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tiles

updated wed 5 sep 07

 

tinam on wed 26 jun 96

Thanks Cynthia for starting this thread. I too have recently bought a
home (a 70 year old home) I plan to do some tile work and the advise has
been so helpful. I have been reading the ideas and going that's a cool
idea. Especially the ruler thing.... that was very cool...

My piece to add is something that I read on Clayart several months back.
There were several threads that dealt with drying tiles. The
recommendation was to dry the tiles on wall board sheets. This was
suggested to reduce the potential to get cracks during firing. I haven't
tried this myself but will in the near future. I haven't set up the
studio yet. It will be my first unless you count my kitchen at the old
apartment. If anyone can make suggestions about studio space in a
daylight basement I would welcome anything that you have to say.

Tina Morris

Ellen Barrosse on mon 10 mar 97

Please excuse me if this subject has already been discussed. I tried to
search the archives, but there appears to be no automatic way to do it, and
the non-automatic way is impossibly slow.

I am looking for information on the Arts and Crafts tiles, of the sort made
by Grueby, the Moravian Tile Factory, Rookwood, etc. I am interested in
glaze recipes. Does anyone know of a resource for this information?

Thank you for your help.

Ellen

PJLewing@aol.com on tue 11 mar 97

The resource you're looking for is the Tile Heritage Foundation, PO Box 1850,
Healdsburg, CA, 95448, phone 707-431-8453. I'm sure they could steer you in
the right direction, and they put out the most amazingly complete listing of
books on the history, techniques, and esthetics of tile you can imagine.
Paul Lewing, Seattle

jpyle@hs.gettysburg.edu on wed 12 mar 97

Moravian Tileworks in Doylestown, PA may be willing to share. They use
some lead glazes, I think.
They do great workshops.

Judy Pyle in Gettysburg, PA

TCOLSON@raychem.com on thu 13 mar 97

Ellen-

>I am looking for information on the Arts and Crafts tiles, of the
>sort made by Grueby, the Moravian Tile Factory, Rookwood, etc. I am
>interested in glaze recipes. Does anyone know of a resource for this
>information?

I second Paul's recommendation to contact the Tile Heritage
Foundation. There is a lot of info about the THF on Tiles on the Web
(URL below). Also on TOTW are catalogs from a couple of major sources
for books on tiles and a list of reprints of early 20th C tile
catalogs.

Regards,

Tom Colson tcolson@aimnet.com
Tiles On The Web: http://www.aimnet.com/~tcolson/webtiles.htm
The web site for handmade and historic ceramic tiles.

the Gallagher's on fri 14 mar 97

Hello,
I am looking for a slip recipe for use on bisque. I had one that was sent to
the Clayart list, but I have lost it. I hope you will be able to help me.

Thanks,
Michelle
Portland, Oregon

Andrew S Lubow on sun 16 mar 97

I've an untested one from the Reader's Digest Crafts and Hobbies book
that may work for you.

Cone 04- 9 White Slip Base For Bisque
in parts
Neph Sy 20
EPK 25
OM #4 20
Flint 30
Borax 5
Bentonite 3

Colorants: in parts

Blue Cobalt Carb 5
Yellow Ochre 2
Manganese Dioxide 1

Green Copper Carbonate 10

Yellow Vanadium Stain 10

Black Manganese Dioxide 10
Red Iron Oxide 8
Cobalt Carb 5

Pearly Yellow Rutile 10

Blue Green Chromium Oxide 4
Cobalt Carb 3

Live every day like it was your last. Some day you'll be right!!
Benny Hill


On Fri, 14 Mar 1997 06:56:30 EST "the Gallagher's"
writes:
>----------------------------Original
>message----------------------------
>Hello,
>I am looking for a slip recipe for use on bisque. I had one that was
>sent to
>the Clayart list, but I have lost it. I hope you will be able to help
>me.
>
>Thanks,
>Michelle
>Portland, Oregon
>

Sherry mcDonald Stewart on thu 17 apr 97

I live in Washington, and I am looking for a place to work this summer
to get together a new series of tiles that I design for installations
(public, hopefully). I don't require a huge studio, but I would like a
nice place to work, not in a basement, but a place that is esthetically
pleasing. Must be complete with most chemicals. I work with plaster ,
but I keep everything clean and seperated. One of the nearby islands
would be nice, San Juans, Orcas, etc. I am also interested in someone to
collaborate with. My tiles are small, and primitive fired, in relief.
Have some new ideas for another series. Please contact me if you are
close by, or even if you are far away, and have similiar interests.

Marion Barnes-Schwartz. on thu 13 aug 98

Laura,
I have made tiles but have not grooved the backs. My tiles so far haven't
been any larger than 5"x5". I do take a lot of care in drying them. I stack
the wet tiles (once they can be moved without messing them - a few hours after
rolling and cutting) one on top of the other on sheetrock, with many (10 or
more) going into each stack. I top with sheetrock then use bricks to weight
the stacks, then let them air dry. I also bisque fire very slowly with fine
grog sprinkled on the kiln shelves. I stack them on the kiln shelves with no
more than 3 to 5 in a stack.
Marion

Ernesto Burciaga on thu 28 nov 02


Way back in my youth, or at least a number of yars ago I came accross a book about tile
making. the author used a home made contrapction to press 3D tiles. Can anyone out
there remember the title and or author?

Ernesto Burciaga

Lily Krakowski on sun 8 jun 03


In the past two weeks or so there have been two queries re: tiles, which, to
the best of my knowledge have not been addressed.

The second was from a man who had inherited "4 boxes" tiles from his mother
who had salvaged them from an old school, and had them put on a table--I
assume as table top.

What should he do with them? The table had disintegrated, but the tiles
were good.

Why not get a welder to make a nice metal table with a frame around the top
and put your tiles in there? If he puts a hole in the middle you can put
the thing outside with a big handsome umbrella and have the nicest picnic
table in town. Or you can have a woodworker make any sort of table, a
coffee table is good. Or a set of those adorable small tables that fit
together one beneath the other....Or build what the British call a "dresser"
we tend to call a "hutch" and place your tile on the shelf space in the
middle...

Failing that, a splashboard, a surround in the dining room (make harmonious
dishes) or if your climate allows a small goldfish pond....

The first person send a message I did not fully understand, even after
several readings.

AS I READ IT she would like to buy commercial tiles such as are sold for
flooring, and glaze SOME of them, to be placed strategically along with the
others. She seemed concerned about absorption and the problems of glazing.

I apologize at this point if I misread.

Assuming I got it right: I went out and licked some white tiles such as are
sold for bathroom walls. These were made in GB many years ago and given me
by a decorator friend. I glazed them, fired them at c.6 and they were my
splashboard till last year when I had the kitchen "redone". (Creeping
Suburbia, I'm telling you!) These tiles gave me no problem at all. They
remain absorbent--not much but still.

I then tried some quarry tiles (new, clean) left over from the redoing
above. They also are absorbent.My guess is as much, no more nor less, than
the white tile.

So I THINK it fair to conclude that these tiles are meant to be a little
absorbent. Ok. So unless you wash your kitchen floor grande eau, Deluge
style, I see no problem. A friend who was very good housekeeper had a
quarry tile kitchen floor with a central floor drain, and when she mopped
she MOPPED (she had four sons) and I never heard of a problem.

The problem I DO foresee is that while tiles sold for floors seem reasonably
"slip proof", your glazing them might make them slippery-when-wet. Risk
would depend on where the tiles are--

Regardless of what use they would be put to: buy a few single tiles and
test your intended glazes on several....









Lili Krakowski
P.O. Box #1
Constableville, N.Y.
(315) 942-5916/ 397-2389

Be of good courage....

wendy laubach on mon 9 jun 03


I was the one with questions about wet-area floor tiles. All of you, ple=
ase
bear with me, as I an as ignorant of this area as anyone could possibly b=
e.
Things you take for granted I know absolutely nothing about.

I don't want to use commercial tiles that are ready for installation -- I
just want to acquire bisque tiles rather than make the tiles myself, then=
I
want to glaze them myself. I need them to be strong enough to hold up to
foot traffic and non-porous enough to hold up to a good bit of water.
These are not for a shower, but I think it's prudent to plan on a bathroo=
m
floor being pretty darn wet from time to time. All you need is a little
flaw in the grout, and next thing you know there's standing water next to
the tile for many hours at a time.

We have now experimented with cone 04 bisque tiles, using both glaze and
underglaze/clearcoat fired at cone 05. Both types of tile, when submerge=
d
in water after firing, gave off tiny but visible air bubbles, which I ass=
ume
would be a bad sign for long-term use. A damp spot seemed to creep under
the clear matt glaze, for instance, and I fear mold problems.

But I've now found a source for terra cotta bisque tiles that I'm told wi=
ll
mature at cone 6, to a nice off-white background color, so we've sent off
for some cone 6 glazes and underglazes and will experiment with these.

This is definitely amateur hour for us. You should see how bad our first
attempt at underglazing looked! Nasty blotches in what were intended to=
be
uniform color fields of up to two inches across. We're having better luc=
k
now flowing the underglaze on with a little squeeze bottle with a tiny ti=
p.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Lily Krakowski"
To:
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2003 7:07 PM
Subject: Re: Tiles


> In the past two weeks or so there have been two queries re: tiles, whic=
h,
to
> the best of my knowledge have not been addressed.
>
> The second was from a man who had inherited "4 boxes" tiles from his
mother
> who had salvaged them from an old school, and had them put on a table--=
I
> assume as table top.
>
> What should he do with them? The table had disintegrated, but the tile=
s
> were good.
>
> Why not get a welder to make a nice metal table with a frame around th=
e
top
> and put your tiles in there? If he puts a hole in the middle you can p=
ut
> the thing outside with a big handsome umbrella and have the nicest picn=
ic
> table in town. Or you can have a woodworker make any sort of table, a
> coffee table is good. Or a set of those adorable small tables that fit
> together one beneath the other....Or build what the British call a
"dresser"
> we tend to call a "hutch" and place your tile on the shelf space in the
> middle...
>
> Failing that, a splashboard, a surround in the dining room (make
harmonious
> dishes) or if your climate allows a small goldfish pond....
>
> The first person send a message I did not fully understand, even after
> several readings.
>
> AS I READ IT she would like to buy commercial tiles such as are sold fo=
r
> flooring, and glaze SOME of them, to be placed strategically along wit=
h
the
> others. She seemed concerned about absorption and the problems of
glazing.
>
> I apologize at this point if I misread.
>
> Assuming I got it right: I went out and licked some white tiles such a=
s
are
> sold for bathroom walls. These were made in GB many years ago and give=
n
me
> by a decorator friend. I glazed them, fired them at c.6 and they were =
my
> splashboard till last year when I had the kitchen "redone". (Creeping
> Suburbia, I'm telling you!) These tiles gave me no problem at all. T=
hey
> remain absorbent--not much but still.
>
> I then tried some quarry tiles (new, clean) left over from the redoing
> above. They also are absorbent.My guess is as much, no more nor less, t=
han
> the white tile.
>
> So I THINK it fair to conclude that these tiles are meant to be a litt=
le
> absorbent. Ok. So unless you wash your kitchen floor =E0 grande eau, D=
eluge
> style, I see no problem. A friend who was very good housekeeper had a
> quarry tile kitchen floor with a central floor drain, and when she mopp=
ed
> she MOPPED (she had four sons) and I never heard of a problem.
>
> The problem I DO foresee is that while tiles sold for floors seem
reasonably
> "slip proof", your glazing them might make them slippery-when-wet. Ri=
sk
> would depend on where the tiles are--
>
> Regardless of what use they would be put to: buy a few single tiles a=
nd
> test your intended glazes on several....
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Lili Krakowski
> P.O. Box #1
> Constableville, N.Y.
> (315) 942-5916/ 397-2389
>
> Be of good courage....
>
>
_________________________________________________________________________=
___
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Gary and Carla Goldberg on mon 9 jun 03


Wendy - Since you seem rather new at making tiles, I have a concern about
the type of glaze you are going to use. Anytime you are using tiles in a
wet surface area (like bathrooms or entry ways) you need to make sure the
glaze has some time of texture to it. I'm not talking visually, I'm talking
like a sandy type raised surface. This cuts down on the opportunity of
people slipping and breaking their neck on the floor.

Sometimes some of this can be done with the type of clay you select, but I'm
assuming that your commercially purchased tiles are smooth. When using the
biqued tiles, make sure you spongue off all the powerdy dust before glazing.

Keep in mind that floor tiles are usually thicker than wall tiles. Make
sure your bisque blanks can work on the floor. The thicker ones have less a
chance of cracking.

Regarding all your questions about water, etc. - I don't know much about
that, I have only made wall tiles. But here are some thoughts...
When you submerged your tiles in water they would absorb some since I assume
you did not glaze both sides of the tiles. They will naturally absorb
water, put a wet spongue to the back of a commercial tile and see for
yourself. Remember that the mortor/mastic and grout also act as a sealer.
The tile itself does not have to be totally nonabsorbing. Call me too
relaxed, but I think you are trying to make this too technical.

Good Luck, Carla
Creative Clay Concepts Inc.
http://creativeclay.tripod.com/home.html



----- Original Message -----
From: "wendy laubach"
To:
Sent: Monday, June 09, 2003 5:27 AM
Subject: Re: Tiles


> I was the one with questions about wet-area floor tiles. All of you,
please
> bear with me, as I an as ignorant of this area as anyone could possibly
be.
> Things you take for granted I know absolutely nothing about.
>
> I don't want to use commercial tiles that are ready for installation -- I
> just want to acquire bisque tiles rather than make the tiles myself, then
I
> want to glaze them myself. I need them to be strong enough to hold up to
> foot traffic and non-porous enough to hold up to a good bit of water.
> These are not for a shower, but I think it's prudent to plan on a bathroom
> floor being pretty darn wet from time to time. All you need is a little
> flaw in the grout, and next thing you know there's standing water next to
> the tile for many hours at a time.
>
> We have now experimented with cone 04 bisque tiles, using both glaze and
> underglaze/clearcoat fired at cone 05. Both types of tile, when submerged
> in water after firing, gave off tiny but visible air bubbles, which I
assume
> would be a bad sign for long-term use. A damp spot seemed to creep under
> the clear matt glaze, for instance, and I fear mold problems.
>
> But I've now found a source for terra cotta bisque tiles that I'm told
will
> mature at cone 6, to a nice off-white background color, so we've sent off
> for some cone 6 glazes and underglazes and will experiment with these.
>
> This is definitely amateur hour for us. You should see how bad our first
> attempt at underglazing looked! Nasty blotches in what were intended to
be
> uniform color fields of up to two inches across. We're having better luck
> now flowing the underglaze on with a little squeeze bottle with a tiny
tip.
>

Lily Krakowski on mon 9 jun 03


Wendy. In clay bisque means unglazed. As a rule potters bisque fire at low
temperatures and glaze fire at higher temperatures. This is because we want
absorbency to make glazes adhere upon application. (China in factories is
bisqued HIGH and glazed LOW--no idea how they do it, and it does not matter
here.)

That means that you can get tiles--such as quarry tiles--at suppliers, tiles
"ready for installation" but still porous enough to accept glaze...
And that is what I was thinking about...these are tiles meant for floors...





wendy laubach writes:


> I don't want to use commercial tiles that are ready for installation -- I
> just want to acquire bisque tiles rather than make the tiles myself, then I
> want to glaze them myself.

Dean Walker on tue 10 jun 03


The highr fire the better where floor tile is concered. The lower fire
tiles just aren't sturdy enough for floors. ^10 would be better than 6. 04 or 06
should only be used on the wall or decorative table tops. If you go to Home
Depot and check the ceramic floor tiles, the higher fire ones are more
expensive but they last longer on the floor.

Dean
been on vacation San Antonio to Sopchoppy

Jim Tabor on tue 10 jun 03


Hi Lili-

My brief take on your tile issues from about a decade of glazing commercial
tiles that went on floors, walls, counter tops, and outdoor signs. It is
best to first select the tile you want to use and limit your testing to it.
Talc body (white) bisque tile are soft and easy to cut and are common on
walls and floors; however' gloss glazed (your commercial glazes too) are
soft enough to show wear (dulled matt surface) in time. Four crystals from a
rock shop can be used for a scratch test on a commercial floor tile and
compared to your glazed results to determine if your glazes are likely to
hold up. Mohs' scale of hardness crystals are pretty cheap. Apatite is 5
(softer), Orthoclase is 6, Quartz 7, and Topaz 8 (harder). Quarry tile come
in a range of colors and are much stronger than the white talc body. They
can be glazed but are not porous if properly made and may give you some
problems glazing as well as getting a good glaze fit. Your underglaze may
also need a small amount of clear added to it.


Although I glazed tiles when I had to for a specified color, I used glazed
tile most of the time and painted on them but most often printed and then
fired to a point I remelted the glaze to set my application into the glaze.
Scratch tests for hardness on floor tile insured the image was as strong as
the glaze. Temperature on refired tile was usually around 2000F; however,
some tile will not go that high without warping and overfiring can also
change the glaze color a lot. Get a selection of different tile to fire at
the same time to see how they hold up. Test fire a least 5 of the same tiles
from several different companys at 2000F and see if any warp, change color,
or break before the choice to test for glazes and decoration. On glaze
colors are simple with stain(s), frit, and small amount of kaolin. Brush
over the tile in a thick to thin application for test firing. You could try
to flux the underglaze with enough clear to also see how well you can put it
into the remelted glaze. Make a variety of tests to compare your choices and
you may find what your looking for of even discover effects you like better.

Jim Tabor


> I don't want to use commercial tiles that are ready for installation -- I
> just want to acquire bisque tiles rather than make the tiles myself, then I
> want to glaze them myself. I need them to be strong enough to hold up to
> foot traffic and non-porous enough to hold up to a good bit of water.

> We have now experimented with cone 04 bisque tiles, using both glaze and
> underglaze/clearcoat fired at cone 05. Both types of tile, when submerged
> in water after firing, gave off tiny but visible air bubbles, which I assume
> would be a bad sign for long-term use. A damp spot seemed to creep under
> the clear matt glaze, for instance, and I fear mold problems.
>
> But I've now found a source for terra cotta bisque tiles that I'm told will
> mature at cone 6, to a nice off-white background color, so we've sent off
> for some cone 6 glazes and underglazes and will experiment with these.
>

Lily Krakowski on tue 10 jun 03


Jim: You are a dear, and SO nice, and SO right. But it is not I who
contemplates making tiles etc, but one Wendy, who, I am sure, will find what
you wrote immensely useful. (I do not like tile floors indoors.....)


Jim Tabor writes:

> Hi Lili-
>
> My brief take on your tile issues from about a decade of glazing commercial
> tiles that went on floors, walls, counter tops, and outdoor signs. It is
> best to first select the tile you want to use and limit your testing to it.

Gene and Dolita Dohrman on sun 27 jul 03


llene and Catherine, Would love to see your tile work. Am thinking of =
doing tiles for my kitchen backsplash. Never done them before. Any =
suggestions? Has anyone else done this? Dolita

dohrman@insightbb.com
Gene and Dolita Dohrman
1811 Edenside Avenue
Louisville, Ky 40204
Phone 502-749-1513

Annette Frank on mon 28 jul 03


Dolita, - my backsplash project was a success. I made tiles representing
interst of my family members (birds, violin, expresso maker, etc. and
connected it all with abstract tiles harmonious with the countertop
color. I found a great method for switch plate design in the archives.
Marion Barnschwa listed it on September 1, 2001. If you can't find it,
or if you have questions write to me.
Annette

> Am thinking of doing tiles for my kitchen backsplash. Never done them before. Any suggestions? Has anyone else done this? Dolita
>
>dohrman@insightbb.com
>Gene and Dolita Dohrman
>1811 Edenside Avenue
>Louisville, Ky 40204
>Phone 502-749-1513
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>

John Thompson on tue 4 sep 07


Hi Karen,=0A=0AWhen I ordered my sinks from BCpottery we spoke about time. =
They make hand cut tile, I have a pattern of tile sizes I need to order a=
nd from what I can understand you just send them the sizes or if it is like=
mine a pattern in a tile counter or backsplash and they will cut it and sh=
ip it as bisque tile. I beleave all they make is cone 10 and 6 tiles, in 3=
different bodies.=0A=0AHope this helps=0A=0AJ=0A=0A=0A =0A__________=
__________________________________________________________________________=
=0ABe a better Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who kno=
ws. Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.=0Ahttp://answers.yahoo.com/dir/?link=3Dl=
ist&sid=3D396545469