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soda/salt kilns

updated sat 16 dec 06

 

LYN PEELLE on tue 29 oct 96



I've just purchased an elec.kiln(Cress) that's unusable as an elec. kiln
and am interested in turning it into a Salt or Soda vapor kiln. I need
any infor on anything concerning it. What type of burner is best? Where is
the best place to place the burner hole? etc. etc. Any and allhelp will be
greatly appreicated! Thanks
Lyn

Carol Craiglow on thu 31 oct 96

LYN PEELLE wrote:
>
> ----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>
> I've just purchased an elec.kiln(Cress) that's unusable as an elec. kiln
> and am interested in turning it into a Salt or Soda vapor kiln. I need
> any infor on anything concerning it. What type of burner is best? Where is
> the best place to place the burner hole? etc. etc. Any and allhelp will be
> greatly appreicated! Thanks
> LynSuggest Ruthanne Tudball's relatively new book "Soda Glazing". Only 20
bucks and filled with info.

Carol, Grand Junction, Colorado, USA

Vince Pitelka on wed 13 dec 06


> Vince, Edouard, I was under the impression that it is the binder in the
> high alumina bricks that fails under salt fire conditions and that is
> why there has been a shift to the use of silca bricks that basically
> glaze over to prevent vapor penetration. WHat is the type binder that
> would be used in the dolomite posts?

Craig -
I don't see how the binder is a concern. The binder would be clay, but the
point is that the accumulation of sodium in the high alumina brick simply
causes it to expand internally with each firing. That eventually causes the
surface to spall, and it makes the whole kiln shift around.
- Vince

Vince Pitelka
Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee Technological University
Smithville TN 37166, 615/597-6801 x111
vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu
http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/
http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/

Edouard Bastarache Inc. on wed 13 dec 06


Hello Vince,

thanks for your answer, but i have another question :

What about "high dolomitic" hard bricks. I have some that
I use as 13 inches kiln posts?


Later,



Edouard Bastarache
Le Fran=E7ais Volant
The Flying Frenchman

Sorel-Tracy
Quebec
edouardb@sorel-tracy.qc.ca
www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
http://www.flickr.com/photos/30058682@N00/
http://www.ceramique.com/cerambooks/rayons/technologie.php

Vince Pitelka on wed 13 dec 06


Edouard wrote:
:What about "high dolomitic" hard bricks. I have some that
I use as 13 inches kiln posts?"


Edouard -
I do not specifically know about them, but in this thread on the list there
has been quite a bit of discussion of high-calicium refractories, and of
course dolomite is a double carbonate of calcium and magnesium. Do you know
the manufacturer? It would be interesting to see the specifications.
- Vince

Vince Pitelka
Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee Technological University
Smithville TN 37166, 615/597-6801 x111
vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu
http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/
http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/

Craig Clark on wed 13 dec 06


Vince, Edouard, I was under the impression that it is the binder in the
high alumina bricks that fails under salt fire conditions and that is
why there has been a shift to the use of silca bricks that basically
glaze over to prevent vapor penetration. WHat is the type binder that
would be used in the dolomite posts?
Craig DUnn Clark
619 East 11 1/2 St
Houston, Texas 77008
(713)861-2083
mudman@hal-pc.org

Vince Pitelka wrote:
> Edouard wrote:
> :What about "high dolomitic" hard bricks. I have some that
> I use as 13 inches kiln posts?"
>
>
> Edouard -
> I do not specifically know about them, but in this thread on the list
> there
> has been quite a bit of discussion of high-calicium refractories, and of
> course dolomite is a double carbonate of calcium and magnesium. Do
> you know
> the manufacturer? It would be interesting to see the specifications.
> - Vince
>
> Vince Pitelka
> Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee Technological University
> Smithville TN 37166, 615/597-6801 x111
> vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu
> http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/
> http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
>
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>

Edouard Bastarache Inc. on wed 13 dec 06


Craig,

I do not know about the composition of my dolomite
bricks
I use as kiln posts.

But I jkow that pitch or polymer resins may be
used as binders.

We have run into some problem in a steelmill
because ladles must be
heated before being used, otherwise they will
explode when 150 tons
of molten steel is poured into them. So, during
the first pre-heating period,
many chemicals are expelled into the environment
of the melting
department from the polymer resin. It was not
hazardous but annoying
to the workers, especially the overcrane
operators.


Later,



Edouard Bastarache
Le Franšais Volant
The Flying Frenchman

Sorel-Tracy
Quebec
edouardb@sorel-tracy.qc.ca
www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
http://www.flickr.com/photos/30058682@N00/
http://www.ceramique.com/cerambooks/rayons/technologie.php






----- Original Message -----
From: "Craig Clark"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, December 13, 2006 7:21 PM
Subject: Re: Soda/Salt kilns


> Vince, Edouard, I was under the impression that
> it is the binder in the
> high alumina bricks that fails under salt fire
> conditions and that is
> why there has been a shift to the use of silca
> bricks that basically
> glaze over to prevent vapor penetration. WHat is
> the type binder that
> would be used in the dolomite posts?
> Craig DUnn Clark
> 619 East 11 1/2 St
> Houston, Texas 77008
> (713)861-2083
> mudman@hal-pc.org
>
> Vince Pitelka wrote:
>> Edouard wrote:
>> :What about "high dolomitic" hard bricks. I
>> have some that
>> I use as 13 inches kiln posts?"
>>
>>
>> Edouard -
>> I do not specifically know about them, but in
>> this thread on the list
>> there
>> has been quite a bit of discussion of
>> high-calicium refractories, and of
>> course dolomite is a double carbonate of
>> calcium and magnesium. Do
>> you know
>> the manufacturer? It would be interesting to
>> see the specifications.
>> - Vince
>>
>> Vince Pitelka
>> Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee
>> Technological University
>> Smithville TN 37166, 615/597-6801 x111
>> vpitelka@dtccom.net, wpitelka@tntech.edu
>> http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/
>> http://www.tntech.edu/craftcenter/
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________________
>>
>> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>>
>> You may look at the archives for the list or
>> change your subscription
>> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>>
>> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may
>> be reached at
>> melpots@pclink.com.
>>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or
> change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
> reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>

Ivor and Olive Lewis on fri 15 dec 06


Dear Edouard Bastarache,

You ask as 13 inches kiln posts?>

Now that sets up a pretty conundrum. Dolomite is a mixture of Magnesia =
and Lime Carbonates. We are told and taught Magnesia and Lime are high =
temperature fluxes. So they should melt shouldn't they?

More info needed Edouard.

Best regards,

Ivor Lewis.
Redhill,
South Australia.

Edouard Bastarache Inc. on fri 15 dec 06


Hello Ivor,

I will try to check with a "brick engineer" in a
local
steel mill the particular use of dolomite glazes.


Later,



Edouard Bastarache
Le Franšais Volant
The Flying Frenchman

Sorel-Tracy
Quebec
www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
www.thepottersshop.blogspot.com
http://www.ceramique.com/cerambooks/rayons/technologie.php
http://www.flickr.com/photos/30058682@N00/


----- Original Message -----
From: "Ivor and Olive Lewis"

To:
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2006 10:16 PM
Subject: Soda/Salt kilns


Dear Edouard Bastarache,

You ask I have some that I use as 13 inches kiln posts?>

Now that sets up a pretty conundrum. Dolomite is a
mixture of Magnesia and Lime Carbonates. We are
told and taught Magnesia and Lime are high
temperature fluxes. So they should melt shouldn't
they?

More info needed Edouard.

Best regards,

Ivor Lewis.
Redhill,
South Australia.

______________________________________________________________________________
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or
change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
reached at melpots@pclink.com.

Edouard Bastarache Inc. on fri 15 dec 06


Hello Ivor



From : National Lime Association





High-purity refractory "dolomite" (frequently called Doloma) and lower =
purity fettling grade "dead-burned dolomite" (usually referred to as =
DBD) are both manufactured by calcining dolomitic limestone. The method =
is similar to the manufacture of ordinary lime, except that the burning =
time is longer and temperatures considerably higher (in the range of =
1600 - 1850=BA C). High purity doloma is fired in rotary or shaft kilns =
to the upper end of the temperature range without the addition of =
impurities. The lower-purity DBD is fired in rotary kilns to the lower =
end of the temperature range, and iron oxides are added during =
calcinations to stabilize the resulting hard-burned quicklime against =
decomposition from moisture. High purity doloma is used to manufacture =
refractory bricks employed in cement and lime rotary kiln linings, and =
in steel ladles and refining vessels. DBD is used for the manufacture of =
monolithic patching and repair materials for steel furnaces.





Later,








Edouard Bastarache
Le Fran=E7ais Volant
The Flying Frenchman

Sorel-Tracy
Quebec
www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
www.thepottersshop.blogspot.com
http://www.ceramique.com/cerambooks/rayons/technologie.php
http://www.flickr.com/photos/30058682@N00/

Edouard Bastarache Inc. on fri 15 dec 06


Hello Ivor,

I have just checked with the "brick engineer".

High dolomite bricks are used in contact with
molten steel
in places like ladles as written in my last text.

Dolomite is also used in "ramming mixes" and on
the surface
of molten steel.

But, he cannot discuss the effect of soda/salt on
these bricks
in the case of ceramics, it is not his speciality.

I have used them at C/10 without any problem


Later,



Edouard Bastarache
Le Franšais Volant
The Flying Frenchman

Sorel-Tracy
Quebec
www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
www.thepottersshop.blogspot.com
http://www.ceramique.com/cerambooks/rayons/technologie.php
http://www.flickr.com/photos/30058682@N00/






----- Original Message -----
From: "Edouard Bastarache Inc."

To:
Sent: Friday, December 15, 2006 12:40 AM
Subject: Re: Soda/Salt kilns


> Hello Ivor,
>
> I will try to check with a "brick engineer" in a
> local
> steel mill the particular use of dolomite
> glazes.
>
>
> Later,
>
>
>
> Edouard Bastarache
> Le Franšais Volant
> The Flying Frenchman
>
> Sorel-Tracy
> Quebec
> www.sorel-tracy.qc.ca/~edouardb/Welcome.html
> http://perso.wanadoo.fr/smart2000/index.htm
> http://www.pshcanada.com/Toxicology.htm
> www.thepottersshop.blogspot.com
> http://www.ceramique.com/cerambooks/rayons/technologie.php
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/30058682@N00/
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Ivor and Olive Lewis"
>
> To:
> Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2006 10:16 PM
> Subject: Soda/Salt kilns
>
>
> Dear Edouard Bastarache,
>
> You ask > bricks.
> I have some that I use as 13 inches kiln posts?>
>
> Now that sets up a pretty conundrum. Dolomite is
> a
> mixture of Magnesia and Lime Carbonates. We are
> told and taught Magnesia and Lime are high
> temperature fluxes. So they should melt
> shouldn't
> they?
>
> More info needed Edouard.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Ivor Lewis.
> Redhill,
> South Australia.
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or
> change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
> reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or
> change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
> reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>