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help: packing wholesale stuff

updated thu 7 apr 05

 

primalmommy on tue 5 apr 05


I have ten lidded pots to ship, about the size of a child's head. Jeff
brought home big sturdy computer boxes from work, and I have lots of
other shapes and sizes, but I can't decide -- more, smaller boxes, or
one or two big heavy ones?

I am putting each pot in its own (recycled) small box, with wadded
newspaper in the bottom, and paper around the sides. I remove the lid,
put wadded paper across the top of the pot and then a layer of big
bubble wrap, then roll up the lid in a full sheet of newspaper and tape
the bundle down to the top of the pot/across the rim of the box.

I found a big box that would hold four of the little boxes, put wadded
paper in the bottom, put the boxes in (pretty tight, but with some paper
on all sides and between) and then filled the top with more wadded
paper.

It weighs about 15 pounds. The buyer is paying shipping and wants to use
UPS. I haven't taped up the box yet because I could easily pack the
whole 10 in individual boxes in a double layer (separated by cardboard)
in one of the big boxes jeff broought home. But would it be too heavy?
And how many darn newspapers are they paying to ship? I know they are
heavy, but they're what I have handy.

I have been shipping pots for years, priority mail, double-free-boxed. I
got good enough finally to stop paying for insurance on them. But I am
boggled at the thought of shipping 10 at once.

If anybody has an insight on the pros and cons of shipping
big/heavy/together or small/separately, please share!

I will lie awake now picturing Richard's scenario, the 70 pounder
ramming my package... it just makes me sick to think of all those
glorious NCECA pots broken. Maybe it was the helpful folks at the
loading dock. I know mel packs carefully -- I got a big box of newspaper
once cushioning alittle box of newspaper with a treasure inside... I
kept the box with his logo, it's high on a shelf in my studio, full of
old ceramics monthlies.

Tomorrow or the next day, I expect to get a call from the post office
downtown. I have driven there every spring to pick up a box of day old
chicks from Iowa. This time I'll be going to pick up my bees. According
to the bee listserver I have joined, postal workers are particularly
eager to have customers come and collect those particular packages.
Nothing like a wire mesh box of 10,000 ticked off, hungry bees. David, I
bet if you had packed your pot in bees it would have been handled with
care.

"3 pounds of Italians and a queen". I love how that sounds, like an
opera or a fable.

I understand it's a very zen thing to load a box of bees into a hive.

(without wetting your pants.)
I'm already having moments of "What was I thinking?"

But I just found out Phil Poburka is raising orphaned nestling
hummingbirds, who need a special fluid fed with a tube.. He sent me baby
pictures. If he can do that, I can figure out bees.

Yours
Kelly in Ohio -- off to rummage in hubby's pockets for tooth fairy money
for sleeping molly-pie.. I hope the tooth fairy is investing it in an
IRA because orthodonture won't be far behind.

P.S. Louis and Vince: it's not ammonia flavored. It's more like if you
made tea by soaking a teabag of Copenhagen snuff in a hot cup of Ouzo.
It's addictive stuff... I wonder if the hotel has a "lost and found"
department where the bag is languishing...










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pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET on wed 6 apr 05


Hi Kelly,


How much one of these weighs is a larger consideration in
some ways, than how large it is...so far as the forces of
inertia or acceleration to which it will be subjected in
various collisions.

Insurance will not likely ever pay any of us for damage, on
anything, let alone something 'fragile', at least not that I
know of, unless m-a-y-b-e there is a Fork Lift Fork 'hole'
punched through it or a Tire Tread over it. But even then
they may balk. I have had UPS balk in a BIG way when
literally, there WAS a forklift prong hole through the Box,
and they still were very unpleasant about
how-do-they-know-I-packaged-it-correctly and so on...

Insurance WILL tend to pay for outright 'loss', meaning, if
or when the Shipper lost the parcel.

If these weigh what a Teapot would generally weigh if this
size, I, as me, would ship them individually, wrapped snugly
in two-inch thick soft Foam rubber ( was my post to Mel lost
to everyone? Lol...) and have two layers of the two-inch
soft foam Rubber...with the thusly wrapped item squeezed
gently into a Box...and that Box is the 'first' Box.

Between the first Box and the second Box, I would have three
or four inches on all sides of soft Foam Rubber scraps or
cut sheets to size, or else, for this outer layer, soft
crushed-crumpled Newspaper.

I would then go to sleepy-pie-time, feeling I had done my
best...and sleeping like a proverbial buh-hay-beeee.

Used, free, soft or mediun soft or not-so-soft Foam rubber
of various thicknesses or densities from soft to hard, may
be had of any concern which does re-upholstery. Usually they
make piles of it and throw it away every few days. New Foam
Rubber is not expensive for that matter, being available
from these same or other concerns.

Usually I prefer the used Foam Rubber, about all I can carry
in one trip, and I tip them nicely with a Five, and everyone
is all smiles.


Best wishes,


Phil
el ve





----- Original Message -----
From: "primalmommy"


> I have ten lidded pots to ship, about the size of a
child's head. Jeff
> brought home big sturdy computer boxes from work, and I
have lots of
> other shapes and sizes, but I can't decide -- more,
smaller boxes, or
> one or two big heavy ones?
>
> I am putting each pot in its own (recycled) small box,
with wadded
> newspaper in the bottom, and paper around the sides. I
remove the lid,
> put wadded paper across the top of the pot and then a
layer of big
> bubble wrap, then roll up the lid in a full sheet of
newspaper and tape
> the bundle down to the top of the pot/across the rim of
the box.
>
> I found a big box that would hold four of the little
boxes, put wadded
> paper in the bottom, put the boxes in (pretty tight, but
with some paper
> on all sides and between) and then filled the top with
more wadded
> paper.
>
> It weighs about 15 pounds. The buyer is paying shipping
and wants to use
> UPS. I haven't taped up the box yet because I could easily
pack the
> whole 10 in individual boxes in a double layer (separated
by cardboard)
> in one of the big boxes jeff broought home. But would it
be too heavy?
> And how many darn newspapers are they paying to ship? I
know they are
> heavy, but they're what I have handy.
>
> I have been shipping pots for years, priority mail,
double-free-boxed. I
> got good enough finally to stop paying for insurance on
them. But I am
> boggled at the thought of shipping 10 at once.
>
> If anybody has an insight on the pros and cons of shipping
> big/heavy/together or small/separately, please share!
>
> I will lie awake now picturing Richard's scenario, the 70
pounder
> ramming my package... it just makes me sick to think of
all those
> glorious NCECA pots broken. Maybe it was the helpful folks
at the
> loading dock. I know mel packs carefully -- I got a big
box of newspaper
> once cushioning alittle box of newspaper with a treasure
inside... I
> kept the box with his logo, it's high on a shelf in my
studio, full of
> old ceramics monthlies.
>
> Tomorrow or the next day, I expect to get a call from the
post office
> downtown. I have driven there every spring to pick up a
box of day old
> chicks from Iowa. This time I'll be going to pick up my
bees. According
> to the bee listserver I have joined, postal workers are
particularly
> eager to have customers come and collect those particular
packages.
> Nothing like a wire mesh box of 10,000 ticked off, hungry
bees. David, I
> bet if you had packed your pot in bees it would have been
handled with
> care.
>
> "3 pounds of Italians and a queen". I love how that
sounds, like an
> opera or a fable.
>
> I understand it's a very zen thing to load a box of bees
into a hive.
>
> (without wetting your pants.)
> I'm already having moments of "What was I thinking?"
>
> But I just found out Phil Poburka is raising orphaned
nestling
> hummingbirds, who need a special fluid fed with a tube..
He sent me baby
> pictures. If he can do that, I can figure out bees.
>
> Yours
> Kelly in Ohio -- off to rummage in hubby's pockets for
tooth fairy money
> for sleeping molly-pie.. I hope the tooth fairy is
investing it in an
> IRA because orthodonture won't be far behind.
>
> P.S. Louis and Vince: it's not ammonia flavored. It's more
like if you
> made tea by soaking a teabag of Copenhagen snuff in a hot
cup of Ouzo.
> It's addictive stuff... I wonder if the hotel has a "lost
and found"
> department where the bag is languishing...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

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John Jensen on wed 6 apr 05


I do believe there is an advantage to fitting more objects into a large box,
vs. each object in it's own box. Every time I figure it, it comes out that
way.
I've also come to the conclusion that the weight of wadded newspaper is so
much greater than plastic peanuts that the peanuts pay for themselves in
saved shipping costs.

John Jensen, Mudbug Pottery
John Jensen@mudbugpottery.com
http://www.toadhouse.com www://www.mudbugpottery.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of primalmommy
I am putting each pot in its own (recycled) small box, with wadded
newspaper in the bottom, and paper around the sides. I remove the lid,
put wadded paper across the top of the pot and then a layer of big
bubble wrap, then roll up the lid in a full sheet of newspaper and tape
the bundle down to the top of the pot/across the rim of the box.

I found a big box that would hold four of the little boxes, put wadded
paper in the bottom, put the boxes in (pretty tight, but with some paper
on all sides and between) and then filled the top with more wadded
paper.

I have been shipping pots for years, priority mail, double-free-boxed. I
got good enough finally to stop paying for insurance on them. But I am
boggled at the thought of shipping 10 at once.

If anybody has an insight on the pros and cons of shipping
big/heavy/together or small/separately, please share!

Dave Finkelnburg on wed 6 apr 05


Kelly,
I use a simple rule of thumb that the package should be easy to handle. That means if your pots weigh 5 pounds, don't put 10 in a box. If your pots weigh a pound, 10 in a box is fine. You do want to figure the weight of packaging materials, though. It sounds like all 10 of your pots will make a box of more than 40 pounds gross weight, more than I would be comfortable giving to UPS for fragile ware.
As you know well, immobilizing the pot is the key to keeping it from being damaged in shipping. IF you use paper, use sturdy paper, or enough, so the weight of the pot isn't going to compress the paper, thus allowing the pot to start slopping around in the box. I favor recycled bubble wrap when I can get it because I don't worry about it compressing somewhere between me and the customer.
If you look at glassware, it's usually packed in cardboard with cardboard dividers, so the glass can't move. Being immobilized, not much more packing is needed for the inner box.
As you know, you want at least 3 inches of packing between the inner and outer boxes.
Good shipping!
Dave Finkelnburg

primalmommy wrote:
I have ten lidded pots to ship, about the size of a child's head. I can't decide -- more, smaller boxes, or one or two big heavy ones?
I I found a big box that would hold four of the little boxes, put wadded
paper in the bottom, put the boxes in (pretty tight, but with some paper
on all sides and between) and then filled the top with more wadded
paper. It weighs about 15 pounds.

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