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transporting unfired glazed work

updated tue 13 apr 04

 

Rikki Gill on sat 10 apr 04


I wonder if the shrink wrap, if left on the pots, would create toxic fumes.
I know the Tozan is outside, but still, it might be something to wonder
about in the case of other kilns. Rikki
----- Original Message -----
From: "Fredrick Paget"
To:
Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 7:58 PM
Subject: Re: transporting unfired glazed work


> >Hi!
> >
> >I glaze my pottery at my studio at home and transport them in the back of
> >my van to the kiln which is several miles from my studio. Is there
> >something I can do to safely transport my pots so that the glaze is not
> >rubbed off in transit? thanks!
> Ron in Kansas City
>
> Ron,
> I have the similar problem . You don't say if the work is bisque or
> if you can bisque fire at home as I do. I then glaze the work and
> bisque fire again. Most glazes harden up enough so that I can pack
> them and drive for two days to the Tozan kiln.
>
> If you don't have a kiln at home it is a different story. Try shrink
> wrapping the ware. You need a shrink wrap setup of a heat gun and
> impulse sealer. Harbor freight has the sealers cheap and a paint
> stripper heat gun will work. I save all the shrink wrap I get and
> recycle it. You can also buy the film in rolls. I haven't tried it
> yet but I bet you wouldn't even have to unwrap the ware . The wrap
> should burn off ok.
> Fred
> --
> From Fred Paget, Marin County, California, USA
> fredrick@well.com
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
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>
>

Ron McCrary on sat 10 apr 04


Hi!

I glaze my pottery at my studio at home and transport them in the back of
my van to the kiln which is several miles from my studio. Is there
something I can do to safely transport my pots so that the glaze is not
rubbed off in transit? thanks!

Ron in Kansas City

Fredrick Paget on sat 10 apr 04


>Hi!
>
>I glaze my pottery at my studio at home and transport them in the back of
>my van to the kiln which is several miles from my studio. Is there
>something I can do to safely transport my pots so that the glaze is not
>rubbed off in transit? thanks!
Ron in Kansas City

Ron,
I have the similar problem . You don't say if the work is bisque or
if you can bisque fire at home as I do. I then glaze the work and
bisque fire again. Most glazes harden up enough so that I can pack
them and drive for two days to the Tozan kiln.

If you don't have a kiln at home it is a different story. Try shrink
wrapping the ware. You need a shrink wrap setup of a heat gun and
impulse sealer. Harbor freight has the sealers cheap and a paint
stripper heat gun will work. I save all the shrink wrap I get and
recycle it. You can also buy the film in rolls. I haven't tried it
yet but I bet you wouldn't even have to unwrap the ware . The wrap
should burn off ok.
Fred
--
From Fred Paget, Marin County, California, USA
fredrick@well.com

sdr on sat 10 apr 04


Ron asked:
>
glaze my pottery at my ......transport them in the back of
> my van to the ...... something I can do to safely transport my ...

There are a couple of things you can do: you can re-bisque
after glazing, if you have a bisque kiln at home. You can wax
the pieces - a bit of a pain. You can add a bit of glue (elmer's
works) to the glaze BEFORE you glaze. Those are a few.
All troublesome. It would be easier, perhaps, to take the pieces
and glaze to where the kiln is, and glaze there.

regards

Dannon Rhudy

Ron McCrary on sun 11 apr 04


In a message dated 4/10/2004 10:45:27 PM Central Daylight Time,
dannon@CCRTC.COM writes:
There are a couple of things you can do: you can re-bisque
after glazing, if you have a bisque kiln at home. You can wax
the pieces - a bit of a pain. You can add a bit of glue (elmer's
works) to the glaze BEFORE you glaze. Those are a few.
All troublesome. It would be easier, perhaps, to take the pieces
and glaze to where the kiln is, and glaze there.
thank you!

Donald G. Goldsobel on sun 11 apr 04


Try a liberal tight wrap of large bubble wrap and you have protection from
breakage and smudging.

D
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron McCrary"
To:
Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 10:31 AM
Subject: transporting unfired glazed work


> Hi!
>
> I glaze my pottery at my studio at home and transport them in the back of
> my van to the kiln which is several miles from my studio. Is there
> something I can do to safely transport my pots so that the glaze is not
> rubbed off in transit? thanks!
>
> Ron in Kansas City
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Donalson on sun 11 apr 04


If you have access to a spray booth, a very simple and very effective =
solution is to spray a diluted elmers glue and water mixture on the =
glazed piece. I frequently use a mix of about 2.5 parts glue and 7.5 =
parts of water. With this method even tenmoku's are sealed over enough =
to all but eliminate even finger marks.=20

Craig AZ

Fredrick Paget on sun 11 apr 04


>I wonder if the shrink wrap, if left on the pots, would create toxic fumes.
>I know the Tozan is outside, but still, it might be something to wonder
>about in the case of other kilns. Rikki
Rikki,
A quick Google says the shrink wrap stuff is made of PVC (polyvinyl chloride).
Burning that stuff makes a sooty flame and the products of combustion
will contain a little chloride of some sort, probably hydrochloric
acid? Kind of nasty but not actually toxic - just corrosive. Bad for
the lungs and eyes. Your stomach acid is hydrochloric acid so it is
not poison. I would not want to burn it in a closed room.
Outdoors it would be unnoticeable since there is such a tiny amount
of it compared to the hundreds of pounds of wood thrown into the
Tozan . A decent size gas kiln would exhaust the tiny amount of smoke
up the chimney and it would not be a big deal.
Fred
--
From Fred Paget, Marin County, California, USA
fredrick@well.com

Vince Pitelka on sun 11 apr 04


> There are a couple of things you can do: you can re-bisque
> after glazing, if you have a bisque kiln at home.

I would be wary of this. Up to red heat, a glaze is designed to stick to
the pot initially via the mechanical "jigsaw-puzzle" bond of the glaze
interlocking into the clay surface. After that, we rely on flexibility of
the pyroplastic glaze coating to allow it to remain in place on the clay
while the glassy phase develops. The glaze coating is sintered, but it
isn't really well-bonded to the surface until the glassy phase becomes quite
active, and on a high-fire pot, that won't have happened by bisque
temperatures. I have seen cases where a glaze firing is interrupted at
bisque temperature or below. In some cases, without the bond of a true
glassy phase, the differential shrinkage between the sintered glaze and clay
can cause the glaze to separate and flake off either upon cooling, or on
refiring. It can be a very nasty business.
Best wishes -
- Vince

Vince Pitelka
Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee Technological University
Smithville TN 37166, 615/597-6801 x111
vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu
http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/
http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/

Phil Smith on mon 12 apr 04


Aquanet hairspary works well.
Gives piece a hard shell.
Do not saturate the work or glaze can get crumbly.

phil...

John Kudlacek on mon 12 apr 04


Hi Neighbor,
Regarding transporting your pots: I have used the following to transport
pots from my spray booth, to shelf to kiln and am sure this should work
for you: After glaze surface is dry, spray with either spray starch, cheap
hair spray, or a solution of white glue and water. A solution of water and
syrup also will work with the advantage of the studio smelling like a
Kiwanis pancake feed when the kiln heats up.When packing these pots so
treated, I would also use the very light weight plastic bags one gets in
the produce section of Wal-Mart. Do not bag the pots, just use the bags as
packing. Regular plastic shopping bags should also work. (Newsprint and
other such papers are too stiff for delicate packing.)
If so treated and packed as prescribed, I am sure your pots will arrive at
Red Star or that other place in fine shape.
John in Topeka

Anne Webb on mon 12 apr 04


i've had to transport unfired glazed work a couple of times in the past and
its a pain in the ....patootie.

I have had success wrapping and packing pots in bubble wrap. Cant get very
many pots in your bin or box but, afterall, you are transporting bisque so
you wanna be careful anyway.
I've also tried wrapping pots generously in dry cleaners plastic (to
minimize abrasion on glaze) and then cushion really well with peanuts,
paper, or carpet underlay (the foam stuff).

Invevitably there would be *some* little chips that would come off the rim
at some point before or while loading (happens especially when least
convenient), more so with some glazes than others. as extra insurance, take
little plastic containers of your glazes for touchup, which you probably
already do anyways.

Its better, of course, as ron says, just take your glazes with you and glaze
there if you can.

best of luck!
anne

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