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clay times: safety to a higher standard

updated wed 2 jun 04

 

Joseph Coniglio on wed 26 may 04


Maybe I missed an issue where safety was a topic. So for any of my
comments without knowing your extensive archive would be unfair, but
I noticed a few things, that, well, sort of bother me and I want to tell you
about them, briefly:

Creativity should not compromise safety.

Current

1) MAY/JUNE ISSUE: Page 26: Peter's Valley Craft and Education
Center Advertisment. ---cute contrived ad---where's the eye
protection?

--the magazine would never turn down revenues for rejecting an ad
based on my precieved lack of safety.

2) Page 42: Building a Kiln Drum. The article is very informative. I'm
tempted to do this myself. The woman in the photo is handling
ceramic fiber: Caption reads "Respirator and gloves should be worn
at all times when handling ceramic fiber"

She (technically WAS NOT wearing a respirator---though some of
these masks are called respirators) She had (what appeared to be)
on a Five and Dime dust mask used by carpenters when sanding
gypsum. This did not seem like adequate protection. Health
problems associated with respiration take a long time to show up.

Please be careful. All pottery shops and classrooms should have
masks and a really good HEPA grade respirator or two.

I suggest an article that features safety gear. A pottery supply
company could take the lead for safety and place safety gear in an ad.

JoeC

Cindy Bracker on wed 26 may 04


Dust Mask vs Respirator
The way it has been explained to me (please feel free to update my
information, it is somewhat old, but still valid I think), A Dust Mask (like
the disposable ones that I think you are referencing) will block air-borne
particulates such as that arrising from Ceramic Fiber or chemicals or
whatever. A Respiriator will also block hazardous gasses. Corrections to
this are welcome. At any rate, the disposable masks are

"NIOSH approved for particulates under 42 CFR 84. Approved as an N95 -
Particulate Filter (95% filter efficiency level) effective against
particulate aerosols free of oil; time use restrictions may apply."
-from the box on MSA Model Number 7-1553-1 (The Affinity Plus mask that most
supliers sell)
Cindy

On Wed, 26 May 2004 13:03:27 -0400, Joseph Coniglio
wrote:

>2) Page 42: Building a Kiln Drum. The article is very informative. I'm
>tempted to do this myself. The woman in the photo is handling
>ceramic fiber: Caption reads "Respirator and gloves should be worn
>at all times when handling ceramic fiber"
>
>She (technically WAS NOT wearing a respirator---though some of
>these masks are called respirators) She had (what appeared to be)
>on a Five and Dime dust mask used by carpenters when sanding
>gypsum. This did not seem like adequate protection. Health
>problems associated with respiration take a long time to show up.
>
>Please be careful. All pottery shops and classrooms should have
>masks and a really good HEPA grade respirator or two.
>
>I suggest an article that features safety gear. A pottery supply
>company could take the lead for safety and place safety gear in an ad.
>
>JoeC

John Hesselberth on wed 26 may 04


On Wednesday, May 26, 2004, at 03:09 PM, Cindy Bracker wrote:

> At any rate, the disposable masks are
>
> "NIOSH approved for particulates under 42 CFR 84. Approved as an N95 -
> Particulate Filter (95% filter efficiency level) effective against
> particulate aerosols free of oil; time use restrictions may apply."
> -from the box on MSA Model Number 7-1553-1 (The Affinity Plus mask
> that most
> supliers sell)

Hi Cindy,

These masks are virtually useless against silica particles (probably
the biggest in-studio hazard potters face). I don't know if they are
adequate for ceramic fiber dust or not. One with a P100 rating is what
is needed for silica. The best articles I have seem on this subject
were written by Monona Rossol in Clay Times in the Nov/Dec 1999 and
Jan/Feb 2000 issues. P100 rated masks are available for $30-$50 from
industrial supply or industrial safety firms, e.g. Grainger and others.

Regards,

John

John Hesselberth
http://www.frogpondpottery.com
http://www.masteringglazes.com

Edouard Bastarache Inc. on wed 26 may 04


Cindi,

you may try 3M 8511 N95 Particulate Respirator

Use:
1- Solids such as those from processing minerals, coal, iron ore, and
certain other substances.
2-Liquids or non-oil based particles from sprays that do not also emit
harmful vapors.

Suggested applications :
1-Grinfing
2-Sanding
3-Sweeping
4-Bagging
5-Other dusty/hot operations

At least 95% filtration efficiency when subjected to 0.3 Ám MMAD Sodium
Chloride particle challenge.

More information on crystalline silica :

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/npgd0553.html


Later,


"Ils sont fous ces quebecois"
Edouard Bastarache
Irreductible Quebecois
Indomitable Quebeker
Sorel-Tracy
Quebec
edouardb@sorel-tracy.qc.ca
http://sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
http://www.digitalfire.com/education/toxicity/

Bobbruch1@AOL.COM on tue 1 jun 04


Cindy Bracker:
>=A0At any rate, the disposable masks are
> "NIOSH approved for particulates=20
under 42 CFR 84.=A0 Approved as an N95 -
> Particulate Filter (95% filter efficiency level)=20
effective against
> particulate aerosols free of oil;=20
John Hesselberth responds
//////////These masks are virtually useless=20
against silica particles (probably
the biggest in-studio hazard potters face).=20
I don't know if they are
adequate for ceramic fiber dust or not.=20
One with a P100 rating is what
is needed for silica. The best articles=20
I have seem on this subject
were written by Monona Rossol in=20
Clay Times in the Nov/Dec 1999 and
Jan/Feb 2000 issues. P100 rated masks
are available for $30-$50 from
industrial supply or industrial safety firms,=20
e.g. Grainger and others.

Just checked out my cartridge which is now
the "norm" sold at Home Depot, and it is
rated P100. For years, the mask
sold for ceramic purposes at various vendors
was N95, so the mass marketers have
gotten attuned to the need for more
stringent safety requirements. Somewhat sorry
to hear that the masks I used in the 90's were
not effective for silica dust.

Bob Bruch