search  current discussion  categories  glazes - cone 4-7 

specturm glaze@cone 6 report

updated mon 27 sep 04

 

Mark Strayer on mon 20 sep 04


For all of you who helped me debug my firing technique Thank You. I opened
my kiln lid last night and was rewarded with almost perfect results. No
bubbles at all in the glase.

Things I did:
1. Preheated my bisque fire for 8 hrs at 180 degrees before cone fire
program kicked in. Fired Cone 03
2. Fired cone 5 instead of Cone 6

I also took a big step forward by making my first glaze. I made Powder
Blue out of Ron Roys book and had great results.

I do have one question. I used Orton cones for the first time. I used both
cone 5 and cone 6. I fired the kiln at Cone 5 and even my orton 6 slumped
over about half way...does this mean my kiln is firing to hot. Temperature
readout tells me the temperature and everything looks OK . My kiln has 3"
brick and that may keep the kiln hotter longer...would that effect the
Orton cones? NOTE: I had cones on all three shelves and one set in the
middle and all the cones acted the same way.

Thanks again everyone.
Mark
North Star Pottery
Lamar, MO

Arnold Howard on mon 20 sep 04


Mark, Orton self-supporting cones reach maturity when the tip of the cone is
even with the top of the cone base. This is not quite 6 o'clock.

It sounds like your kiln fired slightly too hot or that the last part of the
firing was too slow. If the results are good, you might be better off not
making a temperature correction for your next firing.

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
arnoldhoward@att.net / www.paragonweb.com

From: "Mark Strayer"
> I do have one question. I used Orton cones for the first time. I used both
> cone 5 and cone 6. I fired the kiln at Cone 5 and even my orton 6 slumped
> over about half way...does this mean my kiln is firing to hot. Temperature
> readout tells me the temperature and everything looks OK .

Jim Smola on mon 20 sep 04


Way to go Mark! Proof again don't trust those readouts on computer
controlled kilns....cones are your TRUE temperature gage!

And of course...the book you took the glaze recipe from is testimonial again
to the book itself Mastering ^6 Glazes! :-)

(I'm tellin' you Roy--I'm pluggin' that book the best I can!)


----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Strayer"
To:
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2004 4:49 PM
Subject: Specturm Glaze@Cone 6 Report


> For all of you who helped me debug my firing technique Thank You. I
opened
> my kiln lid last night and was rewarded with almost perfect results. No
> bubbles at all in the glase.
>
> Things I did:
> 1. Preheated my bisque fire for 8 hrs at 180 degrees before cone fire
> program kicked in. Fired Cone 03
> 2. Fired cone 5 instead of Cone 6
>
> I also took a big step forward by making my first glaze. I made Powder
> Blue out of Ron Roys book and had great results.
>
> I do have one question. I used Orton cones for the first time. I used both
> cone 5 and cone 6. I fired the kiln at Cone 5 and even my orton 6 slumped
> over about half way...does this mean my kiln is firing to hot. Temperature
> readout tells me the temperature and everything looks OK . My kiln has 3"
> brick and that may keep the kiln hotter longer...would that effect the
> Orton cones? NOTE: I had cones on all three shelves and one set in the
> middle and all the cones acted the same way.
>
> Thanks again everyone.
> Mark
> North Star Pottery
> Lamar, MO
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.
>

Snail Scott on tue 21 sep 04


At 04:49 PM 9/20/2004 -0400, you wrote:
>...I fired the kiln at Cone 5 and even my orton 6 slumped
>over about half way...does this mean my kiln is firing to hot. Temperature
>readout tells me the temperature and everything looks OK.


Yes, it's too hot! If the cones say ^6,
then you fired to ^6, regardless of what
the computer's pyrometer may say. You
need to adjust your firing settings to
reflect the information that the cones
gave you.

My kiln has 3"
>brick and that may keep the kiln hotter longer...would that effect the
>Orton cones?


Anything that affects cones is also
affecting your clay the same way!
That's why cones are so important as
an information source. Unlike a mere
temperature readout, the cones truly
reflect what's happening to your work.

If you thought you were firing to ^5
and the cones say ^6, believe the
cones. So, if you thought you were
firing to ^6 before, you may have
actually been firing to ^7 or more.

However, the extra insulation will
not affect the reading of the cones.
The insulation may slow the cooling
(usually a good thing), but that
won't change the cone reading, which
only records the temperature going
up. The extra insulation may also
make your firings faster and more
energy-efficient, but the cones will
still give the correct reading of
what is happening to the clay inside.

-Snail Scott

Cynthia Bracker on tue 21 sep 04


Yea! I'm so happy to hear it! As for the difference between the
programmed 5 and what the cones say, it is common for there to be a cone
or possibly even two cone discrepancy. (Although usually the other way
around) The important thing is that all the cones in the kiln read the
same. This is VERY good! Also, from your description, you probably hit
about cone 5 1/2, which is really close, all things considered. My
advice at this point, since the results were good, is to continue with
what you have been doing. Be sure to keep your cones and label them
with the date of the firing. If you don't already keep a firing log,
start one. Write an entry down with details of the firing. You don't
HAVE to use witness cones for every firing (although many people do) but
at least use them every time you change something, whether it be a
firing program or just trying a new glaze.

Also, on a picky note, Mastering Cone 6 Glazes was written by Ron Roy
AND John Hesselberth.

Congrats again!
Cindy Bracker

Mark Strayer wrote:

>For all of you who helped me debug my firing technique Thank You. I opened
>my kiln lid last night and was rewarded with almost perfect results. No
>bubbles at all in the glase.
>
>Things I did:
>1. Preheated my bisque fire for 8 hrs at 180 degrees before cone fire
>program kicked in. Fired Cone 03
>2. Fired cone 5 instead of Cone 6
>
>I also took a big step forward by making my first glaze. I made Powder
>Blue out of Ron Roys book and had great results.
>
>I do have one question. I used Orton cones for the first time. I used both
>cone 5 and cone 6. I fired the kiln at Cone 5 and even my orton 6 slumped
>over about half way...does this mean my kiln is firing to hot. Temperature
>readout tells me the temperature and everything looks OK . My kiln has 3"
>brick and that may keep the kiln hotter longer...would that effect the
>Orton cones? NOTE: I had cones on all three shelves and one set in the
>middle and all the cones acted the same way.
>
>Thanks again everyone.
>Mark
>North Star Pottery
>Lamar, MO
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>
>
>
>

Mark Strayer on tue 21 sep 04


Thanks Cynthia! I was so relieved when I open my kiln and everthing looke=
d
so good. I owe most my sucess to you, your mom and David. Please thank
them all for me.
>-- Original Message --
>Date: Tue, 21 Sep 2004 11:07:29 -0500
>Reply-To: Clayart
>From: Cynthia Bracker
>Subject: Re: Specturm Glaze@Cone 6 Report
>To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>
>
>Yea! I'm so happy to hear it! As for the difference between the
>programmed 5 and what the cones say, it is common for there to be a cone=

>or possibly even two cone discrepancy. (Although usually the other way
>around) The important thing is that all the cones in the kiln read the
>same. This is VERY good! Also, from your description, you probably hit=

>about cone 5 1/2, which is really close, all things considered. My
>advice at this point, since the results were good, is to continue with
>what you have been doing. Be sure to keep your cones and label them
>with the date of the firing. If you don't already keep a firing log,
>start one. Write an entry down with details of the firing. You don't
>HAVE to use witness cones for every firing (although many people do) but=

>at least use them every time you change something, whether it be a
>firing program or just trying a new glaze.
>
>Also, on a picky note, Mastering Cone 6 Glazes was written by Ron Roy
>AND John Hesselberth.
>
>Congrats again!
>Cindy Bracker
>
>Mark Strayer wrote:
>
>>For all of you who helped me debug my firing technique Thank You. I op=
ened
>>my kiln lid last night and was rewarded with almost perfect results. No=

>>bubbles at all in the glase.
>>
>>Things I did:
>>1. Preheated my bisque fire for 8 hrs at 180 degrees before cone fire
>>program kicked in. Fired Cone 03
>>2. Fired cone 5 instead of Cone 6
>>
>>I also took a big step forward by making my first glaze. I made Powder=

>>Blue out of Ron Roys book and had great results.
>>
>>I do have one question. I used Orton cones for the first time. I used
both
>>cone 5 and cone 6. I fired the kiln at Cone 5 and even my orton 6 slump=
ed
>>over about half way...does this mean my kiln is firing to hot. Temperat=
ure
>>readout tells me the temperature and everything looks OK . My kiln has
3"
>>brick and that may keep the kiln hotter longer...would that effect the
>>Orton cones? NOTE: I had cones on all three shelves and one set in the
>>middle and all the cones acted the same way.
>>
>>Thanks again everyone.
>>Mark
>>North Star Pottery
>>Lamar, MO
>>
>>_______________________________________________________________________=
_______
>>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pcl=
ink.com.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>________________________________________________________________________=
______
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pcli=
nk.com.

Steve Slatin on thu 23 sep 04


John --

Some of us can't see the cones too well when
everything's white hot. I've tried different
goggles, adding polarizing filters, etc. --
through red heat I'm OK, beyond that, can't
see a thing.

Thermocouples may be an inferior solution for
those who can 'read' the cones well, but if
you can't they're extremely useful -- as are
computerized firing programs.

I use cones to tell me what happened -- then I use
what I learned to adjust the controller for
the next run.

-- Steve Slatin

--- John Hesselberth wrote:

>
> Hi Mark,
>
> I can't resist stepping in here. To answer one
> question, a half a cone
> will often not make a difference, but why not fire
> to the specified
> cone using cones as your reference? Relying on
> thermocouples and
> automatic programs is always a bad option.

=====
Steve Slatin -- Entry-level potter, journeyman loafer, master obfuscator
Sequim, Washington, USA
48.0937N, 123.1465W or thereabouts

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

Ron Roy on thu 23 sep 04


Hi mark,

All pyrometers read differt temperatures - I have to program my controller
higher to get my cones to bend right.

Use cones - watch them - and you will find the right temperature to set to
get the right cone bend - easy to do. After a few fings you will be able to
get the right results - just keep notes.

Do your own programs - the auto programs are bound to give bad results -
unless you pyrometer is close to reading right.

Howard - is there a way on controllers to reset the pyrometer reading?

RR

>For all of you who helped me debug my firing technique Thank You. I opened
>my kiln lid last night and was rewarded with almost perfect results. No
>bubbles at all in the glase.
>
>Things I did:
>1. Preheated my bisque fire for 8 hrs at 180 degrees before cone fire
>program kicked in. Fired Cone 03
>2. Fired cone 5 instead of Cone 6
>
>I also took a big step forward by making my first glaze. I made Powder
>Blue out of Ron Roys book and had great results.
>
>I do have one question. I used Orton cones for the first time. I used both
>cone 5 and cone 6. I fired the kiln at Cone 5 and even my orton 6 slumped
>over about half way...does this mean my kiln is firing to hot. Temperature
>readout tells me the temperature and everything looks OK . My kiln has 3"
>brick and that may keep the kiln hotter longer...would that effect the
>Orton cones? NOTE: I had cones on all three shelves and one set in the
>middle and all the cones acted the same way.
>
>Thanks again everyone.
>Mark

Ron Roy
RR#4
15084 Little Lake Road
Brighton, Ontario
Canada
K0K 1H0
Phone: 613-475-9544
Fax: 613-475-3513

Mark Strayer on thu 23 sep 04


Hi Ron,
I have a new this year Skutt 12 sided with their automatic programable op=
tion.
So yes to your question...I'm using Skutt's preprogramed firing schedule=

for Cone 5. Cynithia Bracker wrote that I probably hit Cone 5 1/2 if the=

Cone 6 Orton was half bent down. Do you need to be too concerned over a
1/2 of cone difference?

I'm using your book...thanks. My brother also gave me your computer prog=
ram
which I haven't gotten into yet. I look forward to checking it out.

Mark
North Star Pottery
Lamar, MO
>-- Original Message --
>Date: Thu, 23 Sep 2004 01:14:08 -0500
>Reply-To: Clayart
>From: Ron Roy
>Subject: Re: Specturm Glaze@Cone 6 Report
>To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>
>
>Hi mark,
>
>All pyrometers read differt temperatures - I have to program my controll=
er
>higher to get my cones to bend right.
>
>Use cones - watch them - and you will find the right temperature to set
to
>get the right cone bend - easy to do. After a few fings you will be able=

>to
>get the right results - just keep notes.
>
>Do your own programs - the auto programs are bound to give bad results
-
>unless you pyrometer is close to reading right.
>
>Howard - is there a way on controllers to reset the pyrometer reading?
>
>RR
>
>>For all of you who helped me debug my firing technique Thank You. I op=
ened
>>my kiln lid last night and was rewarded with almost perfect results. No=

>>bubbles at all in the glase.
>>
>>Things I did:
>>1. Preheated my bisque fire for 8 hrs at 180 degrees before cone fire
>>program kicked in. Fired Cone 03
>>2. Fired cone 5 instead of Cone 6
>>
>>I also took a big step forward by making my first glaze. I made Powder=

>>Blue out of Ron Roys book and had great results.
>>
>>I do have one question. I used Orton cones for the first time. I used
both
>>cone 5 and cone 6. I fired the kiln at Cone 5 and even my orton 6 slump=
ed
>>over about half way...does this mean my kiln is firing to hot. Temperat=
ure
>>readout tells me the temperature and everything looks OK . My kiln has
3"
>>brick and that may keep the kiln hotter longer...would that effect the
>>Orton cones? NOTE: I had cones on all three shelves and one set in the
>>middle and all the cones acted the same way.
>>
>>Thanks again everyone.
>>Mark
>
>Ron Roy
>RR#4
>15084 Little Lake Road
>Brighton, Ontario
>Canada
>K0K 1H0
>Phone: 613-475-9544
>Fax: 613-475-3513
>
>________________________________________________________________________=
______
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pcli=
nk.com.

John Hesselberth on thu 23 sep 04


On Thursday, September 23, 2004, at 01:55 PM, Mark Strayer wrote:

> I have a new this year Skutt 12 sided with their automatic programable
> option.
> So yes to your question...I'm using Skutt's preprogramed firing
> schedule
> for Cone 5. Cynithia Bracker wrote that I probably hit Cone 5 1/2 if
> the
> Cone 6 Orton was half bent down. Do you need to be too concerned over
> a
> 1/2 of cone difference?
>
> I'm using your book...thanks. My brother also gave me your computer
> program
> which I haven't gotten into yet. I look forward to checking it out.

Hi Mark,

I can't resist stepping in here. To answer one question, a half a cone
will often not make a difference, but why not fire to the specified
cone using cones as your reference? Relying on thermocouples and
automatic programs is always a bad option. In fact I NEVER recommend
using the manufacturers preprogrammed cycles. For one thing NONE of
them include slow cooling to my knowledge. But just as important,
develop your own firing cycle to give the results you want. If you fire
with a plain vanilla firing cycle you are just about guaranteed plain
vanilla results. I know for sure most of our glazes won't be their best
with a canned cycle.

Regards,

John

John Hesselberth
http://www.frogpondpottery.com
http://www.masteringglazes.com

william schran on fri 24 sep 04


Steve wrote:>Some of us can't see the cones too well when
everything's white hot. I've tried different
goggles, adding polarizing filters, etc. --
through red heat I'm OK, beyond that, can't
see a thing.<

If you look back through the archives I'm sure you'll find various
suggestions for viewing cones. Using proper safety glasses is more
for eye protection than for seeing the cones, though they do help
doing that also.

Some suggestions that have helped my students are: making sure when
the kiln is loaded that the cone pack is positioned such that an
element is directly in sight behind the cones. The other method uses
a light to shine on the cones.

My method goes back to the days of undergrad school with our gas
fired kilns belching smoke & flame. One had to take a deep breath,
pull out the spy hole brick, sneak up on the foot long flame coming
out of the spy hole and blow like crazy while looking at the cones.

I continue to use this method. When I load the kiln, I place the cone
pack near the top spy hole (so I don't have to bend over so much or
get down on my knees). When checking the cones, I now put on the
safety glasses, pull out spy hole plug, take a breath and blow into
the spy hole. This cools the edges of the cones allowing me to see
them.

I have never not been able to see the cones no matter what the temperature.

Bill

Arnold Howard on fri 24 sep 04


I have found that if you silhouette the cones in front of an element groove,
you can see them even at cone 10. This requires a clear path from the
peephole to the element groove on the opposite kiln wall.

The lower part of the cone should be silhouetted, not the cone tip.
Otherwise the cone will disappear from view when it bends. The closer the
cone is to the peephole, the more difficult it is to see. You should also
wear firing safety glasses.

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
arnoldhoward@att.net / www.paragonweb.com

From: "Steve Slatin"
> Some of us can't see the cones too well when
> everything's white hot. I've tried different
> goggles, adding polarizing filters, etc. --
> through red heat I'm OK, beyond that, can't
> see a thing.

Gay Judson on fri 24 sep 04


William Schran wrote:
>"When checking the cones, I now put on the
> safety glasses,..."

Bill, I know this has been discussed in the archives, but I did not find a
definitive answer. So, what protective glasses do you use? Where do you
get them? I have gathered that what I want is IR protection but I have not
found a place to buy that locally and the offerings on the web are so wide
ranging that I get confused every time I look. I have old eyes and not
well--have to take care of them! Will appreciate any guidance offered!

Gay Judson
San Antonio, Tx

william schran on fri 24 sep 04


Gay wrote:> So, what protective glasses do you use? Where do you
get them? I have gathered that what I want is IR protection...<

I currently use a pair of glasses that came with a new L&L kiln we
purchased for school.

Ward Burner (no affiliation) sells 24K gold coated didymium safety
viewing glasses. Here's the site link:
http://www.wardburner.com/protective.cfm

Other suppliers will also have safety glasses for this purpose.

Bill

Steve Slatin on fri 24 sep 04


Bill --

I've tried putting it closer to the peep, farther away
rom the peep, elevated slightly above it, etc. I've
tried to use a mini-maglite to illuminate it, a big
honking 6-v battery flashlight, and a few others.
I have tried to align it with the element holder at
the opposite side of the kiln, and have tried leaving
a path on the shelf between the peep and the back
side of the kiln (where the element holder is), and
leaving a stilt directly behind the cone. I've
tried blowing (both quickly, and long-slow breath,
but no matter what I do, I can't get enough contrast
to see the cone at white heat well enough to tell
where it is.

Nevertheless, I can adjust for the shift in
thermocouple sensitivity by putting cones in each
region of my kiln and examining them carefully after
each firing, then making adjustments. I admire those
of you who can see the cones. I just find that
although I can't, with an electric kiln and
thermocouples I don't absolutely need to.

Thanks for the thoughts -- Steve S.



--- william schran wrote:

> If you look back through the archives I'm sure
> you'll find various
> suggestions for viewing cones. Using proper safety
> glasses is more
> for eye protection than for seeing the cones, though
> they do help
> doing that also.
>

=====
Steve Slatin -- Entry-level potter, journeyman loafer, master obfuscator
Sequim, Washington, USA
48.0937N, 123.1465W or thereabouts



_______________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today!
http://vote.yahoo.com

Ron Roy on sat 25 sep 04


Hi Steve,

If it's an electric kiln a short blast of cold air into the spy hole - at
the cone will show em up perfect. I use a tube - about an inch from the spy
hole - just be careful not to inhale close to the kiln - it works like a
charm.

Not very effective with a gas kiln however. There are times when I have to
take extreme measures - but first - remember - if you need glasses to see
properly - have them on.

If you insert an iron bar - close to the cones - it will draw enough heat
from them and you will see em easy - the bar comes out hot of course -
don't mess with the hot end.

I wish somebody would find something to put behind cones so they would be
easy to see - there must be something.

RR


>Some of us can't see the cones too well when
>everything's white hot. I've tried different
>goggles, adding polarizing filters, etc. --
>through red heat I'm OK, beyond that, can't
>see a thing.
>
>Thermocouples may be an inferior solution for
>those who can 'read' the cones well, but if
>you can't they're extremely useful -- as are
>computerized firing programs.
>
>I use cones to tell me what happened -- then I use
>what I learned to adjust the controller for
>the next run.
>
>-- Steve Slatin

Ron Roy
RR#4
15084 Little Lake Road
Brighton, Ontario
Canada
K0K 1H0
Phone: 613-475-9544
Fax: 613-475-3513

Bonnie Staffel on sat 25 sep 04


I don't know if this is wise or not, but it sure works for me. I brush a
wipe of iron oxide on the forward edge of the cone. It shows up very well.
I also do the blowing operation, but the oxide shows up without that. I
have been told that this will change the bending of the cone, but in an
electric kiln, and with my glazes being not delicate, it seems to work well
for me. I also have non-painted cones in other parts of the kiln and they
all seem to operate the same as the witness cone behind the top peep hole.

Regards,

Bonnie Staffel
http://webpages.charter.net/bstaffel
http://www.vasefinder.com/
Potters Council member

Steve Slatin on sat 25 sep 04


Ron --

I have not tried either the iron bar or blow-pipe
methods. I will experiment (carefully!) with them
on my next firing.

As I see it, the problem with putting anything in
the kiln as a backdrop is that at full temp everything
is glowing white, backdrop and cone both. Hence there
is no contrast and (except for those with very good
eyesight) little to focus on.

I'd rather be able to 'read' cones if I could.
Thanks!

Regards -- Steve Slatin

--- Ron Roy wrote:

> Hi Steve,
>
> If it's an electric kiln a short blast of cold air
> into the spy hole - at
> the cone will show em up perfect. I use a tube -
> about an inch from the spy
> hole - just be careful not to inhale close to the
> kiln - it works like a
> charm.
>
> Not very effective with a gas kiln however. There
> are times when I have to
> take extreme measures - but first - remember - if
> you need glasses to see
> properly - have them on.
>
> If you insert an iron bar - close to the cones - it
> will draw enough heat
> from them and you will see em easy - the bar comes
> out hot of course -
> don't mess with the hot end.
>
> I wish somebody would find something to put behind
> cones so they would be
> easy to see - there must be something.
>
> RR
>
>
> >Some of us can't see the cones too well when
> >everything's white hot. I've tried different
> >goggles, adding polarizing filters, etc. --
> >through red heat I'm OK, beyond that, can't
> >see a thing.
> >
> >Thermocouples may be an inferior solution for
> >those who can 'read' the cones well, but if
> >you can't they're extremely useful -- as are
> >computerized firing programs.
> >
> >I use cones to tell me what happened -- then I use
> >what I learned to adjust the controller for
> >the next run.
> >
> >-- Steve Slatin
>
> Ron Roy
> RR#4
> 15084 Little Lake Road
> Brighton, Ontario
> Canada
> K0K 1H0
> Phone: 613-475-9544
> Fax: 613-475-3513
>
>
______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change
> your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
> reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>


=====
Steve Slatin -- Entry-level potter, journeyman loafer, master obfuscator
Sequim, Washington, USA
48.0937N, 123.1465W or thereabouts

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

Ivor and Olive Lewis on sun 26 sep 04


Dear Ron Roy,
It is my understanding (from memory, based on a report by Tim
Fredrich) that chilling cones to view them was not a good thing to do.
It delays or retards the setting rate of the cone so the rest of the
interior of the kiln, the furniture and the load tends to become
heated to excess.
In essence, work will be overfired when the cone sets.
Best regards,
Ivor Lewis.
Redhill,
S. Australia.