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advancer shelves??

updated wed 20 jul 05

 

Hank Murrow on mon 18 jul 05


On Jul 18, 2005, at 2:05 PM, Gordon Ward wrote:

> Susan,
>
> I bought some of the first generation Norton Chrystar shelves many
> years ago (after back surgery) and I believe they are very similar to
> the now somewhat more affordable Advancers. A few years ago I mixed a
> glaze incorrectly (left out the clay) and the glaze ran down onto the
> shelves. After years of nary a drip, my heart dropped at the sight.
> I scrubbed much of it off with an old broken kiln shelf and the little
> remaining came off with a dremel tool. It wasn't nearly as bad as it
> looked and ultimately didn't hurt any of the shelves! I continue, in
> lieu of kiln wash, with a dusting of alumina powder (the granular
> kind) as Hank showed me many years ago. The pots can shrink without
> sticking as though on ball bearings.

Dear Gordon and Susan;

I used Crystar originally, but they were prone to failure after awhile.
The Advancers are a product MUCH more suitable for potters, and have
performed flawlessly for me. Spills are easy to pop off with a very
sharp and small chisel. They are so dense, they don't absorb glaze. As
Gordon says, I use alumina......perhaps 80 mesh, spreading it on the
setters with a carbide grooved block.

Do have to keep them dry......I use a light bulb in the bottom of the
cabinet I keep them in.

Cheers, Hank
www.murrow.biz/hank

Susan Giddings on mon 18 jul 05


I have questions about advancer shelves and how to use them::

1. How easily do glaze spills clean up? We sometimes have glazes really melt
off and leave a sizable "deposit" on the shelf. How will this sort of glaze
spill clean up - if at all ?

2/ What do you use to clean the shelves between firings?

I am writing on behalf of a teaching studio. We fire in a large Olympic
Torchbearer, ^10 gas. Any input will be greatly appreciated. And if there's
something better than advancers, feel free to expound.But We need to know
details as far as how to use them and what to expect.

TIA, Susan
-------------------------------------------------
Susan Giddings
Bloomfield, Connecticut; New England
North East Coast; USA

"There are painters who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but there are
others who, thanks to their art and intelligence, transform a yellow spot
into the sun." Pablo Picasso






----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

Gordon Ward on mon 18 jul 05


Susan,

I bought some of the first generation Norton Chrystar shelves many =20
years ago (after back surgery) and I believe they are very similar to =20=

the now somewhat more affordable Advancers. A few years ago I mixed a =20=

glaze incorrectly (left out the clay) and the glaze ran down onto the =20=

shelves. After years of nary a drip, my heart dropped at the sight. I =20=

scrubbed much of it off with an old broken kiln shelf and the little =20
remaining came off with a dremel tool. It wasn't nearly as bad as it =20=

looked and ultimately didn't hurt any of the shelves! I continue, in =20=

lieu of kiln wash, with a dusting of alumina powder (the granular kind) =20=

as Hank showed me many years ago. The pots can shrink without sticking =20=

as though on ball bearings.

Gordon


On Jul 18, 2005, at 12:30 PM, Susan Giddings wrote:

> I have questions about advancer shelves and how to use them::
>
> 1. How easily do glaze spills clean up? We sometimes have glazes =20
> really melt
> off and leave a sizable "deposit" on the shelf. How will this sort of =20=

> glaze
> spill clean up - if at all ?
>
> 2/ What do you use to clean the shelves between firings?
>
> I am writing on behalf of a teaching studio. We fire in a large =20
> Olympic
> Torchbearer, ^10 gas. Any input will be greatly appreciated. And if =20=

> there's
> something better than advancers, feel free to expound.But We need to =20=

> know
> details as far as how to use them and what to expect.
>
> TIA, Susan
> -------------------------------------------------
> Susan Giddings
> Bloomfield, Connecticut; New England
> North East Coast; USA
>
> "There are painters who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but =20
> there are
> others who, thanks to their art and intelligence, transform a yellow =20=

> spot
> into the sun." =97 Pablo Picasso
>
>
>
>
>
>
> =
-----------------------------------------------------------------------=20=

> -----
> ----
>
> =
_______________________________________________________________________=20=

> _______
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at =20
> melpots@pclink.com.
>

Rikki Gill on tue 19 jul 05


I would like to add that I mix alumina hydrate with the wax I paint on the
bottoms of my pots prior to glazing, and on the bottoms of my kiln posts,
and that also prevents sticking. [Personally, I don't like free alumina on
the shelves.] A spatula -like scraper lifts up any drips, or a silicone
carbide easily removes a bad patch.

Posts stick to advancers more than mullite or high alumina shelves, and
require more of a clean up. I tried k-wool paper under the posts, and
decided it's not worth the trouble, so now I wax posts as I place them in
the kiln. It helps a lot. I think advancers are more than worth the money.
I fire to cone 11, and there is no warpage.

Rikki Gill
www.rikkigillceramics.com


----- Original Message -----
From: "Hank Murrow"
Subject: Re: Advancer shelves??


> On Jul 18, 2005, at 2:05 PM, Gordon Ward wrote:
>
> > Susan,
> >
> >

Susan Giddings on tue 19 jul 05


Thanks Hank and Gordon for your answers.
Coupled with what I found in the Archives, I think this will help us make
the decision to spend the money.

S
-------------------------------------------------
Susan Giddings
Bloomfield, Connecticut; New England
North East Coast; USA

"There are painters who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but there are
others who, thanks to their art and intelligence, transform a yellow spot
into the sun." - Pablo Picasso





-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On Behalf Of Hank Murrow
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2005 11:20 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Re: Advancer shelves??


On Jul 18, 2005, at 2:05 PM, Gordon Ward wrote:

> Susan,
>
> I bought some of the first generation Norton Chrystar shelves many
> years ago (after back surgery) and I believe they are very similar to
> the now somewhat more affordable Advancers. A few years ago I mixed a
> glaze incorrectly (left out the clay) and the glaze ran down onto the
> shelves. After years of nary a drip, my heart dropped at the sight.
> I scrubbed much of it off with an old broken kiln shelf and the little
> remaining came off with a dremel tool. It wasn't nearly as bad as it
> looked and ultimately didn't hurt any of the shelves! I continue, in
> lieu of kiln wash, with a dusting of alumina powder (the granular
> kind) as Hank showed me many years ago. The pots can shrink without
> sticking as though on ball bearings.

Dear Gordon and Susan;

I used Crystar originally, but they were prone to failure after awhile.
The Advancers are a product MUCH more suitable for potters, and have
performed flawlessly for me. Spills are easy to pop off with a very
sharp and small chisel. They are so dense, they don't absorb glaze. As
Gordon says, I use alumina......perhaps 80 mesh, spreading it on the
setters with a carbide grooved block.

Do have to keep them dry......I use a light bulb in the bottom of the
cabinet I keep them in.

Cheers, Hank
www.murrow.biz/hank

____________________________________________________________________________
__
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Gordon Ward on tue 19 jul 05


Hi Hank,

I haven't ever had a Chrystar shelf fail, but I'm using the smaller 12
x 24. I've has a few develop an edge crack and a few warped after
maybe 150 firings. 80% are still "like new" dead flat.

Gordo

On Jul 18, 2005, at 8:19 PM, Hank Murrow wrote:

> On Jul 18, 2005, at 2:05 PM, Gordon Ward wrote:
>
>> Susan,
>>
>> I bought some of the first generation Norton Chrystar shelves many
>> years ago (after back surgery) and I believe they are very similar to
>> the now somewhat more affordable Advancers. A few years ago I mixed a
>> glaze incorrectly (left out the clay) and the glaze ran down onto the
>> shelves. After years of nary a drip, my heart dropped at the sight.
>> I scrubbed much of it off with an old broken kiln shelf and the little
>> remaining came off with a dremel tool. It wasn't nearly as bad as it
>> looked and ultimately didn't hurt any of the shelves! I continue, in
>> lieu of kiln wash, with a dusting of alumina powder (the granular
>> kind) as Hank showed me many years ago. The pots can shrink without
>> sticking as though on ball bearings.
>
> Dear Gordon and Susan;
>
> I used Crystar originally, but they were prone to failure after awhile.
> The Advancers are a product MUCH more suitable for potters, and have
> performed flawlessly for me. Spills are easy to pop off with a very
> sharp and small chisel. They are so dense, they don't absorb glaze. As
> Gordon says, I use alumina......perhaps 80 mesh, spreading it on the
> setters with a carbide grooved block.
>
> Do have to keep them dry......I use a light bulb in the bottom of the
> cabinet I keep them in.
>
> Cheers, Hank
> www.murrow.biz/hank
>
> _______________________________________________________________________
> _______
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>

Gordon Ward on tue 19 jul 05


Hi Rikki,

The idea of loose alumina in the kiln was questionable to me at first.
I thought that it might end up on the pots. This hasn't been the case.
The wax alumina mixture is a good way to go too and is effective for
keeping lids from sticking. As far as posts go, I dip the ends of
mine in a very thin wash, consisting of equal volumes of kaolin and
alumina. They don't stick.

Gordon


On Jul 19, 2005, at 8:37 AM, Rikki Gill wrote:

> I would like to add that I mix alumina hydrate with the wax I paint on
> the
> bottoms of my pots prior to glazing, and on the bottoms of my kiln
> posts,
> and that also prevents sticking. [Personally, I don't like free
> alumina on
> the shelves.] A spatula -like scraper lifts up any drips, or a silicone
> carbide easily removes a bad patch.
>
> Posts stick to advancers more than mullite or high alumina shelves,
> and
> require more of a clean up. I tried k-wool paper under the posts, and
> decided it's not worth the trouble, so now I wax posts as I place them
> in
> the kiln. It helps a lot. I think advancers are more than worth the
> money.
> I fire to cone 11, and there is no warpage.
>
> Rikki Gill
> www.rikkigillceramics.com
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Hank Murrow"
> Subject: Re: Advancer shelves??
>
>
>> On Jul 18, 2005, at 2:05 PM, Gordon Ward wrote:
>>
>>> Susan,
>>>
>>>
>
> _______________________________________________________________________
> _______
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>

Susan Giddings on tue 19 jul 05


Rikki,
Thanks very much! I like the idea of using Wax Resist with alumina hydrate
in it. In a co-op environment with students I'm not sure free alumina would
be wise.

-------------------------------------------------
Susan Giddings
Bloomfield, Connecticut; New England
North East Coast; USA

"There are painters who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but there are
others who, thanks to their art and intelligence, transform a yellow spot
into the sun." Pablo Picasso





-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On Behalf Of Rikki Gill
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2005 11:38 AM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Re: Advancer shelves??


I would like to add that I mix alumina hydrate with the wax I paint on the
bottoms of my pots prior to glazing, and on the bottoms of my kiln posts,
and that also prevents sticking. [Personally, I don't like free alumina on
the shelves.] A spatula -like scraper lifts up any drips, or a silicone
carbide easily removes a bad patch.

Posts stick to advancers more than mullite or high alumina shelves, and
require more of a clean up. I tried k-wool paper under the posts, and
decided it's not worth the trouble, so now I wax posts as I place them in
the kiln. It helps a lot. I think advancers are more than worth the money.
I fire to cone 11, and there is no warpage.

Rikki Gill
www.rikkigillceramics.com


----- Original Message -----
From: "Hank Murrow"
Subject: Re: Advancer shelves??


> On Jul 18, 2005, at 2:05 PM, Gordon Ward wrote:
>
> > Susan,
> >
> >

____________________________________________________________________________
__
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Hank Murrow on tue 19 jul 05


On Jul 19, 2005, at 7:10 AM, Gordon Ward wrote:

> Hi Hank,
>
> I haven't ever had a Chrystar shelf fail, but I'm using the smaller 12
> x 24. I've has a few develop an edge crack and a few warped after
> maybe 150 firings. 80% are still "like new" dead flat.
>
> Gordo

Dear Gordo;

All but two of my Crystars developed edge cracks and led to them
breaking right down the middle during the firing. Since I use the
'ledged' posting, there was minimal damage. St. Gobain does not
recommend them for potters as the Advancers have proved more reliable
for potters' usages. Perhaps your larger kiln is easier on them during
the cooling?

Cheers, Hank
www.murrow.biz/hank