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cone 6 gold luster

updated tue 16 oct 07

 

Digital Studio on fri 12 oct 07


Hey everyone,
I'm new to Clayart, and excited because there are so many people on here
and a lot of things to read. :-)
I'm just wondering if anyone has any info about Gold Luster Glazes. I'm
looking at buying some but I have no idea about the firings for the kind
that I want.
Amaco's site says this:

Lustre and Metallic glazes can be used effectively in conjunction with
other glazes or dramatically by themselves. Lustre and Metallic glazes
can be high fired to Cone 4-6 (2161 -2269F, 1183 -1243C) with
fantastic results. It is recommended to apply these glazes by brushing
or sponging on a mature Cone 04 (1971F, 1077C) bisque fired surface.
L-518 only: fire to Cone 04 (1971F, 1077C).
I do my ceramic work at a college, and we fire Cone 08 bisque and Cone 6
glaze. Would I be able to put a luster glazed item in with the Cone 6
firing?
The gold luster from Amaco is L-518.
I also read that there are three separate firings for lusters? Is that
right?
I'm planning on doing something pretty small scale so I wouldn't want to
have to do a whole Cone 04 firing for one thing that might not even come
out to begin with.
I hope someone here is more experienced with Lusters than I am. :-)
--

Kendra Bogert
www.digital-studio.biz
641-208-6253

Carlee Weston on sat 13 oct 07


Kendra,

When a manufacturer recommends that a glaze be fired to cone 04 they have determined that the glaze works best and gives the desired results at that temperature. The difference between cone 04 and cone 6 is enough to make a glaze completely run off the pot during firing, ruining kiln shelves, other pots and possibly the kiln itself. That is not to say that with that knowledge you can't experiment to see what will happen, you might get a really super look. However, take precautions, you'll need to bisque your pieces to a higher temperature, and when you glaze fire I would suggest that you place your piece in a sagger to protect the rest of the kiln load.

Good luck,
Carlee
-------------- Original message from Digital Studio : --------------


> Hey everyone,
> I'm new to Clayart, and excited because there are so many people on here
> and a lot of things to read. :-)
> I'm just wondering if anyone has any info about Gold Luster Glazes. I'm
> looking at buying some but I have no idea about the firings for the kind
> that I want.
> Amaco's site says this:
>
> Lustre and Metallic glazes can be used effectively in conjunction with
> other glazes or dramatically by themselves. Lustre and Metallic glazes
> can be high fired to Cone 4-6 (2161 -2269F, 1183 -1243C) with
> fantastic results. It is recommended to apply these glazes by brushing
> or sponging on a mature Cone 04 (1971F, 1077C) bisque fired surface.
> L-518 only: fire to Cone 04 (1971F, 1077C).
> I do my ceramic work at a college, and we fire Cone 08 bisque and Cone 6
> glaze. Would I be able to put a luster glazed item in with the Cone 6
> firing?
> The gold luster from Amaco is L-518.
> I also read that there are three separate firings for lusters? Is that
> right?
> I'm planning on doing something pretty small scale so I wouldn't want to
> have to do a whole Cone 04 firing for one thing that might not even come
> out to begin with.
> I hope someone here is more experienced with Lusters than I am. :-)
> --
>
> Kendra Bogert
> www.digital-studio.biz
> 641-208-6253
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
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>
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William & Susan Schran User on sat 13 oct 07


On 10/13/07 12:15 AM, "Digital Studio" wrote:

> I do my ceramic work at a college, and we fire Cone 08 bisque and Cone 6
> glaze. Would I be able to put a luster glazed item in with the Cone 6
> firing?
> The gold luster from Amaco is L-518.
> I also read that there are three separate firings for lusters? Is that
> right?
> I'm planning on doing something pretty small scale so I wouldn't want to
> have to do a whole Cone 04 firing for one thing that might not even come
> out to begin with.
> I hope someone here is more experienced with Lusters than I am.

Though Amaco lists these glazes as lusters, do not think of them as lusters
as they are glazes with a high metallic content. Lusters are an overglaze
decoration fired at very low temperature (^018 - ^022).

Regarding your question about 3 separate firings - bisque, glaze then
overglaze luster firing - so yes, for true lusters, there is 3 firings.

Back during my undergrad studies we did our bisque firings at ^08 also. I
think that must have been some kind of tradition handed down over time. It
was only later in my career, after much research, that I found firing to at
least a ^06 or ^04 bisque was very beneficial to the results of the glaze
firings, practically eliminating all pin-holing due to out gassing of
compounds that were not burned out during the bisque.

Look back through the archives for bisque firing temperatures and you will
find this suggestion repeated over & over. Take this information to your
teacher and ask about it. Let you teacher know he/she is welcome to contact
me, or anybody else on this forum, and we'll all provide the same
information.

FYI - The luster glaze will probably perform just fine on the ^08 bisque.

Bill

--
William "Bill" Schran
wschran@cox.net
wschran@nvcc.edu
http://www.creativecreekartisans.com

Eleanora Eden on sat 13 oct 07


Hi Kendra,

You definitely don't want to use the ^04 lustre glaze at ^6.

The other thing I want to point out is that lustre firings produce really
nasty fumes. If you do mess around with them make certain that
the ventilation is really working well, not just for you but also for
all the other people working there.

I was once in a group studio where one person's commercial output
depended on gold lustre firings. It affected everybody in the building.
Awful!

Eleanora


>
>
>Lustre and Metallic glazes can be used effectively in conjunction with
>other glazes or dramatically by themselves. Lustre and Metallic glazes
>can be high fired to Cone 4-6 (2161 -2269=B0F, 1183 -1243=B0C) with
>fantastic results. It is recommended to apply these glazes by brushing
>or sponging on a mature Cone 04 (1971=B0F, 1077=B0C) bisque fired surface.
>L-518 only: fire to Cone 04 (1971=B0F, 1077=B0C).
>I do my ceramic work at a college, and we fire Cone 08 bisque and Cone 6
>glaze. Would I be able to put a luster glazed item in with the Cone 6
>firing?
>The gold luster from Amaco is L-518.




>Kendra Bogert
>www.digital-studio.biz
>641-208-6253

--
Bellows Falls Vermont
www.eleanoraeden.com

Donna Kat on sat 13 oct 07


On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 23:15:08 -0500, Digital Studio STUDIO.BIZ> wrote:

>Hey everyone,
>I'm new to Clayart, and excited because there are so many people on here
>and a lot of things to read. :-)
>I'm just wondering if anyone has any info about Gold Luster Glazes. I'm
>looking at buying some but I have no idea about the firings for the kind
>that I want.
>Amaco's site says this:
>
>Lustre and Metallic glazes can be used effectively in conjunction with
>other glazes or dramatically by themselves. Lustre and Metallic glazes
>can be high fired to Cone 4-6 (2161 -2269=B0F, 1183 -1243=B0C) with
>fantastic results. It is recommended to apply these glazes by brushing
>or sponging on a mature Cone 04 (1971=B0F, 1077=B0C) bisque fired surface.
>L-518 only: fire to Cone 04 (1971=B0F, 1077=B0C).
>I do my ceramic work at a college, and we fire Cone 08 bisque and Cone 6
>glaze. Would I be able to put a luster glazed item in with the Cone 6
>firing?
>The gold luster from Amaco is L-518.
>I also read that there are three separate firings for lusters? Is that
>right?
>I'm planning on doing something pretty small scale so I wouldn't want to
>have to do a whole Cone 04 firing for one thing that might not even come
>out to begin with.
>I hope someone here is more experienced with Lusters than I am. :-)
>--
>
>Kendra Bogert

The luster work I have seen, you put the luster (spray, sponge, paint)
over the pot that has been glazed fired. You then fire this to the
recommended temperature or cone. Every luster I know of is low fired. It
doesn't matter what the glaze firing is - I have seen it done on highfired
porcelain. This does not seem to follow what you are quoting (other than
for the L518).

What is really important is that you don't do this without talking with
the resident potter or whoever is in charge and getting permission. There
are several reasons they might not want this done in their kilns.

Donna

Snail Scott on sun 14 oct 07


Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2007 23:15:08 -0500
From: Digital Studio
Subject: Cone 6 Gold Luster

Kendra wrote, r.e. Amaco luster glazes:
>...we fire Cone 08 bisque and Cone 6
glaze. Would I be able to put a luster glazed item in with the Cone 6
firing? The gold luster from Amaco is L-518.
>...I also read that there are three separate firings for lusters? Is that right?...


Folks:
A great deal of confusion has arisen around this question!

Point 1: When almost all ceramics people discuss lusters,
they are referring to overglaze lusters, which are meant
to be applied on top of a previously matured glaze, and
fired to a very low temperature, usually between ^024 and
^018. They are not 'glazes' in their own right, but derive
their shininess from the glaze beneath, since the metallic
layer they produce is microscopically thin. This is the
gold effect known widely from the shiny edges on souvenir
ashtrays and fancy manufactured dinner plates. These
products generally come in tiny (1/10 ounce) jars. Other
forms of overglaze luster exist, including 'traditional'
or 'Persian' lusters which can be made from scratch. All
of these share the property of not being actual glazes
themselves, however, but overglaze treatments.

Point 2: A few commercial glaze manufacturers have lately
muddied the waters by selling shiny metallic glazes and
labeling them as 'luster'. Nothing wrong with that, in
that the word 'luster' may be used in English to refer
to shiny metallic effects. However, these products have
almost no similarities to the above-mentioned overglaze
lusters at all. These products are actual glazes which
happen to be shiny and metallic-looking. They are NOT
overglazes, and nothing anyone has ever said with
reference to overglaze lusters is remotely applicable
to these products!

Point 3: Many well-intentioned folks have offered their
knowledge of 'lusters', without realizing that these new
commercial ^4-6 metallic glazes exist, and thinking that
perhaps Kendra is confused. Well, she is, but that's only
due to the huge quantity of irrelevant information she
has inadvertently acquired, mostly referring to 'actual'
lusters, i.e. conventional overglaze lusters, not glazes.

Point 4: These are just glazes, Kendra, in spite of the
'luster' label. Fire them like glazes, as recommended on
the label. Bisque to your normal bisque temperature. Even
though the manufacturer suggests ^04, ^08 will almost
certainly be just fine, as bisque temps are much less
critical for stoneware than for earthenware. (Most
manufacturers still mostly produce earthenware glazes,
with stoneware glazes being more recent additions to
their product line. The '^04 bisque' recommendation is
mostly just habit for them - a carryover from their
standard earthenware labeling.) Then, fire to ^6, which
is within the range that the nice Amaco folks suggest a
nyway.

In other words, proceed as normal! You are doing fine.

-Snail

p.s. Shame on Amaco, and every other outfit whose new
metallic glazes are labelled 'luster'. Couldn't you
have found a term that's not already in use for a
related but utterly dissimilar material?

-S.


www.digital-studio.biz
641-208-6253