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amaco velvet underglaze at cone 6

updated tue 1 jul 03

 

Elizabeth Priddy on thu 26 jun 03


This is why I recommend painting into a thin coat of white or clear glaze and then glazing it again with a truly transparent compatible clear. It will solve you probem at any glaze compatible temperature that the velvets will survive to. I have found this works exceptionally well.

May Luk wrote:Hi All;

I have just painted some plates with amaco velvet underglaze and bisqued
them at 1000 C. Then they are glazed with a leadless transparent glaze and
fired to 1240 C). The light red (V383) and the chartreuse (V343) turn the
glaze surface matte, as if there are less glaze on the painted underglaze.
Meanwhile, the Electric Blue (V386) came out nice and the glaze on top was
glossy.

I'm firing a bit higher than the recommanded temp (1040-1220) Could this be
the reason?

T.I.A.

May

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Elizabeth Priddy

www.angelfire.com/nc/clayworkshop
Beaufort, NC

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May Luk on thu 26 jun 03


Hi All;

I have just painted some plates with amaco velvet underglaze and bisqued
them at 1000 C. Then they are glazed with a leadless transparent glaze and
fired to 1240 C). The light red (V383) and the chartreuse (V343) turn the
glaze surface matte, as if there are less glaze on the painted underglaze.
Meanwhile, the Electric Blue (V386) came out nice and the glaze on top was
glossy.

I'm firing a bit higher than the recommanded temp (1040-1220) Could this be
the reason?

T.I.A.

May

Ron Collins on thu 26 jun 03


I use Velvets for my neckpieces, and use the clear recommended in the
"Roy/Hesselberth- Mastering cone 6 glazes.....that glaze gives pretty true
colors under, and I don't have any that go matt at cone 6. Colors that I
use that do very well for me, with a uniform shiny glaze effect, are
chartreuse, lavender, amythyst, red, yellow, true orange, turquoise...you
might try a different clear on top...in fact, none go matt....I recommend
the above glaze....I spray it thinly......it has always worked for me with
slips, underglazes, or whatever.....with no pinholes, if bisque is washed
very well......I use Burkes' Celadon as my liner, with less copper...mother
of pearl, gold, etc also look nice, as the glaze gives a very smooth
cover....I mainly do this on jewelry or special pieces....but you might try
re-bisquing after painting, that's what I do, so that I can wipe off/adjust
glazes...maybe that's the difference....you could try that....it's worth it,
if the piece was a lot of time/trouble, another bisque won't hurt
anything....Melinda Collins, Antigua, Guatemala

May Luk on sat 28 jun 03


Hi Elizabeth;

Thanke for the reply.

Can you elaborate a bit on this technique? Do you mean painting the velvet
with a bit of base glaze before bisque?

I had just make some test tiles: mixing stain with a little bit of base
glaze and paint with the aid of water and glycerine (before going to bisque=
)
, because I have the same problem with some stains not being fully melted
with the top transparent glaze. Still experimenting.

Thank you to Ron and Joanna for your post as well. I know that "Mastering
Cone 6 glazes" is an excellent book. But it's not really available in the U=
K
just yet. Although there's a book review at the Ceramic Review in the
current issue, and it's listed =A338. I think it's going to be sold somewhere=
.

Best Regards
May
London UK


on 6/27/03 7:55 am, Elizabeth Priddy at priddyclay@YAHOO.COM wrote:

> This is why I recommend painting into a thin coat of white or clear glaze=
and
> then glazing it again with a truly transparent compatible clear. It will
> solve you probem at any glaze compatible temperature that the velvets wil=
l
> survive to. I have found this works exceptionally well.

Elizabeth Priddy on sat 28 jun 03


Here is what I do.

Treat the velevets like they are tube watercolors. They mix like that. Thin with water, not glycerine. Apply more than one pass with the brush to double the color. Blend your colors on the brush in the chinese manner.
Don't mix the color with the glaze. That will just make weak glaze color. You dip the whole pot in the base glaze and let it dry. Then brush the surface with a soft dry brush to make it smooth like rice paper. Then paint. Full on color and line and all the detail you want. Then let dry. Then another application of the top transparent glaze with a soft brush and only one coat across your painting. More will make the painting pull off. No pressure, just drag the wet brush across the pot. Then let dry and fire. It will make a truly beautiful painting with depth that is nigh impossible on bisque.

I realize that "in the chinese manner" is vague. It took me years to get this, I can teach to to get started with some fairly snazzy effects in a couple of days. The details are all in "The Mustard Seed Garden Book of Painting", a book you tend to have to mail order. But it is very hard to read and almost impossible to learn from without a practical session or fifty with someone who already understands. I firmly believe that many people describe things as extremely difficult in order to preserve their own expertise and mystique. Most things might be complex but are essentially one foot after the other processes that anyone can learn. Chinese painting is extremely complex when taken as a whole and I am not saying that to puff myself up. I am saying it because it really is hard to do well. You can do it at all and be pretty impressive, but to do it really well takes dedicationa nd patience. It is so like pottery that I consider my eventual mastery of it as the same as my quest
to master my craft of pottery. Sometimes my eyes are bigger than my belly. But I am still working on this plate, thank you...and could you bring me another napkin?


I love to travel. I want to see everywhere and no place is uninteresting to me. For the cost of expenses and meals, I will come teach any group how to do this, anywhere. It will take two days. The water content of the glaze and in the velvets is the issue that is the problem and I can only show you this in person. I have explained it as well as I can above. You can also come here. The coast and the weather is fantastic. This is not a solicitation, I gots me a job. It is an invitation to share something that I truly love.


May Luk wrote:
Hi Elizabeth;

Thanke for the reply.

Can you elaborate a bit on this technique? Do you mean painting the velvet
with a bit of base glaze before bisque?

I had just make some test tiles: mixing stain with a little bit of base
glaze and paint with the aid of water and glycerine (before going to bisque)
, because I have the same problem with some stains not being fully melted
with the top transparent glaze. Still experimenting.

Thank you to Ron and Joanna for your post as well. I know that "Mastering
Cone 6 glazes" is an excellent book. But it's not really available in the UK
just yet. Although there's a book review at the Ceramic Review in the
current issue, and it's listed 38. I think it's going to be sold somewhere.

Best Regards
May
London UK


on 6/27/03 7:55 am, Elizabeth Priddy at priddyclay@YAHOO.COM wrote:

> This is why I recommend painting into a thin coat of white or clear glaze and
> then glazing it again with a truly transparent compatible clear. It will
> solve you probem at any glaze compatible temperature that the velvets will
> survive to. I have found this works exceptionally well.

______________________________________________________________________________
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.

Elizabeth Priddy

www.angelfire.com/nc/clayworkshop
Beaufort, NC

---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.

Bobbruch1@AOL.COM on sun 29 jun 03


It is possible with Velvets to keep testing the adding of clear cone 6 glaze
until you reach the point where you are satisfied with the surface. Then,
there would be no reason to cover the velvets with a glaze. There is a newer
product by Amaco called majolica velvet underglaze, and most of the colors are
either glossy or respond well to an overlay of clear glaze. My experience in this
is with clears that I made up, so I don't know if you can add the store
bought variety to the velvets directly.

Bob Bruch

<<<<From: May Luk
Subject: Re: Amaco Velvet Underglaze at cone 6

Can you elaborate a bit on this technique? Do you mean painting the velvet
with a bit of base glaze before bisque?

I had just make some test tiles: mixing stain with a little bit of base
glaze and paint with the aid of water and glycerine (before going to bisque=
)
, because I have the same problem with some stains not being fully melted
with the top transparent glaze. Still experimenting.