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corks for teapots?

updated sun 6 feb 05

 

Marvin Klotz on wed 2 feb 05


Well if the cork was a tight one and the teapot spout the only air
hole, it would make pouring a cuppa tea a bit of an adventure I would think.

Regards,

Joan Klotz

At 01:07 PM 2/2/2005, you wrote:
>Has anyone got experience with corks for teapots instead of regular lids?
>Either in use or ones you make...
>
>I have an idea for a pot design that would look cool with a bark topped cork.
>
>I am wondering if it would affect functionality-other than making the
>"lid" stay on

Elizabeth Priddy on wed 2 feb 05


Has anyone got experience with corks for teapots instead of regular lids?
Either in use or ones you make...

I have an idea for a pot design that would look cool with a bark topped cork.

I am wondering if it would affect functionality-other than making the "lid" stay on

Thanks
Elizabeth




Elizabeth Priddy

252-504-2622
1273 Hwy 101
Beaufort, NC 28516
http://www.elizabethpriddy.com

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pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET on wed 2 feb 05


Hi Elizabeth,



Just remember to have a little hole somewhere, in the Tea
Pot's upper area, or, in the Cork itself, or a groove on the
Cork's side, so when pouring, the Tea Pot is not trying to
pull a vaccuum...


Phil
el ve

----- Original Message -----
From: "Elizabeth Priddy"

> Has anyone got experience with corks for teapots instead
of regular lids?
> Either in use or ones you make...
>
> I have an idea for a pot design that would look cool with
a bark topped cork.
>
> I am wondering if it would affect functionality-other than
making the "lid" stay on
>
> Thanks
> Elizabeth

Elizabeth Priddy on thu 3 feb 05


So I need to make an air hole in the top of the pot. No problem.

Is there any "tea" reason not to use a cork?

pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET wrote:
Hi Elizabeth,



Just remember to have a little hole somewhere, in the Tea
Pot's upper area, or, in the Cork itself, or a groove on the
Cork's side, so when pouring, the Tea Pot is not trying to
pull a vaccuum...


Phil
el ve



Elizabeth Priddy

252-504-2622
1273 Hwy 101
Beaufort, NC 28516
http://www.elizabethpriddy.com
__________________________________________________
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pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET on thu 3 feb 05


Hi Elizabeth,


I can think of no reason for a Cork not to be just fine.

All the old style Thermous Bottles used them, for hot Coffee
and hot Tea...and they were allways nice.

While Cork may be difficult to cut, it sands readily ( as on
a Belt Sander, with a fine Belt ideally, ) for shaping if
need be...


Phil
el ve

----- Original Message -----
From: "Elizabeth Priddy"


> So I need to make an air hole in the top of the pot. No
problem.
>
> Is there any "tea" reason not to use a cork?
>
> pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET wrote:
> Hi Elizabeth,
>
>
>
> Just remember to have a little hole somewhere, in the Tea
> Pot's upper area, or, in the Cork itself, or a groove on
the
> Cork's side, so when pouring, the Tea Pot is not trying to
> pull a vaccuum...
>
>
> Phil
> el ve
>
>
>
> Elizabeth Priddy
>
> 252-504-2622
> 1273 Hwy 101
> Beaufort, NC 28516
> http://www.elizabethpriddy.com
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection
around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>
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Janet Kaiser on fri 4 feb 05


LOL! Imagine a tight fitting cork stuck on a
teapot, the way a cork fits into a bottle?! What
would you do to remove the cork...? One way of
annoying clients I would not chose myself! No,
not a good idea. Cork expands and it does not
like fluctuations in temperature, least of all if
you add moisture plus steam. The discolouration
and blackening would be off-putting. Even if not
life-threatening, it would be enough to give the
germ police the screaming hab-jabs. Unless this
is a non-functional teapot which nobody would
ever be able to use?

Sincerely

Janet Kaiser

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>I have an idea for a pot design that would look
cool with a bark topped
>cork.
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Anne Webb on sat 5 feb 05


>So I need to make an air hole in the top of the pot. No problem.
>
>Is there any "tea" reason not to use a cork?
>

i missed your original post. why is it again that you want to use a cork for
your teapot? ...a quick fix or an aesthetic thing?

if you're just using your tpot for decoration, i guess a cork would be fine.
Otherwise keep your corks for storage jars.

Its one thing to cap a bottle of wine with a cork, but with regular exposure
to steam from the boiling water required to make tea, i honestly dont know
how a cork would hold up. Doesnt sound very sanitary and would be rather
difficult to clean. I can just imagine how your tea would taste as well..
bleah.
personally, imho, I would stick with ceramic.

best of luck :)

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