search  current discussion  categories  glazes - cone 04-06 

afroamerican and low fire glazes (long)

updated tue 29 apr 03

 

Carl Finch on sun 27 apr 03


At 09:54 PM 4/27/03 -0400, Edouard Bastarache wrote:
>Hey Ingeborg,
>
>" I always felt Canadians to be a notch above Americans."
>
>Quebekers are !!! (Hehehehehe)

Well, certainly----latitudinally speaking, of course! ;-)

--Carl
near Medford, Oregon, USofA (N 42.27935=B0, W 122.93125=B0)

Earl Brunner on sun 27 apr 03


Shoot, look at any good map and you will find that MOST OF Canada is
above most of the U.S. .........

-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Edouard
Bastarache
Sent: Sunday, April 27, 2003 6:54 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Re: AfroAmerican and Low Fire glazes (long)

Hey Ingeborg,

" I always felt Canadians to be a notch above Americans."

Quebekers are !!! (Hehehehehe)

Marcia Selsor on sun 27 apr 03


Did you ever try vee gum for a brushing additive?
Marcia

Ingeborg Foco wrote:
> Seeing my post in print made it look not quite right. The feeling I meant
> to pass on was that African Americans are proud of the color of their skin
> and
> to not notice the difference would mean you are either blind or fibbing.
>
> How can you not notice someone's beautiful blue eyes, an Asian face with
> high cheek bones, the timeless faces of blacks - they seem to age so well;
> all of the differences that make us unique and interesting. That is not
> racist, it is a fact and to pretend differences do not exist is silly. I've
> traveled thru Africa and was very much aware that I looked very different
> and I was out of place.
> I think they noticed too!!!
>
> Enough about that, I think I should not get up
> and write a post so early in the morning. But I think the post annoyed me
> and to come from a Canadian at that tsk tsk. I always felt Canadians to be
> a notch above Americans. Another myth shot down!
>
> I finally finished my tile/mural project. It is installed and the
> inspector has put his sign of approval on the project. Many people on this
> list helped with advice both on and off list. The learning curve was steep
> and there are things that could be done better. I began to look at all of
> the problems with the results and was ready to throw it all in the trash and
> start all over again, never mind that I had a small fortune tied up and that
> it was all done. A friend came by and looked at it critically
> saying it is whimsical, colorful and tropical and art does not
> have to be perfect and you need to get going and do other work. I clearly
> needed to get going and do other things. I took her advice and installed
> it.
>
> The problems were directly related to the complexity of the design.
> Unfortunately, I did not give glazing a thought when I was in the design
> phase. The tile making was not an issue as I've made lots of tiles.
> However, to glaze with a brush so many different colors all butting up to
> each other or interlacing ---well it was really hard.
>
> Trying to brush three even coats (Impossible ) of glaze onto a bisque tile
> was quite a chore. It reminds me of sticking your tongue onto a frozen door
> handle. Kind of the same results "slurp!" I tried soaking the tile and
> that didn't work very well. Then I ran all over trying to find glycerin
> which was suggested in the archives and finally gave up and just struggled
> with brushing the glaze as best as I could and re firing and refiring and
> refiring some more. Glycerin seems to be something that each drug store has
> just recently discontinued. I was able to find one little bottle after
> trying 4 places but found it not to really improve the brushing quality.
>
> I ended up using Frit, Kaolin and Mason stain. Some of the stains brushed
> easier than others. For now it looks great. People see it from the road
> and it draws attention to the building. When they drive into the parking
> lot, they walk up to it and look and touch it. I plan on redoing it as time
> permits; now that I have done a dry run so to speak. A friend took some
> digital photos and it's too bad I don't have a web site where I could show
> you the results.
>
> At any rate, thanks to all of you for all of your help.
>
> Sincerely,
>
>
> Ingeborg
> the Potter's Workshop & Gallery
> P.O. Box 510
> 3058 Stringfellow Road
> St. James City, Florida 33956
>
> 239-283-2775
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>


--
Tuscany in 2003
http://home.attbi.com/~m.selsor/Tuscany2003.html

Ingeborg Foco on sun 27 apr 03


Seeing my post in print made it look not quite right. The feeling I meant
to pass on was that African Americans are proud of the color of their skin
and
to not notice the difference would mean you are either blind or fibbing.

How can you not notice someone's beautiful blue eyes, an Asian face with
high cheek bones, the timeless faces of blacks - they seem to age so well;
all of the differences that make us unique and interesting. That is not
racist, it is a fact and to pretend differences do not exist is silly. I've
traveled thru Africa and was very much aware that I looked very different
and I was out of place.
I think they noticed too!!!

Enough about that, I think I should not get up
and write a post so early in the morning. But I think the post annoyed me
and to come from a Canadian at that tsk tsk. I always felt Canadians to be
a notch above Americans. Another myth shot down!

I finally finished my tile/mural project. It is installed and the
inspector has put his sign of approval on the project. Many people on this
list helped with advice both on and off list. The learning curve was steep
and there are things that could be done better. I began to look at all of
the problems with the results and was ready to throw it all in the trash and
start all over again, never mind that I had a small fortune tied up and that
it was all done. A friend came by and looked at it critically
saying it is whimsical, colorful and tropical and art does not
have to be perfect and you need to get going and do other work. I clearly
needed to get going and do other things. I took her advice and installed
it.

The problems were directly related to the complexity of the design.
Unfortunately, I did not give glazing a thought when I was in the design
phase. The tile making was not an issue as I've made lots of tiles.
However, to glaze with a brush so many different colors all butting up to
each other or interlacing ---well it was really hard.

Trying to brush three even coats (Impossible ) of glaze onto a bisque tile
was quite a chore. It reminds me of sticking your tongue onto a frozen door
handle. Kind of the same results "slurp!" I tried soaking the tile and
that didn't work very well. Then I ran all over trying to find glycerin
which was suggested in the archives and finally gave up and just struggled
with brushing the glaze as best as I could and re firing and refiring and
refiring some more. Glycerin seems to be something that each drug store has
just recently discontinued. I was able to find one little bottle after
trying 4 places but found it not to really improve the brushing quality.

I ended up using Frit, Kaolin and Mason stain. Some of the stains brushed
easier than others. For now it looks great. People see it from the road
and it draws attention to the building. When they drive into the parking
lot, they walk up to it and look and touch it. I plan on redoing it as time
permits; now that I have done a dry run so to speak. A friend took some
digital photos and it's too bad I don't have a web site where I could show
you the results.

At any rate, thanks to all of you for all of your help.

Sincerely,


Ingeborg
the Potter's Workshop & Gallery
P.O. Box 510
3058 Stringfellow Road
St. James City, Florida 33956

239-283-2775

Edouard Bastarache on sun 27 apr 03


Hey Ingeborg,

" I always felt Canadians to be a notch above Americans."

Quebekers are !!! (Hehehehehe)


Later,



"Ils sont fous ces Quebecois"
Edouard Bastarache
Irreductible Quebecois
Indomitable Quebeker
Sorel-Tracy
Quebec
edouardb@sorel-tracy.qc.ca
http://sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm

Edouard Bastarache on mon 28 apr 03


Hehehehehe !!!


"Well, certainly----latitudinally speaking, of course! ;-)"

--Carl
near Medford, Oregon, USofA (N 42.27935, W 122.93125)

____________________________________________________________________________
__
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.