search  current discussion  categories  forms - plates 

large plates

updated wed 21 apr 04

 

ROBERT HAECKL on sun 18 apr 04


Hello Everyone,

I'm new to this site or board, but it seems to be very informational. =20

My question is this; I'm starting to throw larger platters, (20" or =
bigger) and I was wondering what ideas people had about keeping the mess =
down. I'm using a larger bat that sits above my splash pans and it just =
gets all over the place. The last time I had plastic over my legs, a =
piece of cardboard in front of the wheel with a large sponge next to =
that, but it still went everywhere. Any help would be great.

Thanks, Bob
Boulder, CO

pdp1@EARTHLINK.NET on mon 19 apr 04


Hi Bob,


An old fashioned Work Apron, as ties in the
back...'Cotton'...white even...


Phil
el vee


----- Original Message -----
From: "ROBERT HAECKL"


Hello Everyone,

I'm new to this site or board, but it seems to be very
informational.

My question is this; I'm starting to throw larger platters,
(20" or bigger) and I was wondering what ideas people had
about keeping the mess down. I'm using a larger bat that
sits above my splash pans and it just gets all over the
place. The last time I had plastic over my legs, a piece of
cardboard in front of the wheel with a large sponge next to
that, but it still went everywhere. Any help would be
great.

Thanks, Bob
Boulder, CO

Mike Gordon on mon 19 apr 04


> Robert,
Use less water! My students throw large pots all the time and don't
get too messy, after all high school students must look cool at all
times, only the very dedicated don't mind the clay. I keep all the
splash pans in the original boxes they come with new wheels. The kids
don't know they exist and use less water. Mike Gordon


> The last time I had plastic over my legs, a piece of cardboard in
> front of the wheel with a large sponge next to that, but it still went
> everywhere. Any help would be great.

On Apr 18, 2004, at 7:40 PM, ROBERT HAECKL wrote:

daniel on mon 19 apr 04


Hi Robert,

I expect that you'll get more info from people who do this more than I do
but here's my 0.02.

I have had exactly the same experience and I have tried the plastic bag
thingie. The basic problem is too much water I think and most likely during
centering. I have seen Claudio Reginato in a workshop (he throws without a
splash pan at all) throw a decent size platter with virtually no spattering.
He uses very dry clay and throws very dry. He seems to be very strong and
his technique seems for me to require a fair bit of strength.

As an alternative which I have yet to try but which rings well with a
number of things mentioned on the list recently is a method described in two
consecutive PMI issues. I just got these recently as back issues. Here the
method proposed is to use soft clay and slap to centre. Then having done
that slap it out into a flat pancake. By this time most of the work is done
and no water has yet been added. One then adds water sufficient to clean up
the bottom and form the rim. One thing I do find helps is not to add to much
water on the outside of the ring of clay which forms the rim. This keeps the
water that is used inside the rim. Anyhow the issues I'm talking about may
be worth a look. They are March/April and May/June 2003. Articles are by
Samuel Hoffman.

Thanx
D

Donald G. Goldsobel on mon 19 apr 04


If you put a large mason's sponge touching the bat edge (maybe two at
different locations) it will pick up the water on each go around of the
wheel. Throw slower and with as little water as needed. I find a big flat
rib and a good sponge take the place of flooding the work with water .

Donald
----- Original Message -----
From: "daniel"
To:
Sent: Monday, April 19, 2004 8:51 AM
Subject: Re: Large plates


> Hi Robert,
>
> I expect that you'll get more info from people who do this more than I do
> but here's my 0.02.
>
> I have had exactly the same experience and I have tried the plastic bag
> thingie. The basic problem is too much water I think and most likely
during
> centering. I have seen Claudio Reginato in a workshop (he throws without a
> splash pan at all) throw a decent size platter with virtually no
spattering.
> He uses very dry clay and throws very dry. He seems to be very strong and
> his technique seems for me to require a fair bit of strength.
>
> As an alternative which I have yet to try but which rings well with a
> number of things mentioned on the list recently is a method described in
two
> consecutive PMI issues. I just got these recently as back issues. Here the
> method proposed is to use soft clay and slap to centre. Then having done
> that slap it out into a flat pancake. By this time most of the work is
done
> and no water has yet been added. One then adds water sufficient to clean
up
> the bottom and form the rim. One thing I do find helps is not to add to
much
> water on the outside of the ring of clay which forms the rim. This keeps
the
> water that is used inside the rim. Anyhow the issues I'm talking about may
> be worth a look. They are March/April and May/June 2003. Articles are by
> Samuel Hoffman.
>
> Thanx
> D
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Michael Wendt on mon 19 apr 04


Bob,
I made a splash capture pan using a Formica covered
counter top cut into a circular form with a cut out for
the wheel head shaft.
Tack lawn edging at the correct height for your application
and caulk it with silicone caulk. Trim the bottom excess.
Cleats on the bottom of the new pan can secure it to the
old splash pan.
Regards,
Michael Wendt
Wendt Pottery
2729 Clearwater Ave
Lewiston, ID 83501
wendtpot@lewiston.com
www.wendtpottery.com
Bob asked:
My question is this; I'm starting to throw larger platters, (20" or bigger)
and I was wondering what ideas people had about keeping the mess down. I'm
using a larger bat that sits above my splash pans and it just gets all over
the place. The last time I had plastic over my legs, a piece of cardboard
in front of the wheel with a large sponge next to that, but it still went
everywhere. Any help would be great.

Thanks, Bob

Susan Giddings on tue 20 apr 04


Well, as we're all adding our 2 cents, I thought I'd throw mine in as well!
The technique that Daniel describes from the PMI article is one I have used
rather extensively for years and it is effective. I've had carpal tunnel and
trigger thumb surgery and it's now the only way I can make platters that
big. (Well, I just got back from Mel's workshop where I learned a new way to
center so I plan to explore that technique.)

As Daniel mentions, I have found that this is a lot easier to handle with
very soft clay. (And don't forget, soft clay already has a lot of water in
it.) I throw fairly "dry" and only use slip, but I also throw slowly. I
think that is far more important. People who are able to throw very quickly
can use a lot more water than someone like me, the clay will hold up to it.
So I start with soft clay that is easily pounded and slapped into center. I
shoot for a shape that would be close to the way it would look if thrown to
center and opened in a more traditional wheel thrown way. Then, I coat my
hands with thick slip (or water if that's what you use) and just work on
evening out the wall thickness and transitioning the bottom to the side on
the inside. Any irregularity is quickly evened out. I only use a slow wheel
speed and keep myself rock steady. I brace my arms on my thighs when I am
sitted and if i am standing, really lean into it. (I think this may be very
difficult to do with a fast wheel speed.) Once it starts evening out, it's
surprisingly easy. Then I just work on the contours. Also, I use thick ribs.
(Chris Henly's thumper is wonderful for this!) Once you get it all smoothed
out, it is surprisingly easy to throw and finish. Wire off 1 or 2 days after
throwing. Oh, I guess I should add that when making these, I take the splash
pan off. The bat's too big and the 2 piece splash pan has to go. And I'm not
trying to be boastful or anything, but when done and I walk away, no clay
anywhere on me except my hands and forearms. No globs of clay/slip on the
floor or surrounding wheels and people either. Slow speed, I think is the
key. Maybe no water is, too, but I'm not really sure about that.

I'd guess from start to finish, it may take me 20-30 minutes to make one.
I'm not in a position where I need to rush and, like I said before, I do
take my time. From all the slapping around, compression is good and I never
get any kind of cracks anywhere on the platters. I've made as big as 27"
bone dry diameter. Can't wait for new kiln that has bigger capacity. I don't
know if this way will work for anyone else, but I find it less stressful to
myself as well as to the clay. And I certainly have had good luck doing it.
Check it out if you are so inclined. If I recall the PMI articles, it is
very close to the way I've done it. It can be a really successful way. FWIW,
I learned several years ago from a young potter traveling here with his wife
from Japan. It was a great workshop. It was amazing to see him make a
platter almost 4' in diameter by just slapping the clay.

HTH,
S



>Here the
>method proposed is to use soft clay and slap to centre. Then having done
>that slap it out into a flat pancake. By this time most of the work is done
>and no water has yet been added.

------------------
Susan Giddings

"There are painters who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but there are
others who, thanks to their art and intelligence, transform a yellow spot
into the sun." Pablo Picasso

_________________________________________________________________
Lose those love handles! MSN Fitness shows you two moves to slim your waist.
http://fitness.msn.com/articles/feeds/article.aspx?dept=exercise&article=et_pv_030104_lovehandles