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how to hang these tiles?

updated tue 23 may 06

 

May Luk on sun 21 may 06


Hello all;

I would like to know how to make hanging tiles. These
are the sample quality filed under may_tiles.jpg:-

http://www.flickr.com/photos/clayart

I made these tiles by cutting out the silhouettes and
sculpting them by hand. The ones shown here can't be
hung because I didn't have the foresight. I also
didnít want to disturb them while they were drying
because I didnít want to warp the tiles and they are
kind of heavy. Now I need to know how to make the
hanging feature for the next ones.

These tiles will be for the exterior wall of a house
in San Francisco (CA). They will be facing the
backyard. I need them to be slightly earthquake proof.
I donít mind them broken but I donít want them hitting
anybody.

Many thanks in advance

May
LondON, UK

P.S. The photo email to Flickr/Clayart is very easy
and quick. Thanks to French Two Forever.

Hank Murrow on sun 21 may 06


Dear May;

I suggest that you try using Velcro to hang your tiles. I use =20
industrial strength Velcro glued to the tile with E-6800 silicone =20
adhesive(also known as 'ShooGoo'), and the mating surface of Velcro can =20=

be glued to the wall, or glued to a backing material(I use marine ply), =20=

which is fastened to the surface with drywall screws or anchors. The =20
system is earthquake-proof(the wineries in California use it now to =20
secure their valuable bottles in storage).

Cheers, Hank

On May 21, 2006, at 3:49 AM, May Luk wrote:

> Hello all;
>
> I would like to know how to make hanging tiles. These
> are the sample quality filed under may_tiles.jpg:-
>
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/clayart
>
> I made these tiles by cutting out the silhouettes and
> sculpting them by hand. The ones shown here can't be
> hung because I didn't have the foresight. I also
> didn=92t want to disturb them while they were drying
> because I didn=92t want to warp the tiles and they are
> kind of heavy. Now I need to know how to make the
> hanging feature for the next ones.
>
> These tiles will be for the exterior wall of a house
> in San Francisco (CA). They will be facing the
> backyard. I need them to be slightly earthquake proof.
> I don=92t mind them broken but I don=92t want them hitting
> anybody.
>
> Many thanks in advance
>
> May
> LondON, UK
>
> P.S. The photo email to Flickr/Clayart is very easy
> and quick. Thanks to French Two Forever.
>
> =
_______________________________________________________________________=20=

> _______
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at =20
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
>
www.murrow.biz/hank

Elizabeth Priddy on sun 21 may 06


There is a type of putty you find in automotive stores
that has been called radiator patch in the past...

Anyhow, it looks like a tootsie roll with a grey core.

You take a dime sized piece of it and knead it until
it is consitent and black, about two minutes. Anf
then you can apply it to virtually any surface and it
will stick, including ceramic or fired clay, even raku
fired clay.

It will stick things together, hangers on backs, and
with a little foresight before you mix it, like cement
in 15 minutes, you can shape a little hole through it
before you let it harden and stick your wire through
that and have a removeable wire.


E


Elizabeth Priddy

Beaufort, NC - USA
http://www.elizabethpriddy.com

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Snail Scott on mon 22 may 06


At 03:33 PM 5/21/2006 -0700, Elizabeth P wrote:
>There is a type of putty you find in automotive stores
>that has been called radiator patch in the past...



These types of putty epoxies have improved quite a
bit in recent years, snd are now much more widely
available. They even come in a (limited) range of
colors; the 'copper' one quite nice. These epoxies
can be found in the glue section of most hardware
stores, and some brands (like Magic-Sculp and
Gapoxio) are actually marketed as art materials.

I often use these for post-firing additions to my
ceramic work.

-Snail