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ash glaze research

updated sat 20 mar 04

 

Martin Howard on fri 29 sep 00


Carol, I recently had an analysis done of willow ash, burned in my wood
burning stove in the pottery. The analysis was carried out by CERAM, Queens
Road, Penkhull, Stoke on Trent, ST 7LQ, England. info@ceram.co.uk
http://www.ceram.co.uk
XRF Semiquantitative analysis
Silica 6.4
Titania .2
Alumina 1.9
Ferric Oxide 2.2
Lime 52
Magnesia 2.6
Potash w.w
Soda .1
Cupric Oxide .06
Manganic Oxide .06
Phosphorus Pentoxide 2.9
Sulphur trioxide .7
Strontia .2
Zinc Oxide .4
Zirconia .1
Loss on Ignition 27.90

Hope that helps your research.
I would love to have the findings on Mares Tail, Hippurus vulgaris or
Equisetum. It is reported to be the only herb with colloidal silica, so it
should be useful for healing the ends of nerves. It should also be useful as
another source of silica in glazes. I have a small supply snitched from
hedgerows, which I will eventually test in glazes.

Martin Howard
Webb's Cottage Pottery
Woolpits Road, Great Saling
BRAINTREE, Essex CM7 5DZ
England
martin@webbscottage.co.uk

philrogers pottery on fri 29 sep 00


Carol,

Could you email me your address off line?

Thanks,

Phil.

Phil and Lynne Rogers,
Lower Cefn Faes,
RHAYADER.
Powys. LD6 5LT.
Tel/fax. (44) 01597 810875.
philrogers@ntlworld.com

----- Original Message -----
From: Carol Metcalfe
To:
Sent: Friday, September 29, 2000 2:58 PM
Subject: ASH GLAZE RESEARCH


> Hi!
>
> Having done some research into the use of linseed straw ash glazes as an
> undergraduate, I have just started a postgraduate research project on the
> use of arable waste in ash glazes. At the moment I am starting with the
> straw from peas and beans but any glazes using 'non-wood' ashes are of
great
> interest to me. Does anyone have any information or comments they would
like
> to share?
>
> The complete results of my work and final thesis will eventually be
> published in some form or other.
>
> Carol
> _________________________________________________________________________
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Carol Metcalfe on fri 29 sep 00


Hi!

Having done some research into the use of linseed straw ash glazes as an
undergraduate, I have just started a postgraduate research project on the
use of arable waste in ash glazes. At the moment I am starting with the
straw from peas and beans but any glazes using 'non-wood' ashes are of great
interest to me. Does anyone have any information or comments they would like
to share?

The complete results of my work and final thesis will eventually be
published in some form or other.

Carol
_________________________________________________________________________
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Merrie Boerner on fri 29 sep 00


Carol wrote...."any glazes using 'non-wood' ashes are of great
interest to me. Does anyone have any information or comments they would like
to share?"
In my small Mississippi town, there is a place where people take their
pecans to have them shelled by machine. Last Fall I took several garbage
cans to the man and he filled them with the shell pieces. I made some ash
out of some for a test.....just a basic ash glaze recipe. It was yellowish,
and nice, but I only did this one test. The effects could have been the
results of the sawdust/wood firing I tested it in and it would probably be
different in another kiln.
When we fired with wood in the Hogchain Groundhog Kiln over New Year's
Eve.....we shoveled the rest of the shells into the fire box (mainly cause
it was fun). I do believe they helped make nice ash on our pots. Pecan
shells are worth testing if you have them readily available.
Merrie

Hank Murrow on fri 29 sep 00


Carol wrote;

>Having done some research into the use of linseed straw ash glazes as an
>undergraduate, I have just started a postgraduate research project on the
>use of arable waste in ash glazes. At the moment I am starting with the
>straw from peas and beans but any glazes using 'non-wood' ashes are of great
>interest to me. Does anyone have any information or comments they would like
>to share?

Dear Carol;

You can get a good idea of what an ash will contribute to a glaze by
carefully regarding its function. Straw ash is pretty high in Si because
its job is to hold up the seed. Rice husk ash is much the same, because its
job is to protect the seed. Apple pulp, on the other hand, is high in
fluxes and phosphorus because it concentrated the growth elements for
fruiting. hard job = hard ash. Soft job = soft ash. just a rule of thumb to
start with. Cheers, Hank in Eugene

Carolyn Nygren Curran on sat 30 sep 00


Sander's book on Japanese Pottery is another source of information on ash,
too. And Robert Tichane has a book on ash glazes as well. cnc

Janet Kaiser on sat 30 sep 00


Carol

You might like to look at pages 40-1 in Ceramic
Review No. 183, May/June 2000. The article is
"Colour in Ash Glaze" by Eric James Mellon and
includes a neat illustration of "ashes that
produce stable glazes low in calcium" (grasses,
small and tall bushes 0 to 25 feet) and "ashes
that produce unstable glazes (kinetic) high in
calcium" including fruit and tall trees 25 to 60
feet high.

Good luck with your work!

Janet Kaiser
The Chapel of Art . Capel Celfyddyd
HOME OF THE INTERNATIONAL POTTERS' PATH
Criccieth LL52 0EA, GB-Wales Tel: (01766) 523570
E-mail: postbox@the-coa.org.uk
WEBSITE: http://www.the-coa.org.uk

Janet Kaiser on sun 1 oct 00


He is not blowing his own trumpet, so I will be
so bold...

Our very own Phil Rogers published an excellent
book on this very subject. It is now a classic
around the globe. A "must read" text for anyone
interested in ash glazes and interesting enough
for everyone else to at least look through...

Come on Phil... Give them the ISBN and the
details!!

Janet Kaiser - who lent her copy to someone,
never to be seen again )-:

The Chapel of Art . Capel Celfyddyd
HOME OF THE INTERNATIONAL POTTERS' PATH
Criccieth LL52 0EA, GB-Wales Tel: (01766) 523570
E-mail: postbox@the-coa.org.uk
WEBSITE: http://www.the-coa.org.uk

----- Original Message -----

> Sander's book on Japanese Pottery is another
source of information on ash, too. And Robert
Tichane has a book on ash glazes as well.

philrogers pottery on sun 1 oct 00


Thank you Janet. Unfortunately or fortunately depending on your point of
view the reprint of the book is almost out of print although I think Axner
still has some in stock and A&C Black have a few left in the U.K. The ISBN
No.is 0-7136-3440-5.

I am currently working on a new updated edition which should be available in
2002.

Janet, your cheque is in the post!!

Phil.


Phil and Lynne Rogers,
Lower Cefn Faes,
RHAYADER.
Powys. LD6 5LT.
Tel/fax. (44) 01597 810875.
philrogers@ntlworld.com

----- Original Message -----
From: Janet Kaiser
To:
Sent: Sunday, October 01, 2000 3:00 AM
Subject: Re: ASH GLAZE RESEARCH


> He is not blowing his own trumpet, so I will be
> so bold...
>
> Our very own Phil Rogers published an excellent
> book on this very subject. It is now a classic
> around the globe. A "must read" text for anyone
> interested in ash glazes and interesting enough
> for everyone else to at least look through...
>
> Come on Phil... Give them the ISBN and the
> details!!
>
> Janet Kaiser - who lent her copy to someone,
> never to be seen again )-:
>
> The Chapel of Art . Capel Celfyddyd
> HOME OF THE INTERNATIONAL POTTERS' PATH
> Criccieth LL52 0EA, GB-Wales Tel: (01766) 523570
> E-mail: postbox@the-coa.org.uk
> WEBSITE: http://www.the-coa.org.uk
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> > Sander's book on Japanese Pottery is another
> source of information on ash, too. And Robert
> Tichane has a book on ash glazes as well.
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.
>

Teresa Speakman on mon 2 oct 00


Dear Phil,
I had been wondering if philrogers pottery was the same Phil Rogers, the
author of the Ash Glazes book that I studied last spring. I am grateful that
Ohio University-Lancaster has it in their library, although I must admit
that it was at my house for Spring Quarter! I am grateful to be able to
thank you for such a wonderfully inspiring account of wood ash glazes.

I was able to experiment with apple ash and wheat-straw/pampass-grass
ash at ^9-10, but presently have no access to high firings. Someone asked
about lower fired ash glazes, and I didn't notice any responses, but maybe I
missed it. Does anyone have suggestions for mid-range temps for ash glazes
or is there a necessity for higher heat.

The last firing I did at school was in a falling down, 20+ year old sprung
arch kiln, that could barely be reduced, with a particularly uneven fast
firing. The resulting ash glazes resulted in a beautiful bloated lava
texture which I love. I had read that this was a fault , but certainly only
in the eyes of the beholder!

I am going to experiment with lower fired ash glazes regardless of
response, but any input is appreciated.

Thanks again, Peace- Teresa in Ohio

philrogers pottery on tue 3 oct 00


Hello Teresa,

I have not done a lot with lower temperature ash glazes. I fire to Cone 11.
For me at least, there is a quality in the glaze at the higher temperature
that isn't there at the lower temperatures largely due to glaze body
interaction. However, Katherine Pleydell Bouverie achieved many beautiful
glazes at around 1200C by adding small amounts of Alkaline frit to the
batch. If you look in 'Ash Glazes' I think there is a recipe that might give
you a clue to the kind of quantity but around 5% may be a good place to
start. At the lower temperature you could try adding a small quantity of
salt to the glaze ( a couple of teaspoonfuls per 5 gallon bucket) The salt
in combination with present solubles does go some way in achieving a
body/glaze interaction but it is not as good as the real thing.

Hope that helps,

Phil.

Phil and Lynne Rogers,
Lower Cefn Faes,
RHAYADER.
Powys. LD6 5LT.
Tel/fax. (44) 01597 810875.
philrogers@ntlworld.com

----- Original Message -----
From: Teresa Speakman
To:
Sent: Tuesday, October 03, 2000 5:44 AM
Subject: Re: ASH GLAZE RESEARCH


> Dear Phil,
> I had been wondering if philrogers pottery was the same Phil Rogers,
the
> author of the Ash Glazes book that I studied last spring. I am grateful
that
> Ohio University-Lancaster has it in their library, although I must admit
> that it was at my house for Spring Quarter! I am grateful to be able to
> thank you for such a wonderfully inspiring account of wood ash glazes.
>
> I was able to experiment with apple ash and wheat-straw/pampass-grass
> ash at ^9-10, but presently have no access to high firings. Someone asked
> about lower fired ash glazes, and I didn't notice any responses, but maybe
I
> missed it. Does anyone have suggestions for mid-range temps for ash glazes
> or is there a necessity for higher heat.
>
> The last firing I did at school was in a falling down, 20+ year old
sprung
> arch kiln, that could barely be reduced, with a particularly uneven fast
> firing. The resulting ash glazes resulted in a beautiful bloated lava
> texture which I love. I had read that this was a fault , but certainly
only
> in the eyes of the beholder!
>
> I am going to experiment with lower fired ash glazes regardless of
> response, but any input is appreciated.
>
> Thanks again, Peace- Teresa in Ohio
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.
>

Carol Metcalfe on thu 12 oct 00


Hello again!

First of all, many, many thanks to everyone who replied to my posting. As a
beginner at email and the Internet, I am quite amazed at how many messages
I've had and so quickly!

I now realise, I should perhaps have mentioned in my original message that I
live in North Yorkshire, ENGLAND. This means some of your suggestions are
definitely NOT available to me, but if anyone else tries them out, I would
still love to hear about the results.

To pick up on the lower temperature debate, my linseed experiments were
fired to Cone 8, 1260 C in oxidation. Cone 11 is beyond the limits of my
electric kiln and lower temperatures in general would be better for the
elements. So, I am watching with interest and will perhaps be able to take
part of my research project in this direction as well.

Thanks again,
Carol

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Earl Krueger on thu 5 feb 04


Might be of interest to ash glazers.

A PDF document produced by State of Illinois entitled;
"Utilization of Illinois Fly Ash in Manufacturing of Ceramic Tiles"

Discusses various aspects of ash in glazes.

http://www.icci.org/01final/01mishulovich.pdf


Earl K...
Bothell, WA, USA

Carol Metcalfe on fri 19 mar 04


Just a note to let everyone know that my ash glaze research continues at the University of Sunderland but my email address has changed to carol.metcalfe@tesco.net . Some of the first tests I did were covered in an article I had in Ceramic Review last summer together with examples of plates using the glazes. I am currently exploring the differences between ashes from different growing seasons of arable crops. All my glazes are fired in the electric kiln to Cone 7, 1240C.

Would love to hear from anyone doing similar work.

Carol M

Ababi Sharon on fri 19 mar 04


I want to offer you the following test based on the high CaO in the ash:
ABABI'S RED ASH
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Cone 6 1222 deg.C. - =09
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

common ash 50.00
Kaolin CC31 15.00
Quartz 20.00
Wollastonite 15.00
Tin Oxide 7.00
Chrome Oxide 0.35
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
This is a matte glaze of course you can change it. I apply it very thick
Out of different ashes you might have different reds.
You can see it here:
http://members4.clubphoto.com/ababi306910/981929/
The last side
Ababi Sharon
Glaze wizard
Kibbutz Shoval Israel
ababisha@shoval.org.il
http://ababi.active.co.il
http://www.matrix2000.co.nz/Matrix%20Demo/Ababi.htm
A fast link Ceramics forum in Hebrew:
http://www.botzpottery.co.il/kishurim.html=20

-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Carol
Metcalfe
Sent: Friday, March 19, 2004 12:44 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: ash glaze research

Just a note to let everyone know that my ash glaze research continues at
the University of Sunderland but my email address has changed to
carol.metcalfe@tesco.net . Some of the first tests I did were covered
in an article I had in Ceramic Review last summer together with examples
of plates using the glazes. I am currently exploring the differences
between ashes from different growing seasons of arable crops. All my
glazes are fired in the electric kiln to Cone 7, 1240=B0C.

Would love to hear from anyone doing similar work.

Carol M
.