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tool for glazing those big plates

updated tue 4 sep 01

 

Anji Henderson on wed 15 aug 01


Mattos on Guide drive in Rockville they must have them
.. They may have closer locations too.. Or if for
some odd reason they dont have them poke at Banner
glass... But I would put money on a bet that Mattos
has them ...

And for yall not in this area, any professional auto
paint supplier or glass dealer should have them ..

Anji


--- Veena Raghavan <75124.2520@COMPUSERVE.COM> wrote:
> Martin,
> You are cruel! Now, those of us who make
> large platters want one of
> these suction cups and cannot get them. Ouch! That
> hurts!
> Lucky you!
> Now, if someone could tell us where to get
> such a tool in the
> U.S..........
>
> All the best.
>
> Veena
>
> Message text written Martin Howard
> >
> It is a suction cup, heavy duty, made by Am-Tech.
> Sorry, I have no address
> or telephone number for them, but assume they are in
> the UK somewhere.
> It is sold for work on car panels and carrying
> windows, doors, mirrors etc.

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Veena Raghavan on wed 15 aug 01


Martin, =

You are cruel! Now, those of us who make large platters want one =
of
these suction cups and cannot get them. Ouch! That hurts!
Lucky you!
Now, if someone could tell us where to get such a tool in the
U.S..........

All the best.

Veena

Message text written Martin Howard
>
It is a suction cup, heavy duty, made by Am-Tech. Sorry, I have no addres=
s
or telephone number for them, but assume they are in the UK somewhere.
It is sold for work on car panels and carrying windows, doors, mirrors et=
c.
But it works on my large plates.
Just make sure the surface is flat;
put the Suction Cup on it;
tighten and clip the two handles together and place the ware in the glaze=

bucket;
take it out and place ware on stilts;
release the handles and move to the next plate.
Look! no finger marks!
Only cost me =A32.<



Veena Raghavan
75124.2520@compuserve.com

Philip Poburka on thu 16 aug 01


Dear Veena!

Any Commercial Glazier, or Glass Installers can tell you where from to bu=
y
one...they all use them.

I should be surprised if this would work on bisque, as the vacuum is
predicated on the non-porous nature of Glass...

Philip
Las Vegas...

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shirley Tschannen"
To:
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2001 12:58 PM
Subject: Re: Tool for glazing those big plates


> Hi Veena, I don't want one of these things but I bet if you call arou=
nd
the
> various plate glass installers they will be glad to tell where they get
> theirs.....good luck....
>
> Veena Raghavan wrote:
>
> > Martin,
> > You are cruel! Now, those of us who make large platters want =
one
of
> > these suction cups and cannot get them. Ouch! That hurts!
> > Lucky you!
> > Now, if someone could tell us where to get such a tool in the
> > U.S..........
> >
> > All the best.
> >
> > Veena
> >
> > Message text written Martin Howard
> > >
> > It is a suction cup, heavy duty, made by Am-Tech. Sorry, I have no
address
> > or telephone number for them, but assume they are in the UK somewhere.
> > It is sold for work on car panels and carrying windows, doors, mirror=
s
etc.
> > But it works on my large plates.
> > Just make sure the surface is flat;
> > put the Suction Cup on it;
> > tighten and clip the two handles together and place the ware in the
glaze
> > bucket;
> > take it out and place ware on stilts;
> > release the handles and move to the next plate.
> > Look! no finger marks!
> > Only cost me =A32.<
> >
> > Veena Raghavan
> > 75124.2520@compuserve.com
> >
> >
_________________________________________________________________________=
___
__
> > Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
> >
> > You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> > settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
> >
> > Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@p=
cli
nk.com.
>
>
_________________________________________________________________________=
___
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

billie schwab on thu 16 aug 01


LOL............I just did a search using Google for "glass suction lifter"
and came up with a whole list of suppliers in the US. Had to laugh at one of
the products called a "stump sucker" :-) somehow the visual is a bit much at
2am.

I'm going to bed. Maybe I'll wake my husband up to tell him about the stump
sucker............. LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL


>
>Martin,
> You are cruel! Now, those of us who make large platters want one
>of
>these suction cups and cannot get them. Ouch! That hurts!
> Lucky you!
> Now, if someone could tell us where to get such a tool in the
>U.S..........
>
>All the best.
>
>Veena
>


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Shirley Tschannen on thu 16 aug 01


Hi Veena, I don't want one of these things but I bet if you call around the
various plate glass installers they will be glad to tell where they get
theirs.....good luck....

Veena Raghavan wrote:

> Martin,
> You are cruel! Now, those of us who make large platters want one of
> these suction cups and cannot get them. Ouch! That hurts!
> Lucky you!
> Now, if someone could tell us where to get such a tool in the
> U.S..........
>
> All the best.
>
> Veena
>
> Message text written Martin Howard
> >
> It is a suction cup, heavy duty, made by Am-Tech. Sorry, I have no address
> or telephone number for them, but assume they are in the UK somewhere.
> It is sold for work on car panels and carrying windows, doors, mirrors etc.
> But it works on my large plates.
> Just make sure the surface is flat;
> put the Suction Cup on it;
> tighten and clip the two handles together and place the ware in the glaze
> bucket;
> take it out and place ware on stilts;
> release the handles and move to the next plate.
> Look! no finger marks!
> Only cost me 2.<
>
> Veena Raghavan
> 75124.2520@compuserve.com
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.

Clifford Ross on thu 16 aug 01


HARBOR FREIGHT.COM suction cup-item#38303-oasa $ 4.99 Cliff in Myrtle
beach>and came up with a whole list of suppliers in the US. Had to laugh at
one of
>the products called a "stump sucker" :-) somehow the visual is a bit much at
>2am.
>
>I'm going to bed. Maybe I'll wake my husband up to tell him about the stump
>sucker............. LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL
>
>
>>
>>Martin,
>> You are cruel! Now, those of us who make large platters want one
>>of
>>these suction cups and cannot get them. Ouch! That hurts!
>> Lucky you!
>> Now, if someone could tell us where to get such a tool in the
>>U.S..........
>>
>>All the best.
>>
>>Veena
>>
>
>
>_________________________________________________________________
>Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
>
>___________________________________________________________________________
___
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.
>
>

John Hesselberth on thu 16 aug 01


on 8/15/01 5:27 PM, Veena Raghavan at 75124.2520@COMPUSERVE.COM wrote:

> You are cruel! Now, those of us who make large platters want one of
> these suction cups and cannot get them. Ouch! That hurts!
> Lucky you!
> Now, if someone could tell us where to get such a tool in the
> U.S..........
Hi Veena,

They are sold in nearly any auto supply store

Regards, John
Web site: http://www.frogpondpottery.com Email: john@frogpondpottery.com

"The life so short, the craft so long to learn." Chaucer's translation of
Hippocrates, 5th cent. B.C.

vince pitelka on fri 17 aug 01


There seems to be some misinformation flying around concerning what will
work in this situation. The rubber suction cups used for lifting large
sheets of glass or for pulling out dents in car bodies will not work for
lifting bisque ware. Those suction devices only work on a very smooth
non-porous surface. In order to work on bisqueware you would need a large
rubber suction cup connected to a continuous vacuum pump, which would
maintain suction despite the porous nature of the bisque-fired clay. This
would be a different animal altogether. For smaller plates you could
probably just improvise a suction cup attached to a good vacuum cleaner.
But for larger plates, you will probably need a more powerful vacuum pump.
Good luck -
- Vince

Vince Pitelka
Appalachian Center for Crafts
Tennessee Technological University
1560 Craft Center Drive, Smithville TN 37166
Home - vpitelka@dtccom.net
615/597-5376
Work - wpitelka@tntech.edu
615/597-6801 ext. 111, fax 615/597-6803
http://www.craftcenter.tntech.edu/

Russel Fouts on fri 17 aug 01


Veena,

http://www.anver.com

Look under "hand Cups"

And Martin, they've got some really powerful suction lifters for REALLY
BIG Plates too! ;-)

Ru

--

Russel Fouts
Mes Potes & Mes Pots
Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 223 02 75
Mobile: +32 476 55 38 75
Http://www.mypots.com
http://www.Japan-Net.ne.jp/~iwcat

"There is a theory which states that
if ever anyone discovers exactly what
the universe is for and why it's here,
it will instantly disappear and be
replaced by something even more bizzarly
inexplicable."

"There is another theory which states
that this has already happened!"

Douglas Adams' The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy

james w. thomas on sat 18 aug 01



Vince the suction cup will stick to bisque ware if the plate bottoms are covered well with wax and if the suction cup is dipped in water. This should form an adequate seal.


Sorry to hear of your loss Mel, my prayers are with you.


JWT 42 yr. old newbie.



>From: vince pitelka
>Reply-To: Ceramic Arts Discussion List
>To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>Subject: Re: Tool for glazing those big plates
>Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 23:33:45 -0500
>
>There seems to be some misinformation flying around concerning what will
>work in this situation. The rubber suction cups used for lifting large
>sheets of glass or for pulling out dents in car bodies will not work for
>lifting bisque ware. Those suction devices only work on a very smooth
>non-porous surface. In order to work on bisqueware you would need a large
>rubber suction cup connected to a continuous vacuum pump, which would
>maintain suction despite the porous nature of the bisque-fired clay. This
>would be a different animal altogether. For smaller plates you could
>probably just improvise a suction cup attached to a good vacuum cleaner.
>But for larger plates, you will probably need a more powerful vacuum pump.
>Good luck -
>- Vince
>
>Vince Pitelka
>Appalachian Center for Crafts
>Tennessee Technological University
>1560 Craft Center Drive, Smithville TN 37166
>Home - vpitelka@dtccom.net
>615/597-5376
>Work - wpitelka@tntech.edu
>615/597-6801 ext. 111, fax 615/597-6803
>http://www.craftcenter.tntech.edu/
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.


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Steve Mills on sun 19 aug 01


The tools that I have always used for glazing platters are 3 hooks that
fit onto my first 2 fingers and thumb; I make them out of fencing wire,
they comprise 3 or 4 coils that the finger/thumb fits into, then they
extend about 3 inches outwards ending in an 80 degree downturn about
half an inch long. They enable me to pick up the plate one-handed,
submerge it in the glaze, and put it down on a board, in one simple
movement. The foot ring can either be wiped clean, or, as I do; pre-
waxed. I make them in 2 sizes; one for 8 to 12 inch plates and a heavier
gauge set with longer arms for big 'uns!

Steve

--
Steve Mills
Bath
UK

Christena Schafale on mon 20 aug 01


On the other hand, Martin seems to be telling us that it does work for
him. I wonder if it works because the bottom of the plate, where the
suction cup is placed, is waxed, therefore not so porous anymore.

Chris

At 11:33 PM 8/17/01 -0500, you wrote:
>There seems to be some misinformation flying around concerning what will
>work in this situation. The rubber suction cups used for lifting large
>sheets of glass or for pulling out dents in car bodies will not work for
>lifting bisque ware. Those suction devices only work on a very smooth
>non-porous surface. In order to work on bisqueware you would need a large
>rubber suction cup connected to a continuous vacuum pump, which would
>maintain suction despite the porous nature of the bisque-fired clay. This
>would be a different animal altogether. For smaller plates you could
>probably just improvise a suction cup attached to a good vacuum cleaner.
>But for larger plates, you will probably need a more powerful vacuum pump.
>Good luck -
>- Vince
>
>Vince Pitelka
>Appalachian Center for Crafts
>Tennessee Technological University
>1560 Craft Center Drive, Smithville TN 37166
>Home - vpitelka@dtccom.net
>615/597-5376
>Work - wpitelka@tntech.edu
>615/597-6801 ext. 111, fax 615/597-6803
>http://www.craftcenter.tntech.edu/
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
>melpots@pclink.com.

Consultation and Referral Specialist
Resources for Seniors
christenas@rfsnc.org
www.resourcesforseniors.com
Phone: (919) 713-1537
FAX: (919) 872-9574
1110 Navaho Dr, Suite 400
Raleigh, NC 27609

Gayle Bair on mon 20 aug 01


Steve,
Is the plate upside down, right side up or vertical? How do you get the
glaze out of a concave plate?
This dummy needs to know!


Gayle Bair
Bainbridge Island, WA
http://claybair.com


Steve wrote>>
The tools that I have always used for glazing platters are 3 hooks that
fit onto my first 2 fingers and thumb; I make them out of fencing wire,
they comprise 3 or 4 coils that the finger/thumb fits into, then they
extend about 3 inches outwards ending in an 80 degree downturn about
half an inch long. They enable me to pick up the plate one-handed,
submerge it in the glaze, and put it down on a board, in one simple
movement. The foot ring can either be wiped clean, or, as I do; pre-
waxed. I make them in 2 sizes; one for 8 to 12 inch plates and a heavier
gauge set with longer arms for big 'uns!

Steve

--
Steve Mills
Bath
UK

Martin Howard on mon 20 aug 01


It works for me on slipped and bisque fired 10 and half inch plates.
I can hold either the flat slipped and fired inside or the flat bottom with
the Suction Cup.
That is possibly because I compress both sides very substantially when
throwing.
The inside is compressed by use of a piece of plate metal, the longer side
equal to the interior diameter of the plates, (it is used for finishing
surfaces by cabinet makers); the bottom is compressed with the wooden
Potter's Thumb during turning.

Incidentally, I use an earlier twice fired plate of the same size as those
needed as a chuck. The reduction in size is just right for the leather hard
plate to sit over the fired one on the wheelhead.

I agree that if my clay was porous, grogged, or not compressed, then there
would be a problem in making the suction cup adhere to the ware.

My clay is Valentines Standard Red Earthenware. It is very fine grained in
itself to start with and polishes beautifully, as well as accepting slips
and glazes easily. Other coarser clays would not IMHO work with the Suction
Cup.

But like many pottery tools, I may well find that "fingers are best", and
leave the tool in the cupboard to gather dust with so many others :-)

Martin Howard
Webb's Cottage Pottery
Woolpits Road, Great Saling
BRAINTREE, Essex CM7 5DZ
England

martin@webbscottage.co.uk
http://www.webbscottage.co.uk

Steve Mills on tue 21 aug 01


Dear Gayle, you're NOT a dummy

The Plate is right side up: I use an old large enamel bowl ( disused
baby bath would do) and glaze in an arc, so the plate goes in one side
of the bowl and comes out the other, is held (almost) vertical for a few
seconds and then put down. The spots where the wire hooks touch are
touched in by glaze running back down the wire. The process (with
practice) is quite quick.

Steve
Bath
UK


In message , Gayle Bair writes
>Steve,
>Is the plate upside down, right side up or vertical? How do you get the
>glaze out of a concave plate?
>This dummy needs to know!
>
>
>Gayle Bair
>Bainbridge Island, WA
>http://claybair.com
>
>
>Steve wrote>>
>The tools that I have always used for glazing platters are 3 hooks that
>fit onto my first 2 fingers and thumb; I make them out of fencing wire,
>they comprise 3 or 4 coils that the finger/thumb fits into, then they
>extend about 3 inches outwards ending in an 80 degree downturn about
>half an inch long. They enable me to pick up the plate one-handed,
>submerge it in the glaze, and put it down on a board, in one simple
>movement. The foot ring can either be wiped clean, or, as I do; pre-
>waxed. I make them in 2 sizes; one for 8 to 12 inch plates and a heavier
>gauge set with longer arms for big 'uns!
>
>Steve
>
>--
>Steve Mills
>Bath
>UK

--
Steve Mills
Bath
UK

Russel Fouts on tue 21 aug 01


Chris,

>> On the other hand, Martin seems to be telling us that it does work for him. I wonder if it works because the bottom of the plate, where the suction cup is placed, is waxed, therefore not so porous anymore. <<

It works because he's Martin and can make all kinds of wierd and
wonderful things work.

Cat litter terra-sig, aluminum foil alumina, what concepts!! ;-)

Russel
--

Russel Fouts
Mes Potes & Mes Pots
Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 223 02 75
Mobile: +32 476 55 38 75
Http://www.mypots.com
http://www.Japan-Net.ne.jp/~iwcat

"There is a theory which states that
if ever anyone discovers exactly what
the universe is for and why it's here,
it will instantly disappear and be
replaced by something even more bizzarly
inexplicable."

"There is another theory which states
that this has already happened!"

Douglas Adams' The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Martin Howard on wed 22 aug 01


wonderful things work.>

Hold on there Russel. You'll have all those Yanks coming over to Stansted
and queuing at our door. You know what gluttons they are for anything
weird!!

Actually, I just try to be logical with the materials and tools that come my
way. But logic seems to be the subject lacking in most peoples' education:-)

Martin Howard
Webb's Cottage Pottery
Woolpits Road, Great Saling
BRAINTREE, Essex CM7 5DZ
England

martin@webbscottage.co.uk
http://www.webbscottage.co.uk

Russel Fouts on fri 24 aug 01


Martin,

>> Hold on there Russel. You'll have all those Yanks coming over to Stansted and queuing at our door. You know what gluttons they are for anything weird!! Actually, I just try to be logical with the materials and tools that come my way. But logic seems to be the subject lacking in most peoples' education:-) <<

Yeah, but when that is coupled with imagination and lateral thinking,
look out!

Russel

--

Russel Fouts
Mes Potes & Mes Pots
Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 223 02 75
Mobile: +32 476 55 38 75
Http://www.mypots.com
http://www.Japan-Net.ne.jp/~iwcat

"There is a theory which states that
if ever anyone discovers exactly what
the universe is for and why it's here,
it will instantly disappear and be
replaced by something even more bizzarly
inexplicable."

"There is another theory which states
that this has already happened!"

Douglas Adams' The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Martin Howard on mon 3 sep 01


I tried using my new tool for holding large plates on bisqued ware.
The tool holds the plates fine.
They dip into the glaze without dropping off.
But then the added suction of the glaze destroys the suction force.
All of them fell into the glaze bucket and had to be washed off and glazed
in a more normal fashion.

Theory counts for nothing without the practical testing.

I now have three of these tools, which I can use on surfaces already once
glazed.

Maybe I will become a glazier instead, or mend those dents in the car!!

Martin Howard
Webb's Cottage Pottery
Woolpits Road, Great Saling
BRAINTREE, Essex CM7 5DZ
England

martin@webbscottage.co.uk
http://www.webbscottage.co.uk