and briefly tested it. It's fine if you don't mind
>> being stuck with the clunky PC look and feel. Other
>> options are available for the Mac. Sharing files
>> between the two platforms is seamless nowadays. I
>> can't remember the last time a PC user has had
>> difficulty opening one of my files.
>>
>> 3. Don't be so sure about the cheap Mac clones. Apple
>> tried this approach back in the early 90's. The
>> quality of the clones totally sucked, and the bad
>> experience turned off a number of users to Apple
>> entirely. That is only one of the reasons why you see
>> Apple seeking to control all aspects of their product
>> experience - hardware, software, iPods, etc.
>>
>> Plus, Apple has a whole pack of copyright attorneys,
>> and they're not affraid to use them.
>>
>> 4. At this time Apple has indicated that they do not
>> intend to support OS X running on non-Apple hardware.
>> But, then again, Apple is famous for publicly denying
>> an idea while at the same time developing the idea for
>> release. Apparently the OS looks for the presence of a
>> security chip in the hardware. Some of our computer
>> gurus will be more up on this that I am. While it is
>> possible to hack around this (search google, you'll
>> find documentation), many casual users would be
>> comfortable doing this.
>>
>> See a summary at:
>> http://reviews.zdnet.co.uk/software/os/0,39024180,39235916,00.htm.
>>
>> 5. While it is true that Macs have a history of being
>> pricey, that is beginning to change. Similarly
>> equipped Dells are in the same price range as their
>> Mac counterparts nowadays. A number of comparisons
>> have been done.
>>
>> 6. As far as Apple becoming an OS only company -
>> probably not anytime soon, if at all. While Apple is
>> in the 3-4 percent market share range, they're making
>> a very good profit. They seem to be very happy where
>> they are. Much bigger, then you start attracting the
>> attention of virus, spyware and malware authors, plus
>> institutional gridlock kicks in.
>>
>> Side Note not covered in Lee's Post: Running Windows
>> on your Mac exposes you to all the viruses and
>> nastyware that other Windows users are subject to.
>> These pests exploit the software. No matter what
>> machine XP is running on, it will still have all of
>> its current vulnerabilities.
>>
>> Anyhow - just a few observations from a long-time Mac
>> user
>>
>> Wayne Kilburn
>> Lake Stevens, Washington
>> ............................
>> Lee's Post:
>>
>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 17:09:48 -0700
>> From: Lee Love
>> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you
>> ??
>>
>> I use a lot of open source freeware and also
>> inexpesive downloadable
>> software from the internet. Sometimes the freeware
>> is avalible in
>> Linux
>> but the software I need is often not available for the
>> Mac. An
>> example of
>> a program I can't live without is a sound program
>> called Total
>> Recorder, you
>> can read about it here:
>> http://www.totalrecorder.com/
>>
>> My most frequently used open source freeware is
>> openoffice:
>> http://openoffice.org
>>
>> I heard the advice a while ago and I think it
>> is pretty good:
>> First, figure out the software you need to use. Then,
>> buy the computer
>> it
>> runs on.
>>
>> I might own a Mac someday, but I will also use
>> windows. Two
>> things that will help me own a Mac is, that now that
>> they moved to
>> Intell
>> chips, less expensive clones will be available, and
>> also the Mac can
>> run
>> windows. But that also means that window machines
>> will more easily
>> run the
>> Mac OS. What it comes down to, is that Mac will be
>> an operating
>> system
>> like Linux and Windows and not a physical computer.
>> It will make it
>> more
>> affordable.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Lee in Mashiko, Japan
>> http://potters.blogspot.com/
>> "Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
>>
>> __________________________________________________
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>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 09:04:18 -0700
>> From: Kathryn Hughes
>> Subject: Re: Tall Orders promptly filled: Attn: Brad
>>
>> My dear Daniel,do not ever apologize for unnecessary digressions. for me,
>> the more the better> I could literally sit here for hours reading all of
>> this. I have one of the books that you've mentioned and will thoroughly
>> read it instead of looking at the pictures. When I went to Alfred
>> University in the late 80's, Val Cushing (I'm bragging here) was talking
>> about BaCo2and he was talking about acceptable levels and I was thinking
>> that NO amount was acceptable to me. Yes, I know there's more in other
>> places, but why add onto it?There was a story that he told about how one
>> student had her glaze tested by the dept and it was deemed acceptable.
>> she sold alot of pieces with that glaze at the student show. Later that
>> night, she used that same glazed mug to have her tea, left the tea bag in
>> and went to bed. The next morning, the glaze was white, so right then and
>> there, she knew that the dept had made a mistake. The school spent alot
>> of money in the ads and notices that whoever purchase her pieces must
>> not use it for food or drink. It was a nightmare. That story stuck with
>> me. I took over a studio in 2000 and the recipes were left to me. Upon
>> discovering that one contained the dreaded BaCo2, I destroyed all
>> functional pieces of mine with that glaze.Overcautious? Perhaps.
>> Paranoid? Certainly! But I also remember another story that Val told
>> about a colleague ( I forgot his name) who was one of the leading ceramic
>> artist in using gold luster in his pieces. This was years before they
>> found out about the poisonous fumes and no vents. The poor man died of
>> throat cancer. He stressed about the safety of handling and proper
>> venting. this kind of thing cannot be stressed enough! There I go,
>> digressing into the infinity. LOL With warm regards, Kathryn Daniel
>> Semler wrote: Hi Kathryn,
>>
>> Lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) provides a great deal of lithium oxide,
>> but nothing else. Well not that makes it into the fired product. It
>> may be possible to sub it out with spodumene or petalite but in some
>> cases, but this will depend on the glaze. This is because spodumene
>> and petalite are more complex materials containing alumina and silica
>> and traces of other stuff. This is most readily handled using
>> calculation. If you have an example glaze we could do an example. I
>> just don't know enough about the toxicity and leaching issues here.
>> That's why Edouard's post was so interesting. It seems with decent
>> handling there should be no major toxicity problem with lithium
>> carbonate. (But don't take my word for it, investigate it if it
>> worries you.) The same is true of many toxic glaze materials. Most
>> glaze books just say toxic or non-toxic about materials. Its apparent
>> that a good deal more detail would be helpful in making an informed
>> assessment.
>>
>> There are two basic issues of toxicity for glaze materials as I see
>> it currently - anyone, feel free to leap in and thump me. The first is
>> in handling of the raw unfired materials. The second is in the
>> leaching of toxic materials - usually heavy metals - from the fired
>> product during use.
>>
>> I'm not a toxicologist and I don't know specifically, in the case
>> of either manganese or chrome oxide, anything concerning toxicity to
>> the touch. I do know that they can leach from glazes and that they
>> fume during firing. Check the archives regarding chrome oxide as there
>> has been a bunch of discussion of this. Also you could check out
>> Monona Rossol's book (The Artist's Complete Health and Safety Guide)
>> as it discusses metals and metal compound toxicity. She does not in
>> one place (p16) allergic skin or respiratory reactions can occur with
>> chrome compounds but does not specify which reaction (skin or
>> respiratory or both) nor which compound. She has several entries on
>> chrome compounds.
>>
>> This is not necessarily a big deal if the materials are handled
>> properly, there being a big difference between a material being toxic
>> and someone actually being poisoned by it.
>>
>> Basically sensible handling of glaze materials should be adequate
>> for most of them. By this I mean using a decent and properly fitting
>> respirator that will prevent you from inhaling the inevitable dusts.
>> For more toxic materials such as barium and some others, use gloves
>> when your working with them, particularly if you have any open cuts on
>> your hands at the time. Clear up any spills as you go. Don't eat/drink
>> while mixing glaze. If you use a respirator this is a natural thing as
>> its hard to get coffee through the mask :) When you're done change and
>> wash your clothes to keep dust etc. down in the house. The biggest
>> thing with most of the materials is the fine dust. Oh and with
>> anything toxic, like say barium carb, store it safely. I store my
>> barium carb. in a locked cabinet.
>>
>> In the fired product leaching of materials from the glaze can only
>> really be tested for to know for sure. The composition of the glaze is
>> extremely important in minimising leaching of substances from the
>> glazes. It is possible to create glazes containing toxic agents, eg.
>> lead, and have them be safe for functional use. I have for example had
>> a copper red glaze containing barium carb tested for leaching and it
>> leached only a tiny amount - some water supplies have more barium in
>> them. So it all depends. The best write up on this that I know of is
>> in John Hesselberth's and Ron Roy's Mastering Cone 6 Glazes. If you
>> are worried about any specific glazes you can get them tested.
>>
>> To return to your specific question I do not know whether leached
>> chrome or manganese metals from glazes are toxic or not. It does not
>> sound good. Of course it would depend on how much leached. Most of the
>> toxicity stuff I've heard on these is related to the raw material
>> handling or to fuming during firing. Anyone know ? (John H. and Ron R.
>> do test for chromium leaching in at least one case, so I'd at least
>> investigate it, if you use the glaze for food use.)
>>
>> Also, apologies if my digression into materials handling and so on
>> was unnecessary.
>>
>> Thx
>> D
>>
>>
>>> Just so that I understand because I have alot of damaged neurons in
>>> the brain, if the recipe calls for LiCa2,I can substitute spodomene
>>> or petalite instead? Also, I'm hearing that chrome oxide and
>>> manganese is also toxic to touch. Are they toxic leaching from fired
>>> clay? I do alot of functional pottery. Much thanks! Kathryn in NC
>>>
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>>
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>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 09:04:11 -0700
>> From: Steve Slatin
>> Subject: Re: drying
>>
>> The tighter you wrap, the slower things will dry. If you live in the
>> middle of a desert and your daytime temps get to 100 F regularly,
>> you'll need to wrap pretty seriously to keep the clay from drying too
>> quickly and giving you cracking issues and getting too dry to trim
>> overnight.
>>
>> Plastic does two things -- it can trap moisture, and it will stop air
>> currents. Your work will always dry faster if the air is moving.
>>
>> If you live in a more moderate environment and just need to keep enough
>> moisture in your work to keep it from drying a little too quickly you
>> can drape plastic over a shelf and put a wareboard inside and get much
>> slower drying. You'll have to experiment to get what you want, and
>> it will vary by season. In November we get lots of rain and it's cool
>> where I live and I leave my thrown pots out unwrapped for 2 sometimes
>> 3 days to get them dry enough to trim. In summer when it's dry I
>> sometimes throw in the morning and trim in the afternoon.
>>
>> I generally use plastic from the dry cleaner. Open up a bag and it
>> more than covers a large wareboard, if you need to you can double wrap
>> a board (plastic under AND over the work) with one piece of plastic.
>>
>> Best wishes -- Steve Slatin
>>
>>
>>
>> j isaac wrote:
>> I would like to know what people use for drying there pottery. I have
>> been using bags but it is not working out well. I was thinking of putting
>> plastic up on the front of a 3 sided enclosed shelf. Does this sound like
>> it would work? Does it need to be almost or completely air tight?
>>
>> The Pretend Potter
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls to the US (and 30+
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>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 09:11:05 -0700
>> From: Kathryn Hughes
>> Subject: Re: drying
>>
>> When I'm finished with the making of the piece, I always throw a dry
>> cleaning bag over it but keep the bottoms open. This is to let it dry out
>> slowly and not stress crack. Putting the plastic around the 3 sided shelf
>> is not that bad, but it won't slow down the drying more. What it will do
>> , and it's a great idea, mind you, keep the dust off of your pieces.If
>> your pieces are drying too fast, check to make sure it's not in the sun,
>> and not near a vent that can blow air directly onto the piece. Good luck.
>> Also, you're not a pretend potter. You play with clay? You're an ARTIST.
>> Sorry, had to make my bone about that, dear. Prozacs do that to me.LOL
>> Kathryn in NC
>>
>> j isaac wrote: I would like to know what
>> people use for drying there pottery. I have been using bags but it is not
>> working out well. I was thinking of putting plastic up on the front of a
>> 3 sided enclosed shelf. Does this sound like it would work? Does it need
>> to be almost or completely air tight?
>>
>> The Pretend Potter
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Get your own web address for just $1.99/1st yr. We'll help. Yahoo! Small
>> Business.
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls to the US (and 30+
>> countries) for 2=A2/min or less.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 12:19:50 -0400
>> From: Lynne and Bruce Girrell
>> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay
>>
>> Vince wrote:
>>
>>> ... I do not see how you can say that normal clays are thixotropic.
>>
>> Well, before going further with this discussion, it appears that we need
>> to get clear on what each of us means by "thixotropic."
>>
>> If we want to stick with the strict definition of thixtropy/thixotropic,
>> then we are speaking about gels only. If this is the case, then I would
>> think that we would be talking more about suspensions of bentonite and =
> the
>> like instead of formable clays. But if this is the case, then I have
>> completely misunderstood the subject of the discussion and I withdraw my
>> comments. Remember, I did ask what it was that the original poster was
>> trying to demonstrate.
>>
>> On the other hand, the context of the discussion appears to me to =
> indicate
>> that we are using thixotropic in a more general sense, applying the word
>> to plastic mixtures of clay and water (and potentially other additives).
>> In this case we are discussing "materials that exhibit decreased
>> viscosity when mechanically disturbed." Please feel free to provide your
>> own words to help clarify the meaning.
>>
>> In this case, the fact that clay stiffens up as it sits undisturbed and
>> gets noticeably softer when worked is sufficient to call it thixotropic.
>>
>> You state:
>>> If [normal clay] has been sitting for a long time it gets stiffer,
>>> for the reasons that I explained, and then when
>>> mobilized, it returns to a plastic state,
>>
>> You provided a reason, but I expressed great reservation about your
>> explanation. Reiterating the statement does not make it any more valid. I
>> do not see how your concept of migration of the water molcules would
>> stand up to close examination.
>>
>> Your description of the clay particles moving closer together would be
>> analogous to glaze settling in a bucket when left unused for a period of
>> time. Indeed, the particulate portion of a settled glaze does become more
>> viscous and when mixed up again it becomes less viscous. But I see two
>> problems with this explanation:
>>
>> 1) When considering the movement of clay particulates toward one another
>> you must also consider the consequences of that motion. Just as the
>> undisturbed glaze bucket develops a water layer at the surface as the
>> particulate mass agglomerates, clay particles clustering closer together
>> in an undisturbed hunk of clay would also leave a larger space for the
>> water molecules to accumulate in. Unlike the glaze bucket though, there
>> would not be a separate water layer and particulate layer, but rather
>> there would be volumes that are "more clay" and volumes that are "more
>> water". Given this model, I could make an argument for _decreased_
>> viscosity as the water migration occurs, as the mixture would start
>> acting more like a sand/water combination than a clay/water combination.
>> The larger globs of water between the clay particles (larger than when
>> the clay has been recently worked) would provide _increased_ fluidity.
>>
>> 2) What happens when the clay is disturbed? Remember that we already =
> agree
>> that it takes no more than dropping the clay a few times to make it feel
>> dramatically softer. The clay does not have to be wedged, pugged, or
>> otherwise strongly worked to regain its more fluid state. How could your
>> water migration explanation account for this? The water, which was
>> originally between clay particles has been displaced. In order for the
>> original plasticity of the clay to reappear, the water would have to make
>> its way back between the clay particles. If the forces between clay
>> particles were strong enough to displace the water in the first place, it
>> would be very difficult for the water to displace the clay particles and
>> take up its place again to provide the fluidity. While you could make an
>> argument for this happening during wedging, such measures are not =
> required
>> to restore the fluidity of the clay as already noted; all we have to do =
> is
>> slam it a few times.
>>
>>
>> You state:
>>> ... I am certainly not about to accept the statement that "all clays are
>> thixotropic,"
>>> unless you can explain to me how that could be possible.
>>
>> Fair enough.
>> I think we are all on the same page when I say that we are dealing with a
>> system involving charged particles - clay platelets, water molecules, and
>> the ions that you introduce with deflocculants all carry an electrical
>> charge. When left to sit undisturbed for some time, the electrical forces
>> between these various constituents will tend to create weak bonds between
>> them. Nothing gets displaced to any great degree, they just tend to line
>> up with each other.
>>
>> An analogy would be a set of magnets on pivots, close enough to one
>> another to be influenced by the other's field, yet restricted so that
>> they can't actually touch. If you "work" them, by spinning one or both
>> and then allow them to settle they will, after a time, end up aligning
>> with one another. Electrical charges work in a similar way.
>>
>> So after these alignments have set up, it takes some energy to disrupt
>> them. Hence, the clay feels stiffer. Slam the clay a couple of times and
>> enough displacement occurs to disrupt the alignments. Suddenly the clay
>> is softer. The water hasn't gone anywhere. The clay particles haven't
>> gone anywhere. Thus, the clay mass almost instantly regains its original
>> plasticity.
>>
>> What about your deflocculants? All you are doing is throwing a particular
>> type of charged particles into the mix, allowing the effect, as I have
>> described it, to be accentuated. Therefore, you observe a stronger
>> thixotropy effect in such mixtures.
>>
>> To summarize:
>> 1) Are we strictly speaking of gels or not?
>> 2) I feel that your water migration explanation does not adequately
>> explain the observed behavior of clay and I ask you to substantiate your
>> model 3) I feel that I provide an explanation that does adequately
>> explain the observed behavior of clay.
>>
>> Bruce "your court" Girrell
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 17:31:47 +0100
>> From: Marek & Pauline Drzazga-Donaldson
>> Subject: Free Pottery DVD
>>
>> To Marvin Kitshaw and Bunny Lemark and Clayarters,
>>
>> if you have had trouble on the site, then I am sorry but the server was =
> =3D
>> down - shit happens.
>> If at anytime it is down again then just send an email to =3D
>> marek@keramix.com name, email,
>> telephone and Address and I will pop it in the post.
>> Marv and Bunny - yours have been posted today.
>>
>> Happy potting Marek
>>
>>
>>
>> Hand made Architectural Ceramics from No9 Studio UK www.no9uk.com
>> Fully Residential Pottery Courses and more at Mole Cottage =3D
>> www.moleys.com
>> "Tips and Time Travel from a Vernacular Potter" reviews on =3D
>> www.keramix.com
>> an irreverent point of view after 35 years in the game Marek =3D
>> Drzazga-Donaldson =3D20
>> Free Works and Mole Cottage DVD's and Video content on all the sites
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 09:26:57 -0700
>> From: Kathryn Hughes
>> Subject: Re: Lizella clay and the ACC at UF
>>
>> Marcey, thanks for telling us about this. It was enjoyable looking at the
>> website. I'm so jealous that you are on LI That is where I'm from
>> originally-Dix Hills. whereabouts are you? We are still having summer
>> feeling here. Drives me nuts! I miss the fall feelings! With warm
>> regards, Kathryn
>>
>> Roy or Marcey Sherman wrote: Boy- does
>> the mention of Lizella clay bring back memories. It is the first clay I l
>> threw with when I worked at the Arts and Crafts Center at the University
>> of Florida in the '80's. They had leisure (non-credit) classes in a
>> variety of arts and crafts open to the university folks, then the
>> community at large on a space available basis. In Beginning clay we
>> started with basic hand building and ended with a few sessions of wheel
>> work. Intermediate and Advanced wheel could only be taken after the
>> Beginning class. Lizella is not very plastic as Fred mentions. And lots
>> of grog! I remember learning not to center with the sides of my hands on
>> the wheel head because the grog would take off skin. But it is pretty
>> forgiving for beginners because it can take lots of water without
>> collapsing. Fired to 06-04 it was a nice orange but can be fired higher =
> as
>> well. I remember making some great Halloween pumpkins with hats for lids.
>> It does improve with age so if you can let it sit for a few months it =
> will
>> help the plasticity. We had 2 buckets for recycling clay- Lizella and the
>> ^6 stoneware we used. Always used to have some cross contamination from
>> students who weren't paying attention and the addition of the stoneware
>> clay did make it easier to throw. I know because as a student assistant I
>> could recycle (by hand- no pug mill) all the clay I wanted for my =
> personal
>> use. Dry it out on big plaster bats and wedge away. Cut and slap was very
>> useful! The Laguna stoneware was definitely better for throwing. Each
>> student got a #25 bag included in class registration, plus the use of the
>> class glazes and firing.
>>
>> The 2 different potters I worked for there taught me a lot about basic
>> studio practices- Jill Keezer (now the director), and Mary Ann Cole. =
> Hated
>> cleaning out the clay trap but taught me why a studio sink needs one. =
> Used
>> a respirator mixing glazes- they would do the weighing- I would add the
>> water, they didn't want me to be responsible if something wrong went into
>> the glaze. Scrapped and washed kiln shelves, made cone packs and kiln
>> gods, helped load and unload kilns, setting up the vents for the kiln
>> room. Also learned the basics of weaving, basketry, black and white photo
>> development, stained glass, jewelry, including loss wax casting (my hubby
>> and I cast our wedding rings there), drawing and painting as well. Just
>> checked out there website while typing this-
>> http://www.union.ufl.edu/acc/. If you're in the area look them up- good
>> people.
>>
>> Marcey Sherman
>> Zephyr Pottery.... 1/2 way out Long Island where there is a definite
>> feeling of fall in the air today.
>>
>>
>>> From: "Fred Parker"
>>> To:
>>> Sent: Friday, September 08, 2006 4:11 PM
>>> Subject: Lizella clay
>>
>>
>>> I recently got some Lizella clay and have been trying to work with it.
>>> (For anyone unfamiliar with it, Lizella is a small town in middle =
> Georgia
>>> where this stuff is mined. I think a major use is in brickmaking.) I
>> was
>>> wondering if anyone has experience with it, and especially, if anyone =
> has
>>> any suggestions for working with it -- like additives to make it a bit
>>> more plastic. Mine tends to break easily in handbuilding. I tried it on
>>> the wheel, and assume it is definitely not a throwing clay because of =
> its
>>> grog content and removal of a good portion of the skin on my hands.
>>> Although I haven't seen it fired yet, I live nearby -- less than a
>> hundred
>>> miles from Lizella -- so I'd like to figure out some way to use it if
>>> possible.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Fred Parker
>>>
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------
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>> Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 17:35:49 +0100
>> From: Marek & Pauline Drzazga-Donaldson
>> Subject: drying
>>
>> Dear Pretend Potter,
>>
>> are you trying to dry slowly or keep it moist. To dry slowly I wrap with
>> =
> =3D
>> Newspaper first then binbags, for quick drying I wrap in Newspaper and =
> =3D
>> put it in my Drying Room with air turbulators on for a day or two, then =
> =3D
>> take off the Newspaper and continue drying.
>> To keep it moist, then wrap with wet Newspaper and then wrap with =3D
>> binbags.
>>
>> Happy potting Marek
>>
>>
>>
>> Hand made Architectural Ceramics from No9 Studio UK www.no9uk.com
>> Fully Residential Pottery Courses and more at Mole Cottage =3D
>> www.moleys.com
>> "Tips and Time Travel from a Vernacular Potter" reviews on =3D
>> www.keramix.com
>> an irreverent point of view after 35 years in the game Marek =3D
>> Drzazga-Donaldson =3D20
>> Free Works and Mole Cottage DVD's and Video content on all the sites
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 12:58:32 -0400
>> From: Michele D'Amico
>> Subject: re; RUNNY GLAZE
>>
>> Several days ago I posting this question about my runny glaze. FIRST, I
>> want to thank all of the very helpful people who offered solutions to the
>> problem. You are very kind and generous.
>>
>> I also want to add that in retrospect I see that I should have included
>> more information with my original posting.
>>
>> Based on some of the emails I got I realize there are some potters who =
> are
>> searching Clayart for useful glazes but don't have an understanding of =
> the
>> materials.
>>
>> I knew when I posted this glaze that it was unstable and loaded with
>> plenty of toxic materials and should never be used on functional ware. =
> It
>> is purely decorative. I should have included that information on my
>> posting for the sake of those who might consider mixing some up and =
> trying
>> it on a cup (DO NOT DO THAT).
>>
>> Michele
>>
>> *^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*
>> ^*
>>> I just posted this but with my old email address so I'm posting it again
>>> correctly..
>>>
>>> I love this glaze but it's running more than I like. How do I reduce the
>>> running but keep the same lovely glaze?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Michele
>>> damicomichele@comcast.net
>>>
>>> Neph Sy 120
>>> Lithium Carbonate 65
>>> Whiting 15
>>> Barium Carb 115
>>> Ball clay 15
>>> Flint 155
>>> Fritt 3124 50
>>> Chrome OX 2.5
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 13:19:32 -0500
>> From: Dannon Rhudy
>> Subject: Re: Making Totems
>>
>> My students used to make some totems every couple
>> years or so. They used a variety of things to keep the
>> separate pieces from touching one another:
>> Wooden disks they got at the home store; rubber disks
>> from somewhere, small rubber balls with holes cut/drilled
>> through. The most interesting were the ones with the
>> rubber balls, which then became part of the totem.
>>
>> They set theirs in the ground with a bit of quick-set
>> concrete. They used various poles: copper pipe,
>> plastic pipe, rebar. The rebar worked best, was
>> cheapest, and swayed a bit in heavy wind - a nice touch.
>>
>> regards
>>
>> Dannon Rhudy
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 13:20:12 EDT
>> From: Cindy Gatto
>> Subject: supporting local business
>>
>> Hi all,
>> I had wanted to post something about this when the thread was active but
>> =
> I
>> didn't so I would like to say it now. I guess this is directed more to =
> the
>> people in the NYC area. We sell tools, chemicals, etc. We carry Dolan and
>> Kemper tools all chemicals a lot of accessories- esp. for moldmaking No
>> we are not set up for people who want palettes of chemicals but for the
>> person who wants 50-100 lbs or less we are here. Business has been a
>> little slow it has been a rough summer we could use some support Thank
>> you
>>
>> Cindy Gatto & Mark Petrin
>> The Mudpit
>> 228 Manhattan Ave
>> Brooklyn, NY 11206
>> 718-218-9424
>> _www.mudpitnyc.com_ (http://www.mudpitnyc.com/)
>> mudpitnyc@aol.com
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 11:22:21 -0600
>> From: Bonnie Hellman
>> Subject: Tall Orders promptly filled
>>
>> Actually if you are looking for a lot of scientific information about our
>> glaze ingredients, you could do no better than our own Edouard =
> Bastarche's
>> books.
>>
>> There's a review of "Substitutions for Raw Ceramics Materials" at:
>> http://www.ceramicstoday.com/articles/substitutions.htm
>>
>> Also take a look at his: "Toxicology - Ceramics Glass Metallurgy"
>> http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
>>
>> Bonnie Hellman
>>
>> PS These books are available in English, French and possibly other
>> languages.
>>
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Daniel Semler"
>> To:
>> Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 8:52 AM
>> Subject: Re: Tall Orders promptly filled: Attn: Brad
>>
>>
>> Hi Kathryn,
>>
>> Lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) provides a great deal of lithium oxide,
>> but nothing else. Well not that makes it into the fired product. It
>> may be possible to sub it out with spodumene or petalite but in some
>> cases, but this will depend on the glaze. This is because spodumene
>> and petalite are more complex materials containing alumina and silica
>> and traces of other stuff. This is most readily handled using
>> calculation. If you have an example glaze we could do an example. I
>> just don't know enough about the toxicity and leaching issues here.
>> That's why Edouard's post was so interesting. It seems with decent
>> handling there should be no major toxicity problem with lithium
>> carbonate. (But don't take my word for it, investigate it if it
>> worries you.) The same is true of many toxic glaze materials. Most
>> glaze books just say toxic or non-toxic about materials. Its apparent
>> that a good deal more detail would be helpful in making an informed
>> assessment.
>>
>> There are two basic issues of toxicity for glaze materials as I see
>> it currently - anyone, feel free to leap in and thump me. The first is
>> in handling of the raw unfired materials. The second is in the
>> leaching of toxic materials - usually heavy metals - from the fired
>> product during use.
>>
>> I'm not a toxicologist and I don't know specifically, in the case
>> of either manganese or chrome oxide, anything concerning toxicity to
>> the touch. I do know that they can leach from glazes and that they
>> fume during firing. Check the archives regarding chrome oxide as there
>> has been a bunch of discussion of this. Also you could check out
>> Monona Rossol's book (The Artist's Complete Health and Safety Guide)
>> as it discusses metals and metal compound toxicity. She does not in
>> one place (p16) allergic skin or respiratory reactions can occur with
>> chrome compounds but does not specify which reaction (skin or
>> respiratory or both) nor which compound. She has several entries on
>> chrome compounds.
>>
>> This is not necessarily a big deal if the materials are handled
>> properly, there being a big difference between a material being toxic
>> and someone actually being poisoned by it.
>>
>> Basically sensible handling of glaze materials should be adequate
>> for most of them. By this I mean using a decent and properly fitting
>> respirator that will prevent you from inhaling the inevitable dusts.
>> For more toxic materials such as barium and some others, use gloves
>> when your working with them, particularly if you have any open cuts on
>> your hands at the time. Clear up any spills as you go. Don't eat/drink
>> while mixing glaze. If you use a respirator this is a natural thing as
>> its hard to get coffee through the mask :) When you're done change and
>> wash your clothes to keep dust etc. down in the house. The biggest
>> thing with most of the materials is the fine dust. Oh and with
>> anything toxic, like say barium carb, store it safely. I store my
>> barium carb. in a locked cabinet.
>>
>> In the fired product leaching of materials from the glaze can only
>> really be tested for to know for sure. The composition of the glaze is
>> extremely important in minimising leaching of substances from the
>> glazes. It is possible to create glazes containing toxic agents, eg.
>> lead, and have them be safe for functional use. I have for example had
>> a copper red glaze containing barium carb tested for leaching and it
>> leached only a tiny amount - some water supplies have more barium in
>> them. So it all depends. The best write up on this that I know of is
>> in John Hesselberth's and Ron Roy's Mastering Cone 6 Glazes. If you
>> are worried about any specific glazes you can get them tested.
>>
>> To return to your specific question I do not know whether leached
>> chrome or manganese metals from glazes are toxic or not. It does not
>> sound good. Of course it would depend on how much leached. Most of the
>> toxicity stuff I've heard on these is related to the raw material
>> handling or to fuming during firing. Anyone know ? (John H. and Ron R.
>> do test for chromium leaching in at least one case, so I'd at least
>> investigate it, if you use the glaze for food use.)
>>
>> Also, apologies if my digression into materials handling and so on
>> was unnecessary.
>>
>> Thx
>> D
>>
>>
>>> Just so that I understand because I have alot of damaged neurons in =
> the
>>> brain, if the recipe calls for LiCa2,I can substitute spodomene or
>>> petalite instead? Also, I'm hearing that chrome oxide and manganese is
>>> also toxic to touch. Are they toxic leaching from fired clay? I do alot
>>> of functional pottery. Much thanks! Kathryn in NC
>>>
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 10:38:54 -0700
>> From: Craig Clark
>> Subject: Re: drying
>>
>> j isaac wrote:
>>> I would like to know what people use for drying there pottery. I have
>>> been using bags but it is not working out well. I was thinking of
>>> putting plastic up on the front of a 3 sided enclosed shelf. Does this
>>> sound like it would work? Does it need to be almost or completely air
>>> tight?
>>>
>>> The Pretend Potter
>>>
>>> ---------------------------------
>>> Get your own web address for just $1.99/1st yr. We'll help. Yahoo! Small
>>> Business.
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________________
>>> ______ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>>
>>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>>
>>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>>
>>>
>> I suspect that by "not working well" you mean either your pots are
>> cracking or that they are drying before you get a chance to finish them.
>> If this is the case then what you are talking about making, a damp box,
>> may be the solution to your troubles. I suggest that you put up some
>> type of wire mesh (hardware cloth, chicken wire, etc) before putting the
>> plastic over the mesh. You don't have to do this but the plastic will
>> last longer. Also, use as heavy a weight plastic as you are able.
>> Keeping a coupla small bowls with water in them inside the damp box will
>> keep the environment nice and humid as well.
>> Hope this helps
>> Craig Dunn Clark
>> 619 East 11 1/2 St
>> Houston, Texas 77008
>> (713)861-2083
>> mudman@hal-pc.org
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 13:46:19 -0400
>> From: Wayne Seidl
>> Subject: Re: drying
>>
>> Dear Pretender:
>> Um, just a thought or two.
>> If you are shielding the piece(s) from air movement with plastic, you =3D
>> are in
>> essence trying to "contain" the moisture, and not allowing the piece to =
> =3D
>> dry.
>> Are you trying to protect the work from other environmental =3D
>> contamination? =3D20
>> Are you trying to "delay" drying?
>> What are you asking?
>>
>> Best,
>> Wayne Seidl
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of j isaac
>> Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 10:39 AM
>> To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>> Subject: drying
>>
>> I would like to know what people use for drying there pottery. I have =3D
>> been
>> using bags but it is not working out well. I was thinking of putting =3D
>> plastic
>> up on the front of a 3 sided enclosed shelf. Does this sound like it =3D
>> would
>> work? Does it need to be almost or completely air tight?
>>
>> The Pretend Potter
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 11:16:32 -0700
>> From: Ann Brink
>> Subject: Re: drying
>>
>> I use lightweight squares of cloth, and cover pieces with one or more,
>> depending on how slowly I think they need to dry. If something is at the
>> right stage for the next step I add a sheet of plastic over it, until I
>> have time to work on it. I never put plastic directly over the piece; you
>> get condensation drops where you don't want them.
>>
>> Thrift shops are a good source; look where they display women's scarves.
>>
>> Ann Brink in Lompoc CA
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "j isaac"
>> To:
>> Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 7:39 AM
>> Subject: drying
>>
>>
>>> I would like to know what people use for drying there pottery. I have
>>> been using bags but it is not working out well. I was thinking of =
> putting
>>> plastic up on the front of a 3 sided enclosed shelf. Does this sound =
> like
>>> it would work? Does it need to be almost or completely air tight?
>>>
>>> The Pretend Potter
>>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 14:22:09 -0400
>> From: Mud Duck Pottery
>> Subject: Building a MFT
>>
>> I have finally decided on the kiln I want to build. It is going to be =3D
>> Nils Lou's 40ft flat top car kiln. I have the metal cut and I will start
>> =
> =3D
>> wielding up the car and corner braces on Monday and the castors will be =
> =3D
>> here Tuesday.
>>
>> I need to find some M board for the damper. What is M board and where =3D
>> can one find a piece to use for the damper and maybe to plug the burner =
> =3D
>> ports after the firing is complete. Without having to buy an entire =3D
>> sheet.
>>
>> What is the preferred burners to use with this kiln??? Nils if you are =
> =3D
>> out there I wouldn't mind using your burner. Can I get then from you or =
> =3D
>> do I need to contact a distributor???
>>
>> I would like to hear from others that fire this kiln. Do you like it, =3D
>> what would you change about it if anything???
>> Do you like the kiln in general???
>> Does the kiln fire even???
>> How much gas does it use???
>> With a car kiln do you fire pots no the car itself or do you use a shelf
>> =
> =3D
>> first ??? Some one told me the first shelf should be above the flue =3D
>> opening, is this true???
>> Is it necessary to put the insulating sleeves inside the stack pipe or =
> =3D
>> can you just use a 10 inch pipe without the liner??? If you need the =3D
>> liner where do you order that???
>> Do you need a hood on top of the stack to deep the rain out???
>>
>> Thanks for any help and comments!!
>>
>> Gene & Latonna
>> mudduck@mudduckpottery.net
>> www.mudduckpottery.net
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 08:47:32 -0700
>> From: Linda
>> Subject: Looking for Kelly Swope
>>
>> Hello
>> I have a friend who is looking for Kelly Swope. She has a set of dishes
>> made by this person and is interested in more pieces. Does anyone know of
>> this person? Thanks
>> Linda Shields
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls to the US (and 30+
>> countries) for 2=A2/min or less.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 15:08:31 -0400
>> From: Mayssan Shora Farra
>> Subject: Re: drying
>>
>> On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 07:39:20 -0700, j isaac
>> wrote:
>>
>> I would like to know what people use for drying there pottery.
>>
>>
>> Hello J.:
>>
>> I use a mini greenhouse. If you are in the US they could be had from Big
>> Lots for $20. 3 shelves, 18"X24" and wire. so I lay a good thickness of
>> newpapers and then put my wares and zip the cover down it dries slowly =
> and
>> evenly. The only problem that I have not solved is; the wires are too far
>> apart and they leave marks on the bottom of very soft or very heavy pots
>> so for now I put those on boards in it until they are stiff enough to
>> remove the boards.
>>
>> And that is how I do it in Charleston, WV where my studio is too hot and
>> humid in the summer and too cold and dry in the winter.
>>
>> Mayssan
>>
>> http://www.clayvillepottery.com
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 15:32:15 -0400
>> From: Candace Young
>> Subject: Colored Clay Workshop in NC?
>>
>> I swear I saw a listing for a Chris Campbell colored clay workshop in
>> NC. I can't find the posting. Does anyone know about this or was I
>> dreaming? Thanks. Candace
>> Candace Young mailto:candace@bayriverpottery.com
>>
>> Bay River Pottery www.bayriverpottery.com
>> 107 S. Water Street, P.O. Box 394
>> Bayboro, NC 28515
>> 252.745.4749
>> Eastern North Carolina
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 20:28:44 +0100
>> From: Marvin Kitshaw
>> Subject: Re: Terra SIG?
>>
>> Well I may not have been very clear as to what I'm up to....I going to
>> Sagg=3D ar fire, Terra sig, in a Raku kiln with sea salt, sea weed etc =
> and
>> throw in=3D a few oxides and metals and anything else that may look =
> handy.
>> And just wo=3D ndered if any one else had tried this and had any good
>> mixtures that worked=3D well or didn't work so well.=3D20
>> And some times pottery is about wasting time and effort but it is good
>> fun =3D isn't it!
>> Still reading....
>> Marv
>>
>>
>>
>>> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2006 20:44:59 -0500> From: vpitelka@DTCCOM.NET>
>>> Subject:=3D
>> Re: Terra SIG?> To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG> > Marv wrote:> "Im just
>> abou=3D t to venture into the lovely world of Terra sig and salt glaze>
>> together, h=3D as anyone tried this? (course you ave!) and If so any free
>> advice> would be=3D very welcomed indeed!"> > Marv -> I am curious as to
>> why you wish to combi=3D ne terra sig and salt glaze. A true> terra sig,
>> by it's nature, is a very =3D thin coating, and will likely be> =
> completely
>> consumed by the corrosive and =3D solvent salt glaze.> > That said, where
>> the salt deposition is light, the t=3D erra sig might> persevere, and the
>> effect could be nice, but why not accomp=3D lish the same> thing with a
>> standard slip rather than a terra sig? The pri=3D mary reason for> going
>> to all the trouble to make a true terra sig is for t=3D he polishing>
>> capbility, and in a salt firing that would cease to be an iss=3D ue,
>> because> you'll loose any polish that was present before firing. So =
> wh=3D
>> y use a terra> sig?> - Vince> > Vince Pitelka> Appalachian Center for
>> Craft=3D , Tennessee Technological University> Smithville TN 37166,
>> 615/597-6801 x11=3D 1> vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu>
>> http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelk=3D a/> http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/>
>> =
>>
>> _________________________________=3D
>> _____________________________________________> Send postings to
>> clayart@lsv=3D .ceramics.org> > You may look at the archives for the list
>> or change your s=3D ubscription> settings from
>> http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/> > Moderator of=3D the list is Mel
>> Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>> _________________________________________________________________ Be one
>> of the first to try Windows Live Mail.
>> =
> http://ideas.live.com/programpage.aspx?versionId=3D3D5d21c51a-b161-4314-9b0
>> e-=3D 4911fb2b2e6d=3D
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 15:19:59 -0400
>> From: Holly Davis
>> Subject: how much does 5lbs of dry glaze yield?
>>
>> Can anyone out there tell me how much 5 lbs of dry glaze will yield once
>> water is added? Like how much of a bucket it might fill...
>> I am a brand new teacher, trying to order materials for the year...with
>> almost NO money...so I am trying to go for the most stuff at the best
>> value. Thanks in advance.
>> Holly
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 12:56:53 -0700
>> From: curtis adkins
>> Subject: Re: How to hang ornaments
>>
>> Hi Judy,
>> I'm rather new at this but I have found that toothpicks or small dowel
>> pieces work wonders!
>>
>> Curtis "Monk" Adkins
>> Miami, Ok
>>
>> "Smith, Judy" wrote: I am making a bunch of
>> Christmas ornaments to sell at an October crafts fair. I need
>> suggestions on how to make the ornaments hangable. The ornaments are
>> fairly small so that they won't weigh too much. I was thinking that a
>> hole in the clay may close with shrinkage and then clog with glaze. With
>> Fimo ornaments I use a wire from a paper clip, but I am afraid that the
>> wire will melt when the clay is fired. Any
>> suggestions would be appreciated.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Judy
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________________
>> _____ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 13:59:11 -0700
>> From: pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET
>> Subject: Re: drying
>>
>> Hi j,
>>
>>
>> Usually when Potters are talking about drying,
>> they are not saying anything about whether they
>> mean drying evenly, or 'just' drying, which can
>> also mean drying unevenly into an oval or a
>> 'Potatoe chip' other distortions
>> of the form, drying just-enough for further
>> proceedures such as Handles or other appendages,
>> or drying to be correct for formal Trimming to
>> occur, or what...so usually, lacking details or
>> distinctions, the term tends to be pretty vague or
>> confused.
>>
>> So, all this sort of depends on what one is trying
>> to achieve, or achieve intentionally, or achieve
>> well.
>>
>> The traditional 'Damp Room', or Damp Closet, or at
>> least damp box, will allow a clay form to be
>> consistantly even with whatever the ambient
>> humidity is inside the enclosure.
>>
>> Similarly, an enclosure for actual complete (
>> rather than relative) drying, can
>> either permit forms to dry to ambient local
>> humidity of the outside air by mere gentle
>> convection of the outside air entering into the
>> enclosed air, and having some way out also at the
>> top,
>> or, when provided with a dehumidifier, and not
>> provided with aperatures, allows them
>> to dry out completely, and of course more than
>> ambient air's relative humidity would usually be
>> able to do.
>>
>> Unless one can exclude air movement in the
>> enclosure, or regulate the rate and kind of air
>> movement it is, and the humidity of the air
>> itself, forms will tend to dry unevenly, aside
>> from whatever the inherent propensity of the shape
>> may be, to provide it's own distortions or
>> departures from what was originally thrown.
>>
>> If it were me, I would have a Damp Room or Damp
>> Closet anyway, which keeps things, or brings
>> things to, and then keeps them, at the kind of far
>> Leather Hard I prefer for Trimming...
>>
>> And, a second Closet which gently drys them
>> completely, or very close to it, which would have
>> a demumidifier, ( or in my area which has quite
>> low ambient humidity anyway, then merely a gentle
>> slow convection of ambient air spurred on by a
>> Light Bulb or other mild heat source, ) and very
>> slow diffused air circulation.
>>
>> If I did things with Handles or other appendages,
>> I would have a third such Closet if need be,
>> regulated to bring things to, and keep things at,
>> the level of damp I prefer for attatching these
>> appendages, from which the forms would graduate
>> either to the 'Leather Hard' Damp Closet, or the
>> 'To completely dry out" closet...
>>
>>
>> Phil
>> Las Vegas
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "j isaac"
>>
>>
>>> I would like to know what people use for drying
>> there pottery. I have been using bags but it is
>> not working out well. I was thinking of putting
>> plastic up on the front of a 3 sided enclosed
>> shelf. Does this sound like it would work? Does it
>> need to be almost or completely air tight?
>>>
>>> The Pretend Potter
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2006 14:03:14 -0700
>> From: claybair
>> Subject: FW: Tucson Arizona Casita for rent/pottery studio near by
>>
>> Hi All,
>> I'm submitting this for Brenda Beeley
>> I've stayed in her casita.... it's a great space with fabulous views.
>> You'd be a 5 minute walk from 3 potters (Brenda, me &
>> another potter not on Clayart).
>> I've taken classes at the facility 2 miles away. It's a great
>> space 2 electric kilns, 1 gas. It's run really well by Jada Ahern.
>> See details below.
>>
>> Gayle Bair
>> Bainbridge Island, WA
>> Tucson, AZ
>> http://claybair.com
>>
>>
>>
>> SUBJECT; TUCSON CASITA FOR RENT/POTTERY STUDIO NEARBY
>>
>> TIRED OF RAIL, COLD, SLUSH??
>> SPEND THE WINTER IN SUNNY TUCSON!!!
>>
>> BEAUTIFUL SUNNY CASITA FOR RENT in NW Tucson in quiet community.
>> Home of several Clayart potters with a great studio 2 miles away that
>> lowfires and cone 10 gas firing.
>>
>> 1000 sq ft, 1 bedroom, cathedral ceilings, mountain views
>> Completely Furnished
>> washer/dryer, dishwasher, TV/VCR
>> 2 heated swimming pools, spa, tennis courts
>> walking trails, quiet, scenic
>> $1600/ month=D6includes utilities
>> long term lease also available for a lower price
>>
>> Call Brenda (360) 821-8088
>> or email: mtimes@telebyte.net
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.2/442 - Release Date: 9/8/2006
>>
>> --
>> No virus found in this outgoing message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.2/442 - Release Date: 9/8/2006
>>
>> --
>> No virus found in this outgoing message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.2/442 - Release Date: 9/8/2006
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> End of CLAYART Digest - 9 Sep 2006 to 10 Sep 2006 (#2006-243)
>> *************************************************************
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 13:08:26 -0700
> From: Amanda Blum - Howling Zoe Productions
> Subject: Windows, Linux, Mac - separate corners, children.
>
> Honestly, are you guys just the MOST contentious people ever? Reading =
> these
> conversations are aggravating reminders of middle school.=20
>
> Much like the army, my computers do more before 9am than yours do all =
> day. I
> run a design agency, and my three systems (a mac and 2 pcs) are top of =
> the
> line, major investments. I spend months investigating before I put =
> money
> into them, read reports, assess software, etc.=20
>
> Macs are Macs and PCs are PCs. They are apples and oranges, they are =
> meant
> for different people, and simply put, neither is "better" and neither =
> are
> going anywhere. =20
>
> Macs have lots of benefits including the invulnerability to viruses. =
> Point
> to consider: will you be trading items with PC users often? While your
> system won't go down you will more easily pass on viruses to your =
> friends
> since your system won't catch them. With competent virus protection, =
> viruses
> are not the dark evil people make them out to be.=20
>
> Macs don't have as much access to free shareware, you have a harder time
> finding peripherals, and frankly, getting macs fixed is a lot harder. =
> Your
> options are Apple store (where people have actually DIED waiting for =
> help)
> or contracting privately, and there are far fewer mac techs than pc =
> techs,
> and their prices are higher. That said, most mac techs are better =
> trained
> and accredited. =20
>
> While SOME PC's are made of inferior parts (Dell), some are made of good
> parts, and since Macs are now made with Intel parts, frankly, they're =
> made
> of the SAME parts.=20
>
> Arguing over which OS is better is just stupid. They're different, =
> that=92s
> all. Personally, I actually prefer Windows. Some prefer OS10. Nuff said. =
>
>
> Whomever said software should be a consideration was smart, but even =
> that is
> iffy. Reports show that CS2 actually runs better on Windows than OS10, =
> which
> is shocking since Macs have always been the darlings of designers.=20
>
> While Windows can now work via boot camp or parallels, its not solid. =
> First,
> boot camp is still beta, and even when released in full in the Spring, =
> Apple
> won't support windows. Everything is an additional install or hack. =
> Want
> right click to work? It=92s a hack.=20
>
> As for OS10 on a Windows machine? Will never happen. Why? Because =
> there's
> linux and lindows. (not misspelled). Meaning, there are enough =
> alternatives
> to Microsoft (firefox, thunderbird, lindows, etc) that it satisfies =
> those
> who don't worship at the altar of Bill. More importantly, WHY would =
> someone
> buy a PC to run Mac OS when they could just buy an imac?
>
> As for price, it depends on what sort of system you need. At my end, =
> I'm
> paying big bucks regardless of whether I go PC or Mac. BUT, if you don't
> need much except email and office, a mac is about $2000 more computer =
> than
> you need. =20
>
>
> Really, 90% of people using computers don't need much and will be fine
> whichever way they go. This argument over Macs/PCs etc is largely =
> semantics
> and annoying.=20
>
> A
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --=20
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.3/446 - Release Date: =
> 9/12/2006
> =20
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 16:17:16 -0400
> From: Brandon Greimann
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ??
>
> I've been curious about the possibility of Apple ditching the Mac hardware
> (which, with frequent new cost-competitive hardware releases seems far off
> in the future somewhere). I was part of the NeXT to NEXTSTEP to Mac OS/X
> transition back when. NeXT started as a hardware company, then ditched
> hardware in favor of cheaper PC's. Then sold to Apple and NEXTSTEP became
> what is now Mac OS/X. I think it would be the kiss of death for Apple to
> ditch making hardware and just support MacOS on Intel...which probably has
> already been ported...considering NEXTSTEP was ported to Intel back in
> 1992. An OS/hardware combination is so much more interesting and easier
> to
> support and allows for a much more elegant solution.
>
> If anything, I'd expect Apple to port OS/X to Intel (though only if
> there's
> a compelling business case...Steve's been down this road once before...)
> then ultimately ditch it in favor of consumer-end products like the iPod,
> iTV, and the supporting software platform and services. They're certainly
> making very evident moves towards a major presence in that market space.
> Same as any industry, how many vendors do you really need to provide the
> same basic functionality (cars, airplanes, trains, computer OS's, text
> editors..ie, Word, vi, emacs, Pages, etc...law of diminishing returns by
> providing unique but similar features).
>
> As an aside, I'm using a dual cinema display Mac Pro with Parallels
> running
> Windows XP (plus numerous Citrix and RDC connections to various other
> Windows servers...as well as ssh sessions to other UNIX boxes. All in all
> the best environment I've ever worked in so far in my career.
>
> Brandon
>
>
> On 9/13/06, kathy forer wrote:
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Lee Love
>>
>> It will make the OS affordable soon. If Mac goes belly up, hopefully
>> they will continue as an OS so it isn't as risky to own one.
>> -------------------------
>> It's curious why you would characterize the venerable yet thoroughly
>> revitalized Mac OS as "unaffordable." The latest release of OS X "Tiger"
>> (next to be "Leopard") costs about $130 for single user and $200 for
>> multi-computer 'family pack'. That's hundred fifty dollars less than the
>> Windows OS (XP Pro $280 at Amazon).
>>
>> The perception that Windows costs less is a result of its dependency on
>> OEM/System Builder manufacturer bundling it with cheaper (dare I call it
>> inferior?) hardware.
>>
>> An Apple computer will also thrive for many years after the usual
>> expendable PC cycle has consigned your latest three year old grey box to
>> the
>> garbage.
>>
>> As for Apple going under... I guess you've never seen an iPod, heard
>> about
>> iTunes nor read the financial pages.
>>
>> www.apple.com
>>
>> iTV: www.macworld.com/news/2006/09/12/itv/index.php.
>>
>> See top story (or search 'Apple') at www.businessweek.com
>> Why you even consider to purchase anything from a such a "moribund"
>> company?
>>
>> Hey, but I'm just drinking the koolaid.
>> Kathy Forer
>>
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 16:43:22 -0400
> From: Jacqueline Miller
> Subject: Re: the public's understanding of paperclay
>
> I agree that once the paper has burned out it is no longer paperclay. You
> could always say, however, that in the process you used xx-claybody with
> "cellulose inclusions." That might keep the paper mache interpretations at
> bay.
> Jackie Miller
>
> On 9/13/06, Craig Clark wrote:
>>
>> Judy, follow the link in the post below. It will explain a great many
>> things about paper clay and the history thereof. The grahamhay site will
>> also give you links to other sources of info on the subject. For a
>> definitive read consult and/or purchase "Paper Clay" by Rosette
>> Gault.....follow this link to one of many sources for the
>> book........http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/14102.html
>>
>> Hope this helps
>> Craig Dunn Clark
>> 619 East 11 1/2 St
>> Houston, Texas 77008
>> (713)861-2083
>> mudman@hal-pc.org
>>
>>
>> .Smith, Judy wrote:
>> > I am new to ceramics and only have a slight understanding of what paper
>> > clay is. Do you have a good recipe for making paper clay or do you
>> > know
>> > where I can get more information about this medium?
>> >
>> > Thanks,
>> > Judy Smith
>> >
>> > -----Original Message-----
>> > From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Craig
>> > Clark
>> > Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 6:37 PM
>> > To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>> > Subject: Re: the public's understanding of paperclay
>> >
>> > Meryl, you will run into the folks who automatically think paper
>> > mache whenever they read paper+clay. A short description of what paper
>> > clay is would help to inform those who would like to know. I like to
>> > call it "magic clay" because of all the stuff that you can get away
>> > when
>> > working with it.
>> > It really isn't all that new though. It has been around in
>> > different
>> > forms for a very long time. As far as the comtemporary widespread
>> > application and use of paper clay goes, much of the credit belongs to
>> > Rossette Gault. She is the one who did pretty extensive research back
>> > in
>> > the early 1990's. For a brief history from a 2004 symposium on the
>> > subject just follow the
>> > link....http://www.grahamhay.com.au/hay2006update.html
>> > Hope this helps
>> > Craig Dunn CLark
>> > 619 East 11 1/2 St
>> > Houston, Texas 77008
>> > (713)861-2083
>> > mudman@hal-pc.org
>> >
>> > .curtis adkins wrote:
>> >
>> >> Hi,
>> >> Are you making it or buying it premade...maybe just tell them the
>> >>
>> > process ...ie ^5 or ^10 stoneware or porcelain some folks just don't
>> > need to no anymore than what it isa for and how much it costs!
>> >
>> >> Curtis "Monk" Adkins
>> >> Miami, OK
>> >> Meryl Ruth wrote: Hi, I went to an opening where
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>> >> I had pieces of my work on display yesterday. This was the first time
>> >>
>> > I was showing work I had created from paperclay. I have previously only
>> > worked in stoneware and porcelain. Anyway we overheard two women
>> > discussing one of my pieces made of paperclay. One woman said, "What is
>> > paperclay?" And the reply of the second woman was, "I think that means
>> > paper mache`."
>> >
>> >> The public is not educated regarding paperclay. Do I display
>> >>
>> > information about this relatively new medium along with my work or is
>> > there another name for paperclay that can be used so it is not
>> > misrepresented as paper mache`. I wouldn't want folks to think my
>> > teapots were created from paper mache`. Not too functional!
>> >
>> >> Regards,
>> >> Meryl Ruth, Porcelain Grace
>> >> http://www.merylruth.com
>> >>
>> >> ______________________________________________________________________
>> >> ________ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>> >>
>> >> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> >> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>> >>
>> >> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> >>
>> > melpots@pclink.com.
>> >
>> >> ______________________________________________________________________
>> >> ________ Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>> >>
>> >> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> >> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>> >>
>> >> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> >>
>> > melpots@pclink.com.
>> >
>> >>
>> >
>> > ________________________________________________________________________
>> > ______
>> > Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>> >
>> > You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> > settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>> >
>> > Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> > melpots@pclink.com.
>> >
>> >
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> > Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>> >
>> > You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> > settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>> >
>> > Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Jackie Miller
> JackieAMiller@gmail.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:00:35 -0400
> From: John Post
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ?? (OT not clay)
>
> A weird thing I just discovered about iTunes (many of you may already
> know this) is that the music you purchase there is compressed. I like
> to play a clean-up song in my art classes for my elementary students.
>
> Last year it was Working in a Coal Mine, the year before it was Car
> Wash. This year I wanted to use James Brown's Get up Offa That Thing.
> I downloaded it from ITunes, but I just couldn't blast it loud enough
> from my CD player in the art room to get it to have that funky bass
> groove. So I went and purchased a CD of James Brown's Greatest Hits at
> the store and it blasted out of my CD player in the art room.
>
> I came home and imported the new CD into ITunes. I then burned a disc
> from ITunes of the purchased version. The ITunes software compressed
> the CD I bought when it wrote it to a new CD. ITunes turned the strong
> recording into a compressed version.
>
> Then I went onto a windows machine and ripped the song off of it and
> then burned it onto a cd on that machine and I got an exact copy of the
> original.
>
> So if you have followed this so far, the ITunes versions are both
> compressed and sound wimpy, the ones I bought off the shelf and then
> ripped on a windows machine sound great.
>
> John Post
> Sterling Heights....
>
> Who has mac, pc and Linux machines at home and likes each of them to a
> varying degree, but for all different reasons.....
>
>>
>> I just heard that iTunes is now available in Japan. This is
>> great. I've tried to sign up with ItUNES and sony's music services
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:22:39 -0400
> From: Eleanora Eden
> Subject: The Last Brickmaker
>
> Hi all,
>
> There was a TV movie on the other night called The Last Brickmaker
> starring
> an elderly and still compelling Sidney Poitier as the maker of all
> the brick in a
> small town near Springfield, MO.
>
> The process of making bricks in the old-fashioned way was depicted using a
> donkey to turn the clay mixer. Way cool was the process of building and
> firing
> the wood-fired kiln that was composed of all the brick that had to be
> fired with
> a mortar layer on the outside.
>
> Adjustments had to be made on the damper on the roof of the kiln
> during the firing
> and he had these wooden sandals to put on over his shoes to walk on the
> roof.
> Whoa!
>
> Anybody see this and have any opinions about how accurate it was?
> I really enjoyed it.
>
> Eleanora
> --
> Bellows Falls Vermont
> www.eleanoraeden.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 16:48:05 -0500
> From: mel jacobson
> Subject: paper clay and bricks
>
> if you compare the over/all strength of a soft brick ifb ,
> and a hard brick....well, that is paper clay in metaphor.
>
> if you add materials while making a brick that burns away...
> ifb...sawdust i believe....you have a very nice brick for
> insulation, but a very whimpy brick for strength.
>
> same for paper clay.
> at least loaded paper clay.
>
> i have used paper clay for a repair job...but not for
> pots.
> would never sell one for every day functional use.
>
> nice for decorative pots or sculpture.
>
> it is an easy metaphor to understand.
>
> some new york/ smarty pants artist could
> do a play about this idea.
>
> you know, stack ten bricks in the middle of the
> floor. five ifb, five hard brick.
> it could represent power and weakness.
> and, have connotations of alternative energy.
> wow.
> mel
> computer metaphor:
> it is like the idea if you use photoshop 11.0...it has the
> potential for about 125,000 tasks.
> most that use it, can do 25. an experienced graphic artist
> will commonly use, at a stretch 200.
> the computer, the software is about 10, 000 times more powerful
> than the dork at the wheel. so, spend another 3 grand and get
> a more powerful one...and sit and wonder what it can do.
> just like clay. get more tools, a bigger kiln, a huge pug mill, and
> make four pots a week.
>
> it is like sitting behind the wheel of a new porsch, going 55mph on the
> freeway...making car noises with your mouth...zoooom, zoooom.
>
> make the tools work for you, then work.
>
>
>
>
>
> from: mel/minnetonka.mn.usa
> website: http://www.visi.com/~melpots/
>
> Clayart page link: http://www.visi.com/~melpots/clayart.html
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 21:31:24 +0000
> From: "dwichman@frontiernet.net"
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - separate corners, children.
>
> Amanda,
>
> You say-
> "Honestly, are you guys just the MOST contentious people ever? Reading =
> these
> conversations are aggravating reminders of middle school.=20
>
> Much like the army, my computers do more before 9am than yours do all =
> day. I
> run a design agency, and my three systems (a mac and 2 pcs) are top of =
> the
> line, major investments. I spend months investigating before I put =
> money
> into them, read reports, assess software, etc.=20
> "
>
> If you feel this way, why are you reading them instead of deleting
> them? I work in an MIS department which uses different OS for
> different systems, servers and purposes. I find it interesting to see
> what peoples opinions are as relates to their different directions and
> purposes. After being in IS for 15 years, I know enough to know I will
> never know it all and cannot keep up with it. I only see it from my
> angle and that's not going to work for everyone.... Also as someone
> else said - it very much depends on your interests, how much time you
> are willing tp spend and if you have a desire to learn a system even if
> you know it may not be the best suited to the purpose at hand.
>
> Opinions are one way of sharing information....
>
> Debi Wichman
> Cookeville, TN
> http://www.elementterra.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:34:45 -0400
> From: Lynn Goodman Porcelain Pottery
> Subject: Re: OT: Anyone using Earthlink's SpamBlocker?
>
> Carl,
> I had this problem as well, but not nearly to the extent you are
> describing. (Perhaps it has to do with my having a Mac.) I always check
> my junk folder before deleting it; I don't assume that the spam blocker
> will recognize everything that is or isn't junk. I've caught some
> clayart listings, but other listings as well. I'm sure this is the
> case with any screening service; nothing is infallible.
>
> Lynn
>
>
> On Sep 12, 2006, at 4:06 PM, Carl Finch wrote:
>
>> When Earthlink first introduced its "spamBlocker" I immediately began
>> using
>> it and was impressed with how well it worked. So when folks wrote to
>> Clayart with spam troubles, on more than one occasion I recommended
>> spamBlocker. I used its highest setting which held up "suspected"
>> spam on
>> Earthlink's server.
>>
>> But then, about two years into its existence, it began to hold up
>> Clayart
>> posts--not all of them, just 2 or 3 per day--even though all other
>> messages
>> came through okay (I had "allowed" the domain, LSV.CERAMICS.ORG, in
>> Earthlink's Webmail address book). This meant that I had to go to
>> Earthlink's web site often to sift through all the "suspected"
>> messages and
>> release those from Clayarters--certainly a pain.
>>
>> Needless to say, I stopped promoting Earthlink and spamBlocker here on
>> Clayart!
>>
>> Then gradually the problem got worse, until about 20% of the Clayart
>> messages were getting held as "suspect." I began contacting Earthlink
>> support (phone, online chat, email). If you've ever tried Earthlink's
>> tech
>> support you can just guess how much help that was! Eventually I
>> discovered
>> an obscure statement in their documentation that admitted to the
>> error: Rarely, it claimed, some "allowed" messages will be held up as
>> suspected spam. Rarely, indeed!
>>
>> This bug has been buggin' me for about two years now. But then
>> suddenly,
>> about three weeks ago, no more Clayart messages were held up--not a
>> one! The bug (knock on wood) seems to have been repaired.
>>
>> QUESTION: I'm just curious to know if any other users of spamBlocker
>> have
>> experienced this, or could there have been something peculiar to my
>> setup.
>>
>> --Carl
>> in Medford, Oregon
>>
>> _______________________________________________________________________
>> _______
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>>
> Lynn Goodman
> Fine Porcelain Pottery
> Cell 347-526-9805
> www.lynngoodmanporcelain.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 18:02:02 -0400
> From: LindaC
> Subject: The Last Brickmaker
>
> Dear Elenora, I saw the show a while back and thoroughly enjoyed it and
> felt that it was most likely accurate. Sidney Poitier is so wonderful and
> Denzel Washington has aspired to act in the same fashion using Poitier as
> his mentor. It was a good and gentle story and I wish there were more of
> them made without the usual language, sex, and violence that is added to
> fill the movie industries perceived notion that that is what the public
> wants....If anyone else out there gets a chance to see "the Last
> Brickmaker"
> do! It'll probably come out in video one of these days. Best,
> Linda/Ohio
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 15:08:24 -0700
> From: Dave Finkelnburg
> Subject: Re: Thixtropic clay--casting slip question
>
> Ivy,
> Yes, any clay can be made into a casting slip.
> Whether it's a good casting slip...well...depends!
> :-)
> Non-plastic materials in a clay body make it
> somewhat porous, which makes the body better for
> casting--water can get out of the body and into the
> absorbent mold.
> The deflocculant allows one to make a relatively
> fluid slip that contains a near-minimum amount of
> water. The less water in the slip the quicker the
> walls build and the faster the casting forms in the
> mold.
> A good casting slip may only contain 35% clay. A
> typical stoneware for throwing, in contrast, is 85%
> clay.
> Good potting!
> Dave Finkelnburg
>
> --- Ivy Glasgow wrote:
>> This brings two questions to mind. Can just any clay
>> be made thixotropic by
>> this approach, or are there some which don't respond
>> to treatment with a
>> deflocculant? And, could just any clay be made into
>> a casting slip?
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:48:19 -0400
> From: Peter Cunicelli
> Subject: Re: paper clay and bricks
>
> I can second that analogy with the paper clay. For the past 9 months I've
> been working a lot with porcelain paper clay. I have bumped bone dry
> greenware into my workbench or ware shelves more times than I can count.
> I have yet to do it hard enough to break a piece.
>
> Other benefits: And this is a big one - drying a piece overnight without
> covering it. I've done that with regular porcelain with disastorous
> results. I've also worked with pieces that were very dry and anything
> I've done worked nicely.
>
> Mel, why wouldn't you use paper clay for functional work? I'm curious.
>
> I've been using it for functional ware and haven't had any problems. I
> did make a set of nesting bowls using paper clay I made with too much
> paper, however. They warped like crazy. But, the liner and accent glazes
> are food safe, so I use the bowls myself.
>
> Peter
> (www.petercunicelli.com)
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 18:10:04 -0400
> From: Lynn Goodman Porcelain Pottery
> Subject: Re: Commercial Cone 6 glazes
>
> Shirley,
>
> It sounds like you are doing everything right. Here are some things to
> keep in mind:
>
> 1) No one ^6 glaze will fit all ^6 clay bodies. ^6 porcelain is
> notorious for crazing glazes. Although, I certainly would think that a
> clay manufacturer's own glazes should fit. I think your best bet is to
> try several brands of glazes to see what fits best, since the company
> you're dealing with can't help you. Buy small amounts and test, test,
> test.
> 2) Like anything else in clay work, glazing properly takes practice.
> Nobody is good at it right away.
> 3) Ask your teacher to show you how to mix up glaze and what you should
> be looking for. If your teacher won't help you, see if you can find
> another teacher or someone who has been working in clay for a while who
> will help you.
>
> Good luck! If you stick with it, the glazing should improve.
>
> Lynn
>
>
> On Sep 13, 2006, at 12:08 AM, Shirley Ostrander wrote:
>
>>
>> Having said all that - here's what happened. I mixed 2 glazes - the
>> clear
>> and the pattern blue. I used distilled water and 5 lbs of dry glaze.
>> I put
>> less than a gallon of water with the dry glaze, even though someone at
>> L&R
>> told me that a gallon would be fine and that a hydrometer wouldn't
>> really be
>> necessary. It was thinner than egg nog, heaver than milk - "light
>> cream"
>> and coated my fingers. I dipped and the coating was similar to what I
>> get
>> on the earthenware that been dipping in the clear glaze (the
>> consistency was
>> similar too) The clay bodies that I used were L&R ^6 porcelain and ^6
>> stoneware. I thought, hey that should be a good match, right? I
>> called
>> them today because the "pattern blue" that I used turned out BLACK -
>> on both
>> the porcelain and the stoneware - turns out that someone forgot to put
>> the
>> rutile in a batch that went out (go figure, I'd get 5 of the 25 or so
>> pounds
>> that slipped by). The clear - well, it crazed - BADLY and is still
>> crazing.
>> (it might have settled by now) turns out that "oh yeah, the clear does
>> that".. Now, L&R is sending me replacement pattern blue - but DAMN -
>> what's
>> with the clear crazing - don't you think they should mention that when
>> they
>> sell it - or in the description somewhere?
>
>
> Lynn Goodman
> Fine Porcelain Pottery
> Cell 347-526-9805
> www.lynngoodmanporcelain.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:15:37 -0500
> From: Snail Scott
> Subject: Re: glazing/clay frustration
>
> On Sep 12, 2006, at 3:24 PM, Nancy Braches wrote:
>
>> The other day my supplier suggested I "hold" the kiln at the end for
>> 30 minutes...I have a manual kiln sitter so I have to wait for the
>> kiln to go off , then I turn it back on Medium for 30 minutes to hold
>> the temp...
>>
>
> Why let it turn off? Use a witness cone to determine
> the proper temperature, and use a higher cone in
> the sitter as a failsafe. Turning to 'medium' tends to
> allow more cooling than is best for a soak (I use that
> method to do give a slower cooling for my matte
> glazes), but try turning just the middle to 'medium' -
> for a mid-range stoneware firing, that often seems
> sufficient to stall it out without actually allowing the
> temperature to drop much. It can be a little uneven,
> but not as much as you might think. Turning all the
> switches to 'medium' for a short time, then back to
> 'high' and alternating for a while, will give a better
> soak, but be more labor-intensive.
>
>
> -Snail
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 18:28:37 -0400
> From: Brandon Greimann
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - which one for you ?? (OT not clay)
>
> Hi John,
>
> Interesting...is that with all compression schemes being equal...or did
> you
> rip/compress using more lossless/higher quality compression on the PC? I
> haven't paid much attention, but I always figured Apple tuned their iTunes
> music downloads for a reasonable balance between sound quality (for home
> stereo's and such) and portability (e.g. maximum use of an iPod).
>
> Kind of like the old days of vinyl versus CD. Analog still offers more
> data, just an inconvenient form factor for in-car use (unless you're
> Elvis...didn't he have a turntable in his car?).
>
> b
>
>
> On 9/13/06, John Post wrote:
>>
>> A weird thing I just discovered about iTunes (many of you may already
>> know this) is that the music you purchase there is compressed. I like
>> to play a clean-up song in my art classes for my elementary students.
>>
>> Last year it was Working in a Coal Mine, the year before it was Car
>> Wash. This year I wanted to use James Brown's Get up Offa That Thing.
>> I downloaded it from ITunes, but I just couldn't blast it loud enough
>> from my CD player in the art room to get it to have that funky bass
>> groove. So I went and purchased a CD of James Brown's Greatest Hits at
>> the store and it blasted out of my CD player in the art room.
>>
>> I came home and imported the new CD into ITunes. I then burned a disc
>> from ITunes of the purchased version. The ITunes software compressed
>> the CD I bought when it wrote it to a new CD. ITunes turned the strong
>> recording into a compressed version.
>>
>> Then I went onto a windows machine and ripped the song off of it and
>> then burned it onto a cd on that machine and I got an exact copy of the
>> original.
>>
>> So if you have followed this so far, the ITunes versions are both
>> compressed and sound wimpy, the ones I bought off the shelf and then
>> ripped on a windows machine sound great.
>>
>> John Post
>> Sterling Heights....
>>
>> Who has mac, pc and Linux machines at home and likes each of them to a
>> varying degree, but for all different reasons.....
>>
>> >
>> > I just heard that iTunes is now available in Japan. This is
>> > great. I've tried to sign up with ItUNES and sony's music services
>>
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 18:25:41 -0400
> From: Brandon Greimann
> Subject: Re: Windows, Linux, Mac - separate corners, children.
>
> Hi Amanda,
>
> What's the right-click hack? I The "Option mouse-click" thing? I use
> Microsoft USB two-button mice on my Mac's and now the Apple SuperMouse
> (with
> those side button thingies turned off...I kept clicking them) on my Mac
> Pro. And, conversely I use Apple keyboards on my PC's, but only since my
> beloved circa 1992 HP PA/RISC workstation keyboard died a few months ago.
> Anyhow, I'm diggin the right-click on the Mac and in
> Parallels|Citrix|RDC...it's all working good so far...but I'm always open
> for new hacks and ways to make things better.
>
> I can't agree more about what is essentially MIPS per user. 99% of the
> population has access to way more computer than they really need. I know
> I
> have far more than I can keep up with.
>
> Now, another question...since this computer thing got me to chatting on
> Clay
> Art (hi everyone). I'm trying to get back in the groove making pots this
> fall. We're going to visit Willi Singleton tomorrow at his studio so
> hopefully that's a good start. For those career computer geeks out there,
> what got you into clay and how do you manage to achieve both in your
> lives?
> -- finding it a struggle right now to do work and clay concurrently. :)
> Or
> throw me towards the archives if this has been hashed to death already.
>
> Cheers!
>
> b
>
>
> On 9/13/06, Amanda Blum - Howling Zoe Productions
> wrote:
>>
>> Honestly, are you guys just the MOST contentious people ever? Reading
>> these
>> conversations are aggravating reminders of middle school.
>>
>> Much like the army, my computers do more before 9am than yours do all
>> day.
>> I
>> run a design agency, and my three systems (a mac and 2 pcs) are top of
>> the
>> line, major investments. I spend months investigating before I put money
>> into them, read reports, assess software, etc.
>>
>> Macs are Macs and PCs are PCs. They are apples and oranges, they are
>> meant
>> for different people, and simply put, neither is "better" and neither are
>> going anywhere.
>>
>> Macs have lots of benefits including the invulnerability to viruses.
>> Point
>> to consider: will you be trading items with PC users often? While your
>> system won't go down you will more easily pass on viruses to your friends
>> since your system won't catch them. With competent virus protection,
>> viruses
>> are not the dark evil people make them out to be.
>>
>> Macs don't have as much access to free shareware, you have a harder time
>> finding peripherals, and frankly, getting macs fixed is a lot harder.
>> Your
>> options are Apple store (where people have actually DIED waiting for
>> help)
>> or contracting privately, and there are far fewer mac techs than pc
>> techs,
>> and their prices are higher. That said, most mac techs are better trained
>> and accredited.
>>
>> While SOME PC's are made of inferior parts (Dell), some are made of good
>> parts, and since Macs are now made with Intel parts, frankly, they're
>> made
>> of the SAME parts.
>>
>> Arguing over which OS is better is just stupid. They're different, that's
>> all. Personally, I actually prefer Windows. Some prefer OS10. Nuff said.
>>
>> Whomever said software should be a consideration was smart, but even that
>> is
>> iffy. Reports show that CS2 actually runs better on Windows than OS10,
>> which
>> is shocking since Macs have always been the darlings of designers.
>>
>> While Windows can now work via boot camp or parallels, its not solid.
>> First,
>> boot camp is still beta, and even when released in full in the Spring,
>> Apple
>> won't support windows. Everything is an additional install or hack. Want
>> right click to work? It's a hack.
>>
>> As for OS10 on a Windows machine? Will never happen. Why? Because there's
>> linux and lindows. (not misspelled). Meaning, there are enough
>> alternatives
>> to Microsoft (firefox, thunderbird, lindows, etc) that it satisfies those
>> who don't worship at the altar of Bill. More importantly, WHY would
>> someone
>> buy a PC to run Mac OS when they could just buy an imac?
>>
>> As for price, it depends on what sort of system you need. At my end, I'm
>> paying big bucks regardless of whether I go PC or Mac. BUT, if you don't
>> need much except email and office, a mac is about $2000 more computer
>> than
>> you need.
>>
>>
>> Really, 90% of people using computers don't need much and will be fine
>> whichever way they go. This argument over Macs/PCs etc is largely
>> semantics
>> and annoying.
>>
>> A
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> No virus found in this outgoing message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.3/446 - Release Date: 9/12/2006
>>
>>
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 16:01:51 -0700
> From: curtis adkins
> Subject: Re: Finding Kansas/Missouri Potters
>
> Hi Helen,
> Midwest Clay Artists, Its a guild in the MO, KS, AR, and OK area. I
> belong as of Aug. this year.
>
> Curtis Adkins
> Miami, OK
>
> Helen Bates wrote: On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 14:06:18
> GMT, C. A. Sanger wrote:
>
>>Hi! Could anyone tell me how to query the list to get studio addresses?
>>I
> am interested in finding other potters living and working in Kansas and
> Missouri. Thanks! C. A. Sanger
>>
>>C. A. Sanger Sparfish Studio Herington, KS
>
> C.A.,
>
> This is the link to the search page for Clayart:
> http://lsv.ceramics.org/scripts/wa.exe?S1=CLAYART&D=1&F=P&O=D
> Do some reading once you're there then try a search in the "For" section,
> such as the word strings: "Missouri or MO" without the quotation marks.
> (I
> used the "or" to include both forms for Missouri.)
>
> Also, use Google. Put a search like "Clayart Missouri" without the
> quotation marks. I found the url below with names of Missouri potters in
> that way:
>
> http://www.members.cox.net/midwestclay/public_html/index.html
> (Try an online telephone book, or use google to search for and of the
> individuals you see on the pages there.)
>
> And so on...
>
> Helen
> Belleville, ON
> Clayarters' websites page: http://amsterlaw.com/clayart/
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 19:52:59 -0400
> From: Mayssan Shora Farra
> Subject: Re: paper clay and bricks
>
> On Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:48:19 -0400, Peter Cunicelli wrote:
>
>>I can second that analogy with the paper clay. For the past 9 months I've
>>been working a lot with porcelain paper clay. I have bumped bone dry
>>greenware into my workbench or ware shelves more times than I can count.
>>I have yet to do it hard enough to break a piece.
>>
>>Other benefits: And this is a big one - drying a piece overnight without
>>covering it. I've done that with regular porcelain with disastorous
>>results. I've also worked with pieces that were very dry and anything
>>I've done worked nicely.
>>
>>Mel, why wouldn't you use paper clay for functional work? I'm curious.
>
>
> Hello Peter:
>
> I think Mel was talking about the lack of strength in paper clay.
>
> True, it is stronger in the green and dry stage, but once you fire all the
> paper out of it, the paper clay becomes more porous than regular clay and
> thus more susseptible to beaking, at least in my experience. Although I
> mostly do sculptural work but what I make is so fragile anyway and using
> paper clay was a disaster for me.
>
> Mayssan, in rainy Charleston WV USA
>
> http://www.clayvillepottery.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 20:25:32 -0400
> From: Barbara Lewis
> Subject: Re: paper clay and bricks
>
> Mel: Like Peter, I also know of at least one other person that uses
> papeclay for functional work . . . Elizabeth Kendall. I've had great
> success working with paperclay to produce THIN porcelain clay slabs that I
> use for canvases or for relief work. Barbara
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Peter Cunicelli"
> To:
> Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 5:48 PM
> Subject: Re: paper clay and bricks
>
>
>>I can second that analogy with the paper clay. For the past 9 months I've
>> been working a lot with porcelain paper clay. I have bumped bone dry
>> greenware into my workbench or ware shelves more times than I can count.
>> I have yet to do it hard enough to break a piece.
>>
>> Other benefits: And this is a big one - drying a piece overnight without
>> covering it. I've done that with regular porcelain with disastorous
>> results. I've also worked with pieces that were very dry and anything
>> I've done worked nicely.
>>
>> Mel, why wouldn't you use paper clay for functional work? I'm curious.
>>
>> I've been using it for functional ware and haven't had any problems. I
>> did make a set of nesting bowls using paper clay I made with too much
>> paper, however. They warped like crazy. But, the liner and accent
>> glazes
>> are food safe, so I use the bowls myself.
>>
>> Peter
>> (www.petercunicelli.com)
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:27:41 -0700
> From: Lee Love
> Subject: Music in the Studio: iTunes Sony Sonic Stage was : Windows,
> Linux,
> Mac - which one for you ?? (OT not clay)
>
> On 9/13/06, Brandon Greimann
>>
>>
>> Kind of like the old days of vinyl versus CD. Analog still offers more
>> data, just an inconvenient form factor for in-car use (unless you're
>> Elvis...didn't he have a turntable in his car?).
>>
>
> My great annoyance with propriatary software is that my hard drive
> would probably have twice a much space if I didn't need Sonic to access
> the
> Sony music service and iTunes to get to Apple's. I usually end up
> deleting the extra one, until I forget how annoying it is so I download it
> again, only to remove it from the HD when I remember! I keep Sonic on,
> because my portable music is on Sony MD.
>
> A universal music download system makes better sense.
>
> --
>
> Lee in Mashiko, Japan
> http://potters.blogspot.com/
> "Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 20:30:04 -0400
> From: Scott Hunnicutt
> Subject: oxidation and wood ash?
>
> hey all,
>
> couple of questions for y'all.
> Can you put wood ash/make a wood ash glaze that you can fire in oxidation?
>
> question two: can you put flashing slip on a piece of ware and fire it in
> oxidation?
>
> thanks, for answers in advance.
>
> Scott Hunnicutt
> begginer potter
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 20:19:18 -0500
> From: mel jacobson
> Subject: paper clay part two
>
> ok, just for instance.
>
> compare:
>
> a ron roy, well made, fired perfectly porcelain plate/cone 11.
> now, that is dense, hard, can be used for three thousand years.
> paper clay plate:
> and remember, i said...loaded paper clay.
>
> it would be full of millions of holes. swiss cheese times 30.
> it would last i am sure a few years of wear and tear.
>
> it just makes perfect sense. dense, fired `perfectly` porcelain will last
> forever.
>
> paper clay a few years.
>
> i would never make a set of dishes from paper clay.
> if you have a need to use paper clay because of very complex
> structure...of course, use paper clay. why would anyone make
> functional work from it? can you imagine a casserole from paper clay?
> the liability is bad enough with solid clay.
> mel
>
> from: mel/minnetonka.mn.usa
> website: http://www.visi.com/~melpots/
>
> Clayart page link: http://www.visi.com/~melpots/clayart.html
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 18:51:36 -0700
> From: Scott Harrison
> Subject: Five Potters Book
>
> One of my night students was looking for a book which featured five
> potters with perhaps Stephen Jepson? She was interested in the glaze
> recipes. Anybody remember this?
>
>
>
> Scott Harrison
> South Fork High School
> Humboldt Redwoods
> Upstate CA
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 21:48:50 -0400
> From: Scott Hunnicutt
> Subject: 240v outlet cost?
>
> hey all,
> I have a question. I live in charlotte, nc and I have been looking at
> small 240v kilns. Does anyone know how much a getting a 240 outlet
> installed costs? the circuit breaker is in the garage too.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 14 Sep 2006 11:14:45 +0900
> From: Lee Love
> Subject: Re: oxidation and wood ash?
>
> On 9/14/06, Scott Hunnicutt wrote:
>>
>> hey all,
>>
>> couple of questions for y'all.
>> Can you put wood ash/make a wood ash glaze that you can fire in
>> oxidation?
>
>
> Yes. I was experimenting with ash glazes over Alberta slip glazes at
> cone
> 6 oxidation before I moved to Japan. There is an old CM article on the
> subject. The slip glazes under the ash glaze percolate and break the
> surface of the ash glazes over it.
>
> question two: can you put flashing slip on a piece of ware and fire it in
>> oxidation?
>>
>
> In salt, soda or wood fire oxidation flashing slips work well. You
> get brighter colors in oxidation. See my unglazed woodfired work:
>
> http://potters.blogspot.com/
>
> But you need the vapor atmosphere to cause flashing.
>
> One thing they do here in electric is place pots on top of rice
> husk ash and sea shells. These make flashing on underside of the
> work. The other way is to sagger fire, but the electric elements here
> are
> thicker and are not damaged by the resultant vapor.
>
> --
>
> Lee in Mashiko, Japan
> http://potters.blogspot.com/
> "Let the beauty we love be what we do." - Rumi
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 19:10:00 -0700
> From: pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET
> Subject: Re: paper clay part two - just-a-thought...
>
> Hi Mel, all,
>
>
> How about 'Paper Clay' then for those gravity-fed
> Water Filter elements that fellow was trying to
> perfect for Africa and so on...where he was
> impregnating them post-fire with Silver Iodide or
> Silver Nitrate or whatever it was...
>
> The right Paper Clay might be just the ticket then
> for those...
>
> They are not subjected to any strains or 'use'
> other than sitting in the top of a Jar or
> Carboy...far as I recall...
>
> Just-a-thought...
>
>
> Where is he at with those anyway, does anyone
> happen to know?
>
> Name escapes me at the moment...
>
>
> Phil
> l v
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "mel jacobson"
>
>
>> ok, just for instance.
>>
>> compare:
>>
>> a ron roy, well made, fired perfectly porcelain
> plate/cone 11.
>> now, that is dense, hard, can be used for three
> thousand years.
>> paper clay plate:
>> and remember, i said...loaded paper clay.
>>
>> it would be full of millions of holes. swiss
> cheese times 30.
>> it would last i am sure a few years of wear and
> tear.
>>
>> it just makes perfect sense. dense, fired
> `perfectly` porcelain will last
>> forever.
>>
>> paper clay a few years.
>>
>> i would never make a set of dishes from paper
> clay.
>> if you have a need to use paper clay because of
> very complex
>> structure...of course, use paper clay. why
> would anyone make
>> functional work from it? can you imagine a
> casserole from paper clay?
>> the liability is bad enough with solid clay.
>> mel
>>
>> from: mel/minnetonka.mn.usa
>> website: http://www.visi.com/~melpots/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2006 19:22:20 -0700
> From: Stephani Stephenson
> Subject: Architectural Ceramics, tilemaking workshops: S. California
>
> I still have spaces available in my upcoming Architectural Ceramics
> Workshop.
>
> the group is small in number , but will be gung ho , and a small
> group just means you get more, more, more individual attention :)
> The workshop starts next week:
> Sept 21-25 (Thursday through Monday , 5 days)
>
> info at
> http://www.revivaltileworks.com/revivalworkshops.html
>
> info on lodging , location etc. at
> http://www.revivaltileworks.com/revivalworkshopinfo.html
>
>
> There are 2 spaces left in the Tilemaking Workshop (October 12-16, 5
> days)
>
> both are intensive hands on courses, all skill levels welcome.
> location is Encinitas CA , 20 miles north of San Diego, on the coast.
>
>
> Stephani Stephenson
> steph@revivaltileworks.com
> http://www.revivaltileworks.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of CLAYART Digest - 12 Sep 2006 to 13 Sep 2006 (#2006-246)
> **************************************************************
>