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anyone single firing?

updated wed 5 apr 06

 

Paul B on tue 28 mar 06


I do all my bisque firings in an old electric kiln and the glaze firings in
a 70 cu.ft gas kiln, and have been thinking about single firing some of the
large bowls and platters i do because they take up so much space in the
bisque kiln that i can't produce enough of them.
I tried single firing a load of smaller platters a few years ago due to
time contraints with mixed success, and i am fairly certain that the pots
that cracked did so because the glaze i sprayed on them had too much water
in it - enough to leave small puddles as the glaze dried, since it could
not absorb as easily as with bisque ware. Some pots were noticeably cracked
by the time the glaze dried, where as others came out of the firing with
cracks (that may have formed before the firing).
Anyway, i have sprayed thousands of pots since then and now use glazes
which are very thick for spraying - sometimes almost as thick as a casting
slip, and the glaze bucket generally has only a very thin layer of water on
top even after the glaze settles for weeks.
So now i am thinking i can avoid the cracks i got the first time by
spraying a glaze with very little water in it.
From what i have read, a tight, porcelain-type clay body (such as b-mix) is
better than a more open-textured stoneware for single firing, but i am not
sure why.
Can anyone share their experience with single firing and comment as to
whether the ideas i mention here are correct or not?
Also, does anyone know if Ohata Kaki will work with single firing?
thanks,
Paul

Dave Finkelnburg on wed 29 mar 06


Paul,
You may want to review "Single Firing" by Fran
Tristram. It was originally published by A&C Black,
republished by Axner (Gentle Breeze Publishing). My
copy listed at less than $20.
Tristram's book is short, written from the
perspective of English slip-glazed pottery, so she
mainly talks about glazing at leatherhard. The glaze,
then, shrinks with the body. She discusses quite
elaborate decoration with the technique.
I have not found any difference between stoneware
and porcelain and B-mix bodies at c5 or c10 when
single firing. However, porcelain does tend to dry
bone dry on rims and handles and still be quite wet at
the foot or in thicker sections.
Like you, I have found that applying a high water
content glaze on bone-dry ware that is thin will cause
cracks. This can be overcome by applying multiple
coats and permitting drying in between coats. I am in
a very dry climate and it is extremely difficult,
lacking a full-fledged damp room, to get ware
uniformly leather hard, so if I'm going to single fire
I pretty much need to decorate bone dry ware.
Single-firing definitely tends to produce a
different fired glaze than twice-firing. Dr. William
Carty at Alfred proposed that greenware would have a
more reactive surface which would have a greater
effect on the fired glaze than a high-temperature
bisque would, in the case of glaze firing to the same
temperature. I am of the opposite opinion. Tests I
made of these hypotheses were not conclusive--applied
glaze thickness has a bigger impact and obscured the
results. However, I suspect one of us is right. :-)
I can see no reason Ohata Khaki should be more
problematic when single-fired than twice-fired.
Good luck with your firing!
Dave Finkelnburg

--- Paul B wrote:
> I...have been thinking about
> single firing some of the
> large bowls and platters i do because they take up
> so much space in the
> bisque kiln that i can't produce enough of them.
> I tried single firing a load of smaller platters a
> few years ago due to
> time contraints with mixed success, and i am fairly
> certain that the pots
> that cracked did so because the glaze i sprayed on
> them had too much water
> in it - enough to leave small puddles as the glaze
> dried, since it could
> not absorb as easily as with bisque ware. Some pots
> were noticeably cracked
> by the time the glaze dried, where as others came
> out of the firing with
> cracks (that may have formed before the firing).
> Anyway, i have sprayed thousands of pots since then
> and now use glazes
> which are very thick for spraying - sometimes almost
> as thick as a casting
> slip, and the glaze bucket generally has only a very
> thin layer of water on
> top even after the glaze settles for weeks.
> So now i am thinking i can avoid the cracks i got
> the first time by
> spraying a glaze with very little water in it.
> From what i have read, a tight, porcelain-type clay
> body (such as b-mix) is
> better than a more open-textured stoneware for
> single firing, but i am not
> sure why.
> Can anyone share their experience with single firing
> and comment as to
> whether the ideas i mention here are correct or not?
> Also, does anyone know if Ohata Kaki will work with
> single firing?


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Michael Wendt on wed 29 mar 06


Paul,
I did single firing for about the first six years I
made
pottery. You are correct about the cracking being
an issue if the glaze is applied either too wet or too
heavily.
I resorted to dipping the outside one day and pouring
the inside the next day.
Recently, I did a saturated iron red series green
glazed
over the Helmer porcelain. I gave the sample to
Jonathan
and Annie at NCECA so if they read this, they might
comment on how it worked.
As you might guess, firing the green glazed wares
required
a bisque ware schedule up to bisque temperatures to
avoid the pitfalls of poor body oxidation you might
get if you reduce early in a glaze firing.
Once you master it, it works well.
I quit because I started hiring people to help me and
the
loss rate with green glazed wares was too high with
new or inexperienced workers.
Regards,
Michael Wendt
Wendt Pottery
2729 Clearwater Ave
Lewiston, Idaho 83501
USA
wendtpot@lewiston.com
www.wendtpottery.com
Paul wrote:
Can anyone share their experience with single firing
and comment as to
whether the ideas i mention here are correct or not?
Also, does anyone know if Ohata Kaki will work with
single firing?
thanks,
Paul

Stephani Stephenson on wed 29 mar 06


I single fired for quite awhile
tile, also some basins, etc.
not stoneware temp, but cone 04- cone 1
clay body was somewhat open though not excessively so.
applied glaze to bone dry pieces,
glaze was fairly thick, thicker than the typical
spraying consistency
even thicker than typical dipping
I applied with brush, thinned it somewhat for pouring
or spraying
Ware was also thick, 5/8 -3/4 inch thick
if inside and outside of walls were glazed
you either had to do both in immediate sequence
or allow one surface to completely dry
before glazing the other
and once a piece is glazed ,
it needs to sit for about 15 minutes.
so either put it on shelf immediately after glazing or let it sit
for 15 or so minutes until it is thoroughly dry again

the water takes a few minute to work its way into the clay, and for
that timespan,
the piece is vulnerable
of course , the exact amount of time depends on the clay, the thickness
of the piece
the water in the glaze.


Stephani Stephenson
steph@revivaltileworks.com
http://www.revivaltileworks.com

Tony Ferguson on wed 29 mar 06


Paul,

If you glaze porcelain: dip quick--if you over saturate it will split apart
If you glaze a tight stoneware: treat it as porcelain
If you glaze an open groggy stoneware: glaze bone dry and be quick about it.

Spraying will reduce your chances of all problems as long as you don't oversaturate the work.

Some pieces you will want to glaze the inside first, wait 10 minutes and then glaze the outside. Vice a versa depending on the work.

If you glaze the side and plan to leave the outside claybody or slipped area exposed, you still need to wet it with water to introduce moisture.

Always do some tests (glaze that one this way and another of the same form a different way, etc) and come back an hour. Your work will tell you what way to glaze them.

Tony Ferguson




Paul B wrote:
I do all my bisque firings in an old electric kiln and the glaze firings in
a 70 cu.ft gas kiln, and have been thinking about single firing some of the
large bowls and platters i do because they take up so much space in the
bisque kiln that i can't produce enough of them.
I tried single firing a load of smaller platters a few years ago due to
time contraints with mixed success, and i am fairly certain that the pots
that cracked did so because the glaze i sprayed on them had too much water
in it - enough to leave small puddles as the glaze dried, since it could
not absorb as easily as with bisque ware. Some pots were noticeably cracked
by the time the glaze dried, where as others came out of the firing with
cracks (that may have formed before the firing).
Anyway, i have sprayed thousands of pots since then and now use glazes
which are very thick for spraying - sometimes almost as thick as a casting
slip, and the glaze bucket generally has only a very thin layer of water on
top even after the glaze settles for weeks.
So now i am thinking i can avoid the cracks i got the first time by
spraying a glaze with very little water in it.
From what i have read, a tight, porcelain-type clay body (such as b-mix) is
better than a more open-textured stoneware for single firing, but i am not
sure why.
Can anyone share their experience with single firing and comment as to
whether the ideas i mention here are correct or not?
Also, does anyone know if Ohata Kaki will work with single firing?
thanks,
Paul

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Tony Ferguson
...where the sky meets the lake...
Duluth, Minnesota
Artist, Educator, Web Meister
fergyart@yahoo.com
fergy@cpinternet.com
(218) 727-6339
http://www.aquariusartgallery.com
http://www.tonyferguson.net

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Richard Aerni on wed 29 mar 06


Paul,
I have single-fired for the last 26 years. Little pots, big pots,
architectural tiles and murals and fountains, porcelain, stoneware, toothy
open bodies, tight bodies such as B-Mix. They have all worked for me. The
basis for my spray glazes is 1 cup of water for 200 grams of dry mix,
although I do thicken certain glazes that like to go on thick, such as oribe
greens, rutile blues, tin/rutile whites, spodumene mattes, etc. I don't use
the ubiquitous HVLP spray gun, but use a Gilmour Handy-Sandblaster, with a
compressor and the air pressure usually at about 50 psi.
You do have to control the thickness of your pot walls and bottoms so that
they are of a more uniform thickness than you may have been used to working
with your bisqued pots. I also spray the interiors of my pots, rather than
pouring them. If you do choose to pour them, you may wish to sponge the
exterior of the pot before pouring the interior glaze to equalize the
expansion from the moisture.
But rather than listen to me from a distance, go check out master potter and
single firer Michael Frasca down in Harrodsburg. You're in Falmouth, right,
which is right up the pike. He used to be in Cincy and in the northern
Kentucky area, so you may even know him. He knows everything I know about
single firing, and perhaps a bit more.
Good luck with all this, and email or call me if you have some more
questions. Oh, and Ohata works beautifully single fired. What I do to
convert typical bisqueware glazes to singlefire is to make the total
bentonite content 4 1/2%. This will work for just about any glaze, but I
don't mess with shinos or copper reds in single fire, as the firing specs
aren't compatible with successful single firing (at least in my experience).
Best,
Richard Aerni
Rochester, NY

lyla_kaplan on thu 30 mar 06


i too am venturing into singlefiring...steven hill has an in depth
article in a recent ceramics monthly, he does a lot of spraying and
he, too, suggests leather hard. in my life schedule, and fluctuating
humidity, it is hard to stay on top of pots to glaze them at the right
leatherhard moment. i'd rather try to stick to bone dry...so far i
have tested with highwater's hestia and pheonix (stoneware), 3
different glazes applied bone dry, but to the interior only (rob's
green+bentonite, tom coleman's black, and gringhuis green + bento).
for next firing, will attempt bigger bowls and plate interiors, bone dry.
lyla

--- In clayart@yahoogroups.com, Dave Finkelnburg wrote:
>
> Paul,
> You may want to review "Single Firing" by Fran
> Tristram. It was originally published by A&C Black,
> republished by Axner (Gentle Breeze Publishing). My
> copy listed at less than $20.
> Tristram's book is short, written from the
> perspective of English slip-glazed pottery, so she
> mainly talks about glazing at leatherhard. The glaze,
> then, shrinks with the body. She discusses quite
> elaborate decoration with the technique.
> I have not found any difference between stoneware
> and porcelain and B-mix bodies at c5 or c10 when
> single firing. However, porcelain does tend to dry
> bone dry on rims and handles and still be quite wet at
> the foot or in thicker sections.
> Like you, I have found that applying a high water
> content glaze on bone-dry ware that is thin will cause
> cracks. This can be overcome by applying multiple
> coats and permitting drying in between coats. I am in
> a very dry climate and it is extremely difficult,
> lacking a full-fledged damp room, to get ware
> uniformly leather hard, so if I'm going to single fire
> I pretty much need to decorate bone dry ware.
> Single-firing definitely tends to produce a
> different fired glaze than twice-firing. Dr. William
> Carty at Alfred proposed that greenware would have a
> more reactive surface which would have a greater
> effect on the fired glaze than a high-temperature
> bisque would, in the case of glaze firing to the same
> temperature. I am of the opposite opinion. Tests I
> made of these hypotheses were not conclusive--applied
> glaze thickness has a bigger impact and obscured the
> results. However, I suspect one of us is right. :-)
> I can see no reason Ohata Khaki should be more
> problematic when single-fired than twice-fired.
> Good luck with your firing!
> Dave Finkelnburg
>
> --- Paul B wrote:
> > I...have been thinking about
> > single firing some of the
> > large bowls and platters i do because they take up
> > so much space in the
> > bisque kiln that i can't produce enough of them.
> > I tried single firing a load of smaller platters a
> > few years ago due to
> > time contraints with mixed success, and i am fairly
> > certain that the pots
> > that cracked did so because the glaze i sprayed on
> > them had too much water
> > in it - enough to leave small puddles as the glaze
> > dried, since it could
> > not absorb as easily as with bisque ware. Some pots
> > were noticeably cracked
> > by the time the glaze dried, where as others came
> > out of the firing with
> > cracks (that may have formed before the firing).
> > Anyway, i have sprayed thousands of pots since then
> > and now use glazes
> > which are very thick for spraying - sometimes almost
> > as thick as a casting
> > slip, and the glaze bucket generally has only a very
> > thin layer of water on
> > top even after the glaze settles for weeks.
> > So now i am thinking i can avoid the cracks i got
> > the first time by
> > spraying a glaze with very little water in it.
> > From what i have read, a tight, porcelain-type clay
> > body (such as b-mix) is
> > better than a more open-textured stoneware for
> > single firing, but i am not
> > sure why.
> > Can anyone share their experience with single firing
> > and comment as to
> > whether the ideas i mention here are correct or not?
> > Also, does anyone know if Ohata Kaki will work with
> > single firing?
>
>
> __________________________________________________
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> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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>
>
___________________________________________________________________________=
___
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>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
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>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@...
>

JOYCE LEE on fri 31 mar 06


ok
----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Aerni"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2006 7:17 PM
Subject: Re: Anyone single firing?


> Paul,
> I have single-fired for the last 26 years. Little pots, big pots,
> architectural tiles and murals and fountains, porcelain, stoneware, toothy
> open bodies, tight bodies such as B-Mix. They have all worked for me.
The
> basis for my spray glazes is 1 cup of water for 200 grams of dry mix,
> although I do thicken certain glazes that like to go on thick, such as
oribe
> greens, rutile blues, tin/rutile whites, spodumene mattes, etc. I don't
use
> the ubiquitous HVLP spray gun, but use a Gilmour Handy-Sandblaster, with a
> compressor and the air pressure usually at about 50 psi.
> You do have to control the thickness of your pot walls and bottoms so that
> they are of a more uniform thickness than you may have been used to
working
> with your bisqued pots. I also spray the interiors of my pots, rather
than
> pouring them. If you do choose to pour them, you may wish to sponge the
> exterior of the pot before pouring the interior glaze to equalize the
> expansion from the moisture.
> But rather than listen to me from a distance, go check out master potter
and
> single firer Michael Frasca down in Harrodsburg. You're in Falmouth,
right,
> which is right up the pike. He used to be in Cincy and in the northern
> Kentucky area, so you may even know him. He knows everything I know about
> single firing, and perhaps a bit more.
> Good luck with all this, and email or call me if you have some more
> questions. Oh, and Ohata works beautifully single fired. What I do to
> convert typical bisqueware glazes to singlefire is to make the total
> bentonite content 4 1/2%. This will work for just about any glaze, but I
> don't mess with shinos or copper reds in single fire, as the firing specs
> aren't compatible with successful single firing (at least in my
experience).
> Best,
> Richard Aerni
> Rochester, NY
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Russel Fouts on fri 31 mar 06


Tony,

>> If you glaze porcelain: dip quick--if you over saturate it will
split apart
If you glaze a tight stoneware: treat it as porcelain
if you glaze an open groggy stoneware: glaze bone dry and be quick about it.

Spraying will reduce your chances of all problems as long as you
don't oversaturate the work.
Some pieces you will want to glaze the inside first, wait 10 minutes
and then glaze the outside. Vice a versa depending on the work.

If you glaze the side and plan to leave the outside claybody or
slipped area exposed, you still need to wet it with water to
introduce moisture.
>>

Rules, rules, rules. ;-)

We did raw glazing back in school based on Dennis Parks book. We
glazed a slightly groggy stonware leather hard and dipped inside and
outside in one go. Nice way to work, very dynamic; finger swipes,
scrafitto through the glaze into the body, sprinkle ashes onto the
wet glaze. Real nice. Glazes were mostly clay and ash.

And this was in a classroom environment.

>> Always do some tests (glaze that one this way and another of the
same form a different way, etc) and come back an hour. Your work
will tell you what way to glaze them. <<

This is the best advice! Test, see what works for you.

Russel



Russel Fouts
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Brussels, Belgium
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Belinda Willis on fri 31 mar 06


All this talk about single firing makes me wonder=85.could someone who fires=

to ^6 ox do single firing to ^04? That would put glazed work in the
typical bisque firing used by many ^6er=92s.

Belinda Willis
www.greatpottery.com

lee love on fri 31 mar 06


--- In clayart@yahoogroups.com, Tony Ferguson wrote:
>
> Paul,
>
> If you glaze porcelain: dip quick--if you over saturate it will
split apart
> If you glaze a tight stoneware: treat it as porcelain
> If you glaze an open groggy stoneware: glaze bone dry and be
quick about it.
>

Tony, I have had a little different experience. I have found that
tight bodies do okay in green glazing but my open bodies, like my
shigaraki with feldspar, will crack and fall apart, even with a
little water after green. I always dip when I single fire. Maybe
that makes a difference? Spraying is probably more forgiving.


--
Lee In Mashiko, Japan
http://mashiko.org

Tony Ferguson on sat 1 apr 06


Belinda,

Yes, you can single fire to any temperature.

Tony Ferguson


Belinda Willis wrote:
All this talk about single firing makes me wonder….could someone who fires
to ^6 ox do single firing to ^04? That would put glazed work in the
typical bisque firing used by many ^6er’s.

Belinda Willis
www.greatpottery.com

______________________________________________________________________________
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
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Tony Ferguson
...where the sky meets the lake...
Duluth, Minnesota
Artist, Educator, Web Meister
fergyart@yahoo.com
fergy@cpinternet.com
(218) 727-6339
http://www.aquariusartgallery.com
http://www.tonyferguson.net

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Richard Aerni on sun 2 apr 06


Hi Tony,
Thanks! I may take you up on it sometime soon. I messed around with Shinos
in the early 1980's, got it all carbony, and curdled, and pretty cool, in my
estimation. But I did it on bisqueware.
The way I fire my kiln now, I don't do a body reduction, and don't try to
get it into reduction at all till I'm getting close to cone 4. I do a long
clean soak at about 1700 F to make sure all the nasties in the clay come out
and I don't end up with pitted ash glazes, which make up about 95% of my
work. So, if I haven't thought of all the angles on single-firing shinos,
I'd love to have you open my eyes.
So thanks again, and I will drop you a line in the future!
Best,
Richard

On Sun, 2 Apr 2006 14:16:29 -0700, Tony Ferguson wrote:

> All I did was mess around with shinos for 10 years. The Japanese, well,
much longer. Shino is in fact one of the best glaze types to single fire.
It all depends on the claybody and application, and as I said before, you
just got to try different techniques till you find the one that works for
you. It is not about rules, just multiple solutions to the
problem--figuring out what works for you. Richard, any time you want to
experiment with shino, please give me a call. I will help you how ever I can
to figure out how to apply the glaze so it works on your clay body. There
are all sorts of tricks and they are simple.
>
> Tony Ferguson
>
> > don't mess with shinos or copper reds in single fire, as the firing
>specs
>> aren't compatible with successful single firing (at least in my
>experience).
>> Best,
>> Richard Aerni
>> Rochester, NY
>
>
>
>
>
>JOYCE LEE wrote:
> ok
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Richard Aerni"
>To:
>Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2006 7:17 PM
>Subject: Re: Anyone single firing?
>
>
>> Paul,
>> I have single-fired for the last 26 years. Little pots, big pots,
>> architectural tiles and murals and fountains, porcelain, stoneware, toothy
>> open bodies, tight bodies such as B-Mix. They have all worked for me.
>The
>> basis for my spray glazes is 1 cup of water for 200 grams of dry mix,
>> although I do thicken certain glazes that like to go on thick, such as
>oribe
>> greens, rutile blues, tin/rutile whites, spodumene mattes, etc. I don't
>use
>> the ubiquitous HVLP spray gun, but use a Gilmour Handy-Sandblaster, with a
>> compressor and the air pressure usually at about 50 psi.
>> You do have to control the thickness of your pot walls and bottoms so that
>> they are of a more uniform thickness than you may have been used to
>working
>> with your bisqued pots. I also spray the interiors of my pots, rather
>than
>> pouring them. If you do choose to pour them, you may wish to sponge the
>> exterior of the pot before pouring the interior glaze to equalize the
>> expansion from the moisture.
>> But rather than listen to me from a distance, go check out master potter
>and
>> single firer Michael Frasca down in Harrodsburg. You're in Falmouth,
>right,
>> which is right up the pike. He used to be in Cincy and in the northern
>> Kentucky area, so you may even know him. He knows everything I know about
>> single firing, and perhaps a bit more.
>> Good luck with all this, and email or call me if you have some more
>> questions. Oh, and Ohata works beautifully single fired. What I do to
>> convert typical bisqueware glazes to singlefire is to make the total
>> bentonite content 4 1/2%. This will work for just about any glaze, but I
>> don't mess with shinos or copper reds in single fire, as the firing specs
>> aren't compatible with successful single firing (at least in my
>experience).
>> Best,
>> Richard Aerni
>> Rochester, NY
>>
>>
>____________________________________________________________________________
>__
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>melpots@pclink.com.
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>
>
>
>Tony Ferguson
>...where the sky meets the lake...
>Duluth, Minnesota
>Artist, Educator, Web Meister
>fergyart@yahoo.com
>fergy@cpinternet.com
>(218) 727-6339
>http://www.aquariusartgallery.com
>http://www.tonyferguson.net
>
>---------------------------------
>New Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Call regular phones from your PC and save big.
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.

Rogier Donker on sun 2 apr 06


Yep, been doing that for over 35 years....As long as the ware is good
and dry,no problems. Ever. Get a better glaze/clay "fit" too than
bisque/glaze firing.
Rogier
See us on the web at http://www.donkerstudio.org

Tony Ferguson on sun 2 apr 06


All I did was mess around with shinos for 10 years. The Japanese, well, much longer. Shino is in fact one of the best glaze types to single fire. It all depends on the claybody and application, and as I said before, you just got to try different techniques till you find the one that works for you. It is not about rules, just multiple solutions to the problem--figuring out what works for you. Richard, any time you want to experiment with shino, please give me a call. I will help you how ever I can to figure out how to apply the glaze so it works on your clay body. There are all sorts of tricks and they are simple.

Tony Ferguson

> don't mess with shinos or copper reds in single fire, as the firing
specs
> aren't compatible with successful single firing (at least in my
experience).
> Best,
> Richard Aerni
> Rochester, NY





JOYCE LEE wrote:
ok
----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Aerni"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2006 7:17 PM
Subject: Re: Anyone single firing?


> Paul,
> I have single-fired for the last 26 years. Little pots, big pots,
> architectural tiles and murals and fountains, porcelain, stoneware, toothy
> open bodies, tight bodies such as B-Mix. They have all worked for me.
The
> basis for my spray glazes is 1 cup of water for 200 grams of dry mix,
> although I do thicken certain glazes that like to go on thick, such as
oribe
> greens, rutile blues, tin/rutile whites, spodumene mattes, etc. I don't
use
> the ubiquitous HVLP spray gun, but use a Gilmour Handy-Sandblaster, with a
> compressor and the air pressure usually at about 50 psi.
> You do have to control the thickness of your pot walls and bottoms so that
> they are of a more uniform thickness than you may have been used to
working
> with your bisqued pots. I also spray the interiors of my pots, rather
than
> pouring them. If you do choose to pour them, you may wish to sponge the
> exterior of the pot before pouring the interior glaze to equalize the
> expansion from the moisture.
> But rather than listen to me from a distance, go check out master potter
and
> single firer Michael Frasca down in Harrodsburg. You're in Falmouth,
right,
> which is right up the pike. He used to be in Cincy and in the northern
> Kentucky area, so you may even know him. He knows everything I know about
> single firing, and perhaps a bit more.
> Good luck with all this, and email or call me if you have some more
> questions. Oh, and Ohata works beautifully single fired. What I do to
> convert typical bisqueware glazes to singlefire is to make the total
> bentonite content 4 1/2%. This will work for just about any glaze, but I
> don't mess with shinos or copper reds in single fire, as the firing specs
> aren't compatible with successful single firing (at least in my
experience).
> Best,
> Richard Aerni
> Rochester, NY
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
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>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

______________________________________________________________________________
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.



Tony Ferguson
...where the sky meets the lake...
Duluth, Minnesota
Artist, Educator, Web Meister
fergyart@yahoo.com
fergy@cpinternet.com
(218) 727-6339
http://www.aquariusartgallery.com
http://www.tonyferguson.net

---------------------------------
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Marta Matray on mon 3 apr 06


yes, indeed.
i am single and i am firing.
i know some other single potters
who are firing as well...
he-he.

sorry, i couldnt resist!!!
:)
marta
=====
marta matray
rochester,mn

http://www.angelfire.com/mn2/marta/
http://users.skynet.be/russel.fouts/Marta.htm
http://www.silverhawk.com/crafts/gloviczki/welcome.html

W J Seidl on tue 4 apr 06


But, my dear...
are you firing on all cylinders???
Sorry, couldn't resist that either.
ROFL
Wayne
ready to be fired, er, retired, er...

-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Marta Matray
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2006 2:27 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Re: Anyone single firing?

yes, indeed.
i am single and i am firing.
i know some other single potters
who are firing as well...
he-he.

sorry, i couldnt resist!!!
:)
marta
=====
marta matray
rochester,mn