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big platters

updated fri 2 mar 07

 

mel jacobson on fri 1 dec 00


just a small addition to vince and dannon.

when making any large pot, i usually put a small drill hole
in the ring foot. when the pot is sitting on its ring and drying
the hole allows air to move from under the pot. this also helps
during firing, but best of all, you can put a wire in the hole
and the plate can be hung on a wall. customers love this.

i have 18 large platters in the kiln firing as i write this. bisque
fired them all on their rims. slow, slow, slow...all day
in fact.

i have learned from ron roy a very vital lesson: bisque firing
over a long period of time will give you perfect pots to add
glaze to. and, i do not try and get every pot in the western
world into every firing. give them space. the larger the pot,
the more you have to fuss over it...(turn it, flip it, keep it out of
drafts, rotate it a quarter turn every few hours.) being in your
studio all day, all week, every day is the only thing that makes
professional potters just that....professional, the hardest thing
on pots is when you only take care of them a couple days a week.

i have been in vince's studio. he does very large pots, very.
they are very complex pots, many small parts, very large. he
watches them like a hawk. never rushes anything. great care
is given to each pot. professional time is given everything.
his understanding of his pots is the same as his understanding
of his tools. care, concern, understanding of the process, with
nothing left to chance....sounds professional.
i just call him vince. he likes that best.
love of craftsmanship, what a concept. something worth working
towards....every day.
mel


FROM MINNETONKA, MINNESOTA, USA
http://www.pclink.com/melpots (website)

Lorri on sat 2 dec 00


> i have 18 large platters in the kiln firing as i write this. bisque
> fired them all on their rims. slow, slow, slow...all day
> in fact.

Wanting to make sure I understand this correctly as I am just beginning to
embark on throwing platters. Finally am getting the "bowl" idea with at
last, no S cracks most of the time. So when you say "fire them all on their
rims", does that mean sideways on the kiln with a portion of the rim on the
kiln shelf or upside down with the rim totally on the kiln shelf? Pardon
the ignorant question but the description leaves me uncertain.

Thanks in advance,
Lorri

Ron Roy on sun 3 dec 00


Just a small addition to my previous post on dunting - if you have a lot of
pots in a firing it stands to reason that the whole load will cool slower -
and more evenly - so in that respect it would help avoid dunting - it can
lead to the other problem of not getting all the carbon out of the clay -
which can lead to black corong and blistering.

I do advocate slow firing of bisque and glazes. How slow is slow? I say
100C per hour but there are situations where it could be faster - and there
are certainly situations where you have to go slower.

RR


>i have learned from ron roy a very vital lesson: bisque firing
>over a long period of time will give you perfect pots to add
>glaze to. and, i do not try and get every pot in the western
>world into every firing. give them space. the larger the pot,
>the more you have to fuss over it...(turn it, flip it, keep it out of
>drafts, rotate it a quarter turn every few hours.) being in your
>studio all day, all week, every day is the only thing that makes
>professional potters just that....professional, the hardest thing
>on pots is when you only take care of them a couple days a week.

Ron Roy
93 Pegasus Trail
Scarborough
Ontario, Canada
M1G 3N8
Evenings 416-439-2621
Fax 416-438-7849

Lynn Goodman Porcelain Pottery on wed 16 aug 06


On Aug 16, 2006, at 9:08 PM, darrell calhoun wrote:

> I just finished making a lot of 18" plaster bats and preparing to
> start throwing large platters. Is there anyone with suggestions on
> thickness, trimming techniques, etc. Also, I have a local distributor
> here that supplies Standard and Highwater Clays if anyone can suggest
> a good clay for these larger pieces.

What cone are you firing to? If ^6, I use Standard #551 porcelain.
Really white, really tight, translucent. Throws like a dream.

As to the throwing/trimming details: I throw thinner than usual
because, unlike virtually everything else I make, I don't trim a foot
into big platters. I have been unable, no matter what clay I've used,
to stop the platter from sagging during the glaze firing. What I do is,
I trim thinly straight across and leave it unglazed. I also trim
considerably stiffer than usual, to stop it from moving while being
trimmed. (If anyone out there has a fix for sagging platters, please
tell me!) After years of scraping glaze off kiln shelves, I can live
with it!

Lynn


Lynn Goodman
Fine Porcelain Pottery
548 Court St.
Brooklyn, NY 11231
718-858-6920
Cell 347-526-9805
www.lynngoodmanporcelain.com

darrell calhoun on wed 16 aug 06


I just finished making a lot of 18" plaster bats and preparing to start throwing large platters. Is there anyone with suggestions on thickness, trimming techniques, etc. Also, I have a local distributor here that supplies Standard and Highwater Clays if anyone can suggest a good clay for these larger pieces. Thanks for any help you can provide.

---------------------------------
How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messengerís low PC-to-Phone call rates.

Hank Murrow on thu 17 aug 06


On Aug 17, 2006, at 5:20 PM, Donald G. Goldsobel wrote:

> When trimming large platters, I also use circles of upholsterer's foam
> to
> support the platter so the pressure of trimming doesn't cause the clay
> to
> sag. As to sagging during firing---cut a small foot ring in the middle
> of
> the platter to support the center. I have seen several concentric ring
> is
> very large platters.

Dear Donald;

You have arrived at the very solution I did for plates and platters. My
Ringbat system consists of several concentric rings of very stiff foam
(cut on a computer driven machine) which friction fit to a small fixed
foam 'post' which is glued to the 16" bat. One just removes the rings
which are too wide to arrive at a solid platform for supporting the
ware. Additionally, the outer rings can be fixed to a bat with clay
wads for holding teapots, pitchers, and other forms softly and without
damage. I can send you a .pdf file if you like.

For firing support, I place an Avery label in the middle of the plate
to resist the glaze, peeling it off as I wipe the waxed foot, leaving a
bare spot to place a small waddy which keeps the bottom from 'kissing'
the shelf. Glazing the bottom often nicely accentuates the wirecut
pattern.

Cheers, Hank
www.murrow.biz/hank

William & Susan Schran User on thu 17 aug 06


On 8/16/06 9:08 PM, "darrell calhoun" wrote:

> I just finished making a lot of 18" plaster bats and preparing to start
> throwing large platters. Is there anyone with suggestions on thickness,
> trimming techniques, etc. Also, I have a local distributor here that supplies
> Standard and Highwater Clays if anyone can suggest a good clay for these
> larger pieces.

Most folks working on plaster bats don't wire cut the work after throwing,
but let the plaster draw the moisture from the clay until the pot & bat
separate. I always did the wire cut anyway, but give a try both methods.

When I remove the platter and get ready to flip it upside down, I lay a few
strips of newspaper (torn about 2" wide) across the top of the form, hanging
off the edges. I then lay a large board or bat across the top. I pick up the
top board/bat and the bottom bat, with platter sandwiched between, and flip
them over all at once. After removing the bottom (now top) bat, I can pick
up the platter by the ends of the newspaper strips and move the platter
without damaging the edges.

Your aim is as even a thickness throughout the entire cross section.
Usually the foot ring is located at about the junction of base & wall (such
that it is). Some folks cut a smaller interior foot ring to help support the
middle of the platter during firing to prevent the wide horizontal expanse
from sinking down.

Cutting some pieces of foam, that would fit inside the platter, of different
thicknesses, that you would place under the inside to support the clay while
trimming is helpful to keep the clay from being pushed down.

I find drying the platter slowly, upside down, sitting on sheets of
newspaper to allow for movement while drying works best for me. Keep the
edges covered with plastic, allowing to dry from the middle out seems to
help stop potential stresses from drying.

Hope this helps,

-- William "Bill" Schran
Fredericksburg, Virginia
wschran@cox.net
wschran@nvcc.edu

Marek & Pauline Drzazga-Donaldson on thu 17 aug 06


Dear Darrell,
A good clay is one that you get on with - how long is a piece of string? =
I use a terracotta clay mixed with a buff with the addition of about 20% =
kiln dried sand. I throw using very soft clay. Go to my Keramix site and =
see a video of throwing a large plate. I use 80lbs of clay, base about =
1" thick rim about 1/2". I trimmed (shown on the DVD available from the =
no9 site in two weeks time) by hand and carved a fluted pattern =
underneath.
Thickness is dependent on what use it will have, but I would suggest the =
addition of grog to most bodies when throwing large, anything up to 35%. =
Have fun and relax when throwing.

Happy potting Marek



Hand made Architectural Ceramics from No9 Studio UK www.no9uk.com
Fully Residential Pottery Courses and more at Mole Cottage =
www.moleys.com
"Tips and Time Travel from a Vernacular Potter" reviews on =
www.keramix.com
an irreverant point of view after 35 years in the game by Marek =
Drzazga-Donaldson=20
Free Works and Mole Cottage DVD's and and Video content on all the sites

Victoria E. Hamilton on thu 17 aug 06


80 lbs? Really?

Vicki Hamilton
Millennia Antica Pottery
Seattle, WA

-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Marek & Pauline
Drzazga-Donaldson
Sent: Wednesday, August 16, 2006 23:23
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Big Platters

Dear Darrell,
A good clay is one that you get on with - how long is a piece of string? I
use a terracotta clay mixed with a buff with the addition of about 20% kiln
dried sand. I throw using very soft clay. Go to my Keramix site and see a
video of throwing a large plate. I use 80lbs of clay, base about 1" thick
rim about 1/2". I trimmed (shown on the DVD available from the no9 site in
two weeks time) by hand and carved a fluted pattern underneath.
Thickness is dependent on what use it will have, but I would suggest the
addition of grog to most bodies when throwing large, anything up to 35%.
Have fun and relax when throwing.

Happy potting Marek



Hand made Architectural Ceramics from No9 Studio UK www.no9uk.com Fully
Residential Pottery Courses and more at Mole Cottage www.moleys.com "Tips
and Time Travel from a Vernacular Potter" reviews on www.keramix.com an
irreverant point of view after 35 years in the game by Marek
Drzazga-Donaldson Free Works and Mole Cottage DVD's and and Video content
on all the sites

____________________________________________________________________________
__
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

David Beumee on thu 17 aug 06


Dear Lynn,
The particular porcelain that I use, P-60-S from Mile Hi in Denver, exhibits considerable compression from the rim inward as it is being glaze fired, enough to make plates and platters into spinners. To get the finished look that porcelain deserves, I trim feet into my plates and platters, occasionally including feet that are deep enough to cut a groove into to attatch a wire for hanging after the glaze firing. My kiln wash is 4 parts alumina to 1 part clay, and I also use this for all types of wadding, which is the same mixture made up with just enough water so it can be formed into balls. I place a dime sized ball of the mixture on the bottom center of the plate or platter before the glaze firing and tap it out to a flat disc, about the size of a quarter, and this wadding holds the plate from sagging and hitting the shelf at cone 10, a wonderful trick learned from Katherine Hiersoux.

David Beumee
Porcelain by David Beumee
Lafayette, CO
www.davidbeumee.com










-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Lynn Goodman Porcelain Pottery
> On Aug 16, 2006, at 9:08 PM, darrell calhoun wrote:
>
> > I just finished making a lot of 18" plaster bats and preparing to
> > start throwing large platters. Is there anyone with suggestions on
> > thickness, trimming techniques, etc. Also, I have a local distributor
> > here that supplies Standard and Highwater Clays if anyone can suggest
> > a good clay for these larger pieces.
>
> What cone are you firing to? If ^6, I use Standard #551 porcelain.
> Really white, really tight, translucent. Throws like a dream.
>
> As to the throwing/trimming details: I throw thinner than usual
> because, unlike virtually everything else I make, I don't trim a foot
> into big platters. I have been unable, no matter what clay I've used,
> to stop the platter from sagging during the glaze firing. What I do is,
> I trim thinly straight across and leave it unglazed. I also trim
> considerably stiffer than usual, to stop it from moving while being
> trimmed. (If anyone out there has a fix for sagging platters, please
> tell me!) After years of scraping glaze off kiln shelves, I can live
> with it!
>
> Lynn
>
>
> Lynn Goodman
> Fine Porcelain Pottery
> 548 Court St.
> Brooklyn, NY 11231
> 718-858-6920
> Cell 347-526-9805
> www.lynngoodmanporcelain.com
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.

Donald G. Goldsobel on thu 17 aug 06


When trimming large platters, I also use circles of upholsterer's foam to
support the platter so the pressure of trimming doesn't cause the clay to
sag. As to sagging during firing---cut a small foot ring in the middle of
the platter to support the center. I have seen several concentric ring is
very large platters.

Donald

Bonnie Staffel on fri 18 aug 06


Hi Clayarters,

Highwater's Phoenix works very well for me for making large platters. I
have used that clay for over 20 years. My platters are formed on oiled
Masonite bats which absorb moisture but slowly so wiring off is not
necessary. I also brush water based wax on the rim to retard drying and
warpage.

My Coil and Slab method easily makes large platters. If I want to trim =
a
foot ring on the platter, I just use a thicker slab, support the center =
with
foam as well while trimming. =20

Regards,

Bonnie Staffel

http://webpages.charter.net/bstaffel/
http://vasefinder.com/bstaffelgallery1.html
DVD Throwing with Coils and Slabs
DVD Beginning Processes
Charter Member Potters Council

Marek & Pauline Drzazga-Donaldson on fri 18 aug 06


Dear Vicki Hamilton,

80lbs? Really?

actually I lie, it is not 80lbs - but 81lbs. As I use the number nine in =
most of my designs, so I weigh out my clay with 9 involved, for =
example 4.5 lbs, 27, 31.5, 54lbs - which is my average for Chimney Pot =
Barrel parts and up to 135lbs - anything over that weght I find that =
dividing the part I need to throw is the better option, as there comes a =
point where more weight of clay does not actually make for a better =
piece, also even though I could throw larger I have a width restriction =
of 40" in my kiln.=20

If you wait for a week or two there will be more on the platter (turning =
and glazing etc) on the no9 web site, along with finials, chimney pots, =
fountains etc.

Happy potting Marek


Hand made Architectural Ceramics from No9 Studio UK www.no9uk.com
Fully Residential Pottery Courses and more at Mole Cottage =
www.moleys.com
"Tips and Time Travel frm a Vernacular Potter" reviews on =
www.keramix.com
an irreverent point of view after 35 years in the game by Marek =
Drzazga-Donaldson=20
Free Works and Mole Cottage DVD's and Video content on all the sit

Hank Murrow on thu 1 mar 07


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On Aug 17, 2006, at 5:20 PM, Donald G. Goldsobel wrote:

> When trimming large platters, I also use circles of upholsterer's foam
> to
> support the platter so the pressure of trimming doesn't cause the clay
> to
> sag. As to sagging during firing---cut a small foot ring in the middle
> of
> the platter to support the center. I have seen several concentric ring
> is
> very large platters.

Dear Donald;

Great Minds think alike!


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Cheers, Hank
www.murrow.biz/hank

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