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as one mug to another

updated mon 1 jul 02

 

Janet Kaiser on thu 27 jun 02


Into one-upmanship here... Sold an Ida Michaeli mug for =A324 today. It
was the most expensive mug we have ever sold and considering the buyer
was unsure whether she should drink out of it or not (crackle glazed
inside and out) I think it may have been her most 'expensive' too.

Although we do not carry many, mugs here at The CoA are usually from
=A36 to =A315 no matter who makes them. I find there are certain
"psychological" limitations or barriers and most makers offer mugs, so
that people who really like their work, but cannot (or feel they
cannot) afford it, at least have a piece to cherish and the maker has
a sale. This lady would really have liked the teapot, but at =A370 that
was a little beyond what she wanted to spend today. Who knows? She may
be back... Although we will probably lose out on the mug deal
financially, because she paid by traveller's cheque and British banks
are pigs about charges.

In the meantime, I think that the price of a mug (or other drinking
vessel) is not a true indication of the pricing strategy of individual
potters. It works both ways though. Indeed, *relatively* speaking a
mug can cost a great deal more than their "real" work. Just as the
larger the work, the more clay one gets per pound, dollar or yen
spent. It is sometimes one of the most difficult factors to explain to
customers. Why is this bowl twice as big as that other one, but only
costs =A310 more? Is there some mistake? Well, no Sir... The potter
takes the same time to make a bowl, no matter what the size. The
material costs involved are not really what you are paying for...
"Time is money" and all that jazz.

Janet Kaiser - keeping out of the kitchen because I forgot to put the
smelly cheese into an air-tight container AND we had fish for dinner
tonight. What a pong! But too cold to leave the window open all
night...
The Chapel of Art / Capel Celfyddyd
Home of The International Potters' Path
8 Marine Crescent : Criccieth LL52 0EA : GB-Wales
Telephone: ++44 (0)1766-523570
URL: http://www.the-coa.org.uk
postbox@the-coa.org.uk

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Janet Kaiser on thu 27 jun 02


Into one-upmanship here... Sold an Ida Michaeli mug for 24 today. It
was the most expensive mug we have ever sold and considering the buyer
was unsure whether she should drink out of it or not (crackle glazed
inside and out) I think it may have been her most 'expensive' too.

Although we do not carry many, mugs here at The CoA are usually from
6 to 15 no matter who makes them. I find there are certain
"psychological" limitations or barriers and most makers offer mugs, so
that people who really like their work, but cannot (or feel they
cannot) afford it, at least have a piece to cherish and the maker has
a sale. This lady would really have liked the teapot, but at 70 that
was a little beyond what she wanted to spend today. Who knows? She may
be back... Although we will probably lose out on the mug deal
financially, because she paid by traveller's cheque and British banks
are pigs about charges.

In the meantime, I think that the price of a mug (or other drinking
vessel) is not a true indication of the pricing strategy of individual
potters. It works both ways though. Indeed, *relatively* speaking a
mug can cost a great deal more than their "real" work. Just as the
larger the work, the more clay one gets per pound, dollar or yen
spent. It is sometimes one of the most difficult factors to explain to
customers. Why is this bowl twice as big as that other one, but only
costs 10 more? Is there some mistake? Well, no Sir... The potter
takes the same time to make a bowl, no matter what the size. The
material costs involved are not really what you are paying for...
"Time is money" and all that jazz.

Janet Kaiser - keeping out of the kitchen because I forgot to put the
smelly cheese into an air-tight container AND we had fish for dinner
tonight. What a pong! But too cold to leave the window open all
night...
The Chapel of Art / Capel Celfyddyd
Home of The International Potters' Path
8 Marine Crescent : Criccieth LL52 0EA : GB-Wales
Telephone: ++44 (0)1766-523570
URL: http://www.the-coa.org.uk
postbox@the-coa.org.uk