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lips on mugs and drinking vessels

updated wed 10 apr 02

 

potterybydai on sun 7 apr 02


Janet said:
>The rim is OK, just there is no "flow control" and the last quarter >of the
contents always surges out. Even with my big mouth, I end >up with spills
and dribbles down my front!

I had to laugh at your description, Janet! Sort of like the ice cubes that
stick at the bottom of the glass, releasing at the last minute to douse you.
I make mugs that are comfortable to me, and I find that a very feminine
shape, with the main part of the "belly" low on the cylinder, curving up to
a not-too-narrow waist, then gently flaring out to a sensuous mouth works
really well.
Handles are, of course, a matter of personal preference, and I prefer
"question mark" shaped ones that are slightly squared off just past the top
of the curve---I find the slightly flattened curve easier to hold with my
thumb than a completely rounded one; three fingers inside the handle, enough
room so that your knuckles aren't touching the side of the hot mug. The
handle also needs to be placed at a level where the mug feels nicely
balanced when you pick it up. There really is a lot more to making a mug
than throwing a cylinder and slapping a handle on it, isn't there?
I know we had a thread about mugs/handles a while ago, and lots of
clayarters expressed a preference for handleless ones. I do like the feel
of holding the body of a nice mug in my hand, but am put off by it being too
hot if filled with a good scalding cup of tea. Ah, life is full of
challenges!
Dai in Kelowna, BC

potterybydai@shaw.ca

Life is 10% what happens to you, and 90% how you
respond to it.

Les Crimp on mon 8 apr 02


Dai -

Here I was always thinking that a mug is "guy" thing and you come along with
your sensuous, female, nicely rounded bottom up to a slim waist, stuff.

I am dropping the computer thing right now and going to the studio to throw
mugs. I have a whole new view.

Thanks,

Les on that Island in the Pacific.
lcrimp@shaw.ca

Tommy Humphries on mon 8 apr 02


Dai writes...

> > One mug I had that I found very awkward to drink from was barrel
> > shaped, with the rim curving slightly inward (_) - sort of this
> shape, only
> > not so pronounced.

Janet responds...

> If you add a slanted flange at 30=B0 or / shape to the top of that mug
> of yours as you have "drawn" here, Dai, it is the worst mug we own.

The reason that these shapes so not work well is that the shape is
deceptive. You perceive (without thinking) that a certain amount of flow
will occur with a specific movement of the wrist, but in reality more liq=
uid
flows (or less) than is expected...or in the case of Janet's mug, the
radical shape of the rim holds a bit of liquid even after the drinker
expects the flow to be over.

The shape of the mug should produce predictable results...The inward curv=
e
of the barrel mug produces a "water over the dam" effect that is hard to
control...I make mugs in that general shape, but the rim is not a
continuation of the curve of the wall, instead, the rim begins almost at =
the
widest point of the pot, and finishes mostly vertical.

In my opinion the most comfortable and dribble resistant mugs are a
consistent and continual flair shape from the bottom to the top...the flo=
w
mimics what the mind sees, so there are no awkward moments where you are
confronted with more coffee than you ordered.

Tommy

Janet Kaiser on mon 8 apr 02


> One mug I had that I found very awkward to drink from was barrel
> shaped, with the rim curving slightly inward (_) - sort of this
shape, only
> not so pronounced.

If you add a slanted flange at 30 or / shape to the top of that mug
of yours as you have "drawn" here, Dai, it is the worst mug we own.
The rim is OK, just there is no "flow control" and the last quarter of
the contents always surges out. Even with my big mouth, I end up with
spills and dribbles down my front!

It is a really bad design. OK for a jug, but dreadful for a mug.

Janet Kaiser
The Chapel of Art / Capel Celfyddyd
Home of The International Potters' Path
8 Marine Crescent : Criccieth : GB-Wales
URL: http://www.the-coa.org.uk
postbox@the-coa.org.uk

Janet Kaiser on tue 9 apr 02


Yes, that is right, Tommy. I would go on to say, that if you can lay
a mug on one side and it holds/retains liquid in the bulbous bottom
part (_), it is going to be especially "unpredictable".

I didn't mention that the maker of No.1 Bad Mug, airily replied, "Oh,
yes, some people have mentioned they have difficulty drinking from
them, but I don't any more". The expectation being users will get used
to a new "drinking technique". As we use countless mugs in a day (pint
of tea each per hour) it is one mug I never use, because how can I
accustom myself to a new technique, if it is only one out of many?

Janet Kaiser
The Chapel of Art / Capel Celfyddyd
Home of The International Potters' Path
8 Marine Crescent : Criccieth : GB-Wales
URL: http://www.the-coa.org.uk
postbox@the-coa.org.uk

----- Original Message -----
The reason that these shapes so not work well is that the shape is
deceptive. You perceive (without thinking) that a certain amount of
flow will occur with a specific movement of the wrist, but in reality
more liquid flows (or less) than is expected...or in the case of
Janet's mug, the radical shape of the rim holds a bit of liquid even
after the drinker expects the flow to be over.