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studio lighting question

updated wed 18 aug 04

 

claybair on tue 10 aug 04


Bill,
Mine buzz no matter what I do!
Now they go off altogether... last night I finished
loading the kiln with a flashlight. They are only 4 years
old. I was talked into using them by the lighting expert...
I should have trusted my instincts!
I detest them and am looking to replace them.
I want lighting that is retractable & will take a 100+ bulb.
I want the ability to pull them down when I need extra light.
Does anyone know where I can get something like I have described?
My search online was fruitless.

Gayle Bair
Bainbridge Island, WA
http://claybair.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On Behalf Of william
schran
Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2004 3:40 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Re: Studio Lighting question


Candace/Norm wrote:>I would dearly love a better lighting
system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting recommended. I'd
appreciate any feedback from folks who are using this or who have a better
way which is quiet and gives adequate light.<

Have you tried daylight balanced florescent lamps? I have a 48"
shoplight fixture that I changed from the usual florescent bulbs to
daylight (5500K) bulbs and it made a world of difference. Just
recently installed a second fixture with the daylight lamps. First
set has been working for about 7 years.
Bill

____________________________________________________________________________
__
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Candace Young/Norman Czuchra on tue 10 aug 04


Hello,

Having lived with cheap shop fluroscents for 30 years and building a new
studio, I could use some advice. I would dearly love a better lighting
system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting recommended. I'd
appreciate any feedback from folks who are using this or who have a better
way which is quiet and gives adequate light.

Thank you
Candace Young Mailto:candace@bayriverpottery.com
Norm Czuchra Mailto:norm@bayriverpottery.com

(252) 745-4749
107 S. Water Street
PO Box 394
Bayboro, NC 28515

http://bayriverpottery.com

Hank Murrow on tue 10 aug 04


On Aug 10, 2004, at 8:50 AM, Candace Young/Norman Czuchra wrote:

> Hello,
>
> Having lived with cheap shop fluroscents for 30 years and building a
> new
> studio, I could use some advice. I would dearly love a better lighting
> system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting recommended.
> I'd
> appreciate any feedback from folks who are using this or who have a
> better
> way which is quiet and gives adequate light.

Track lighting of both the lo voltage and regular is good for seeing
the form. I have trouble getting shadows with fluorescent light. In my
own studio, I use par 30 and Par 40 bulbs aimed at the floor. They are
on around 4' centers and work great.

Cheers, Hank
murrow.biz/hank

Carl Finch on tue 10 aug 04


At 11:50 AM 8/10/2004 -0400, Candace Young/Norman Czuchra wrote:

>Having lived with cheap shop fluroscents for 30 years and building a new
>studio, I could use some advice. I would dearly love a better lighting
>system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting recommended.

Fluorescent lighting has come a LONG way in those 30 years!

I put up with those cheapos in my garage for 30 years--dim in cold weather,
slow to start (if at all in the cold), flickering, hummy. In outfitting my
new workshop I "discovered" that there are now low temperature (start
instantly, down to something like 0 degrees F), high output tubes and
fixtures.

I bought 8-foot, 2-tube fixtures and couldn't be more pleased. The clerk
(it was an electrical supply store) cautioned me that they do hum a
bit--moreso than the 4-footers. And that is true, though it doesn't bother
me. Each tube puts out 110 watts--220 watts per fixture. I don't know
about the 8 footers, but I recall that the 4-foot tubes are available in
SEVERAL colors/shades.

My fixtures cost $50 each--far more than the light-weight cheapos are more
commonly available at big box stores. The difference is in the
ballast. (And you might want to investigate electronic ballasts--something
I was unaware of a couple years ago when I bought mine.)

Halogen track lighting might be particularly helpful for task lighting--to
light specific, smaller areas. But they do throw a bit of heat. I have a
track of three in my kitchen (I think they're 50 watters) and find them to
be "dramatic" but not very even in illumination. The area lit (sink) looks
pretty from a distance, but working at the sink I find bright spots and
shadow areas.

Luxesto!

--Carl
in Medford, Oregon

william schran on tue 10 aug 04


Candace/Norm wrote:>I would dearly love a better lighting
system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting recommended. I'd
appreciate any feedback from folks who are using this or who have a better
way which is quiet and gives adequate light.<

Have you tried daylight balanced florescent lamps? I have a 48"
shoplight fixture that I changed from the usual florescent bulbs to
daylight (5500=B0K) bulbs and it made a world of difference. Just
recently installed a second fixture with the daylight lamps. First
set has been working for about 7 years.
Bill

Maurice Weitman on tue 10 aug 04


At 11:50 -0400 on 8/10/04, Candace Young/Norman Czuchra wrote:
>Hello,
>
>Having lived with cheap shop fluroscents for 30 years and building a new
>studio, I could use some advice. I would dearly love a better lighting
>system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting recommended. I'd
>appreciate any feedback from folks who are using this or who have a better
>way which is quiet and gives adequate light.

Hello, Candace and Norman,

About the only thing I can say good about halogen=20
lights is that they produce lots of heat. Well,=20
they're also quiet, but currently-made=20
fluorescent fixtures are also quiet.

The color of its lighting is usually pretty good=20
(if run at full brightness), but their economy is=20
dreadful, both in terms of initial cost,=20
replacement frequency and cost, and electricity=20
usage.

I would strongly recommend that you get=20
fluorescent lights again, but there are several=20
options for you to consider.

The most significant from my perspective is the=20
color of the light. Several manufacturers (GE,=20
Phillips, etc.) make a bulb that is tuned to=20
5,000=BA which is supposed to represent natural sun=20
light, Don't let the name "Daylight" used on=20
common bulbs confuse you; it's a very warm color=20
and not good for your vision or accurate color=20
rendition. Other bulbs are called=20
"full-spectrum" and they may also be good.

Modern (newer than 30 years, at least) fixtures=20
have ballasts that do not require starters, which=20
yours might. Very cheap fixtures might also hum=20
when on. I've recently bought "shop lights" from=20
Home Depot for less than $20. They're quiet,=20
very reflective, have a pull-chain switch, and=20
with the 5,000=BA bulbs, give off a very nice light=20
with good energy efficiency.

There's another type of fixture and bulb that is=20
even more efficient; the fixtures have electronic=20
ballasts which are more expensive, but they may=20
pay for themselves in reduced energy costs over=20
time. When I did the math in the store, I wasn't=20
convinced. You may be.

That's my five cents; I hope it helps.

Good luck.

Regards,
Maurice still enjoying the daily commute to=20
Berkeley (where I've just about finished changing=20
the lighting as outlined above), even though=20
Celia got to see a Golden Eagle in a marsh she=20
was visiting with a bunch of other teachers.

Jeanette Harris on tue 10 aug 04


>Hello,
>
>Having lived with cheap shop fluroscents for 30 years and building a new
>studio, I could use some advice. I would dearly love a better lighting
>system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting recommended. I'd
>appreciate any feedback from folks who are using this or who have a better
>way which is quiet and gives adequate light.
>
>Thank you
>Candace Young Mailto:candace@bayriverpottery.com
>Norm Czuchra Mailto:norm@bayriverpottery.com

I found some shop lights at Lowe's that are halogen bayonet lights
that work wonderfully for me. They are long--about 2 1/2 feet long,
tubular, with the lights shielded behind a glass pane and has chrome
grating over the glass. They come with chains on both ends and can
be hung from the ceiling. They give great light and some warmth
during the cold months. That and a boost from a small
radiator-heater gives me all the heat I need in my studio. Each light
has a long cord and a plug, so when I redid my studio, I had them
mounted on the ceiling on chains and had outlets put in so that they
plugged right in. They also have pull-cord on/off switches so that
you can limit the use of them or have them all on. I'll check and
see if there is any kind a brand or manufacturer on the tubing and
get back to you.

Cheers,
--
Jeanette Harris
in Poulsbo WA

Anne Webb on wed 11 aug 04


hey candace.. i went to your web page. just curious.. i couldnt pull up some
of the larger formats of the pictures on your web page. what do you use to
pierce your pots? do u have these tools custom made? i've done some
piercing but used an exacto knife.
thanks..anne


>From: Candace Young/Norman Czuchra
>Reply-To: Clayart
>To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>Subject: Studio Lighting question
>Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 11:50:43 -0400
>
>Hello,
>
>Having lived with cheap shop fluroscents for 30 years and building a new
>studio, I could use some advice. I would dearly love a better lighting
>system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting recommended. I'd
>appreciate any feedback from folks who are using this or who have a better
>way which is quiet and gives adequate light.
>
>Thank you
>Candace Young Mailto:candace@bayriverpottery.com
>Norm Czuchra Mailto:norm@bayriverpottery.com
>
>(252) 745-4749
>107 S. Water Street
>PO Box 394
>Bayboro, NC 28515
>
>http://bayriverpottery.com
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>melpots@pclink.com.

_________________________________________________________________
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wayne on wed 11 aug 04


Gayle,
I don't know if you're too concerned with fashion, but Harbor
Freight and Northern Tool (among others) sell
pull down "trouble lights" as you would see in garages. Reel mounts
on the wall or near the ceiling, hand held light (available in
fluorescent and halogen too) pulls out and retracts as needed.
Not the prettiest thing, though.

Have you checked for those "pull-down" kitchen fixtures, with the
metal shade? They're still sold. They only take a 60w bulb,
though, IIRC.

Best,

Wayne Seidl
Key West, Florida, USA
North America, Terra
Latitude 81.45W, Longitude 24.33N
Elevation 3.1 feet (1m)
----- Original Message -----
From: "claybair"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2004 1:43 AM
Subject: Re: Studio Lighting question


> Bill,
> Mine buzz no matter what I do!
> Now they go off altogether... last night I finished
> loading the kiln with a flashlight. They are only 4 years
> old. I was talked into using them by the lighting expert...
> I should have trusted my instincts!
> I detest them and am looking to replace them.
> I want lighting that is retractable & will take a 100+ bulb.
> I want the ability to pull them down when I need extra light.
> Does anyone know where I can get something like I have described?
> My search online was fruitless.
>
> Gayle Bair
> Bainbridge Island, WA
> http://claybair.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On Behalf Of
william
> schran
> Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2004 3:40 PM
> To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
> Subject: Re: Studio Lighting question
>
>
> Candace/Norm wrote:>I would dearly love a better lighting
> system and have had low voltage halogen track lighting
recommended. I'd
> appreciate any feedback from folks who are using this or who have
a better
> way which is quiet and gives adequate light.<
>
> Have you tried daylight balanced florescent lamps? I have a 48"
> shoplight fixture that I changed from the usual florescent bulbs
to
> daylight (5500K) bulbs and it made a world of difference. Just
> recently installed a second fixture with the daylight lamps. First
> set has been working for about 7 years.
> Bill
>
>
____________________________________________________________________
________
> __
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your
subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
>
____________________________________________________________________
__________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your
subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.
>

Larry Davidson on sat 14 aug 04


Candace,
If you are trying to save some money with your new lights try getting new
electronic ballasts for T-8 lights and new bulbs T-8 for your old lights.
I just redid some eight footers and saved about $20.00 over new lights.

Larry

Deborah Pratt on tue 17 aug 04


I know this is a little behind the thread, but my brother used to have a telephone in his hangar that was on a weighted pulley system as his office was in a lofted area and he quickly tired of running after the phone. Maybe an option for close-up lighting? I'm also tempted to use a very old doctor's fluorescent lamp (the kind with the magnifying glass in it) I found at the side of the road once upon a time... it does buzz rather unmercifully though...
Deb, in Indiana, getting ready for the crush of the first day of fall term




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