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mason stains

updated fri 20 jan 12

 

Karen Ottenbreit on sat 8 jun 96

Hello all those Mason Stain users,
I am asking this question on behalf on a non computer using friend
of mine... She would like to know which Mason stains will high fire in
reduction and are in the purple range of color. Thanks in advance.
Karen on the Kenai

June Perry on mon 24 jun 96

Has any one had success firing Mason stains to cone 10 in a reduction
atmosphere? If so, could you share which ones worked.

Thanks!

June Perry
EMail: Gurushakti@aol.com

Janathel M. Shaw on tue 25 jun 96

June:

I've found that the only stains that were vulnerable
to disappearing were the reds, lavender and
yellows. The blues, browns, black, greens,etc
survived. Just make sure that you use a reliable flux
like gerstley borate.

Richard Burkett on wed 26 jun 96


Janathel says:
>I've found that the only stains that were vulnerable
>to disappearing were the reds, lavender and
>yellows. The blues, browns, black, greens,etc
>survived. Just make sure that you use a reliable flux
>like gerstley borate.

You're right that these are the only colors that will probably survive as
anything close to the original color at cone 10. However in oxidation you may
get a wider range surviving in the cone 6-8 range. Mason publishes a data
sheet which gives the maximum temperature for all of its stains.

I'd suggest using frits instead of gerstley borate, which is FAR from
dependable or reliable as a flux, and due to the large amount of boron will
tend to dissolve and destroy a lot of stain colors, especially at higher
temperatures.

Jeanne Otis tested a large number of frits with a large number of stains at
cone 5-6 a few years ago and found, as I remember, that Ferro Frit 3124 was
overall the best in its ability to support the largest number of colors.

Richard Burkett -
School of Art, Design, & Art History, SDSU, San Diego, CA 92182-4805
E-mail: richard.burkett@sdsu.edu <-> Voice mail: (619) 594-6201

Pelly123@aol.com on fri 28 jun 96

Richard...does that mean that, if I'm using a 50% GB glaze, I should switch
it to 50% 3124? What about 3134?

Sue

FAY & RALPH LOEWENTHAL on sun 1 sep 96

Could anybody let me know who manufactures Mason Stains also if they have an
email address. I have a customer looking for ceramic underglaze pens. Who makes
them and how do I contact them? Being in Port Elizabeth South Africa is the best
place to live, but hellish difficult to get supplies. Please email me directly
at fayralph@sprintlink.co.za

Louis Howard Katz on sun 1 sep 96

Couldn't find an email address but here is the
HTTP address and snail address.
10 # minimum
http://www.ceramics.com/mason/

Mason Color Works, Inc.


250 East Second Street


PO Box 76


East Liverpool, OH 43920


Phone: (216) 385-4400


Fax: (216) 385-4488



On Sun, 1 Sep 1996, FAY & RALPH LOEWENTHAL
wrote:

> ----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> Could anybody let me know who manufactures Mason Stains also if they have an
> email address. I have a customer looking for ceramic underglaze pens. Who make
> them and how do I contact them? Being in Port Elizabeth South Africa is the be
> place to live, but hellish difficult to get supplies. Please email me directly
> at fayralph@sprintlink.co.za
>

***************************************************
*Louis Katz lkatz@falcon.tamucc.edu *
*Texas A&M University Corpus Christi *
*6300 Ocean Drive, Art Department *
*Corpus Christi, Tx 78412 *
*Phone (512) 994-5987 *
**************************************************


Jo on wed 16 oct 96

I have been trying to experiment with mason stains and I am getting very
unsatisfactory results. I think that I am perhaps mixing them with water in
the wrong proportions. Anyone have specific proportions that they mix their
stain with? Also, how do you apply them? Currently I paint the stain on and
then wipe it off like you do for iron oxide. When I fired my pots, they all
came out a dingy gray. The color I used was rose taupe. Any suggestions?

JO Fellows
Algonac, MI

Wendy Hampton on fri 18 oct 96

Hi,
When I use mason stains I use 50% stain and 50% frit (3110) to 1 cup of
water. I have airbrushed them and brushed them and both works well altho
airbrushing give a much more even color.
Wendy from Bainbridge island WA

ripster on wed 22 jan 97

I am new to this site, and I am thankful to be able to ask questions
and hopefully save time and learn "good" things for all of you. My
question has to do with Mason Stains--a totally new area for me. I
fire to cone 9-10 stoneware and porcelin and wonder if it is necessary
to add a flux to the stain so a clear or celedon glaze will not crawl.
I have noticed that some stains are sort of "dry" looking--esp. the
yellows and greeens. Will adding a fluxing agent help?
Also, is it better to put the stain on first then glaze over or do
just the opposite --or does it matter? I have also been experimenting
with foam stamps but have not been able to satisfactorily find a dense
enough foam to adequately service my design patterns. Any ideas?
Thanks in advance -Steve

LYN PEELLE on tue 11 feb 97



Hi
Yesterday I saw some recipes using Gertsly Borate and of ops
or a Frit (3110) i believe with Mason Stains to form a slip like
for underglazing. Two requests hee---1 I (like a ninny) lost
the info concerning proportions of what to stain and 2 would k
it work as a decoration on smoked (pit fired) ware?? (Or could yu simply use
the stain striaght?)
Thanks.
Lyn

marg on mon 3 nov 97

Ken,

Depending on the color, you might try to use one of the Ferro Frits. I
use 3124 or 3134 direct substitution for the Gersley Borate. This works
on the pinks, purples and some yellows. The roughness could just be too
thick an application or not enough GB. Hope this helps.

Marg (in Baton Rouge)

Anthony G Allison on thu 2 apr 98

Hello All,

Just got back from a one month tour of the south, making and selling pots as
we went. It was an interesting trip.

My question is this: what, if anything, can you mix with mason stains to
keep the color from disappearing in high fire (cone 10) reduction? I have
tried porcelain slip, but no luck. Any info is appreciated.

Its great to ber back home but got dumped on the day we got home with a
blizzard. What a welcome!

Thanks,

Tony

Craig Martell on fri 3 apr 98

At 08:00 AM 4/2/98 EST, Tony Allison wrote:
>----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>My question is this: what, if anything, can you mix with mason stains to
>keep the color from disappearing in high fire (cone 10) reduction? I have
>tried porcelain slip, but no luck. Any info is appreciated.

Tony:

I use several Mason stains at cone 10R in reduction and Salt. Most work
just fine, but some won't, especially the chrome-tin compounds. It would be
helpful if you could mention specific stains you've tried.

regards, Craig Martell-Oregon

Mmpottery on sat 4 apr 98

I was wondering if salt firing does something weird to Mason Stains. I mean
does the sodium turn the colors to other colors?? Thanks

Paul Lewing on sat 4 apr 98

Tony,

Which Mason stains will work at cone 10 in reduction and which won't
is hard to generalize. Some are lost to the heat, some to the
reduction, but some are fine.

Blues, greens and browns tend to be OK, except that all the blues come
out cobalt blue, and all the greens come out chrome green, instead of
coming out all those different shades. If the browns have chrome in
them, you need to use them in the right base glaze.

Blacks will usually be fine. Greys are tricky. The chrome ones are a
problem, but I use a chrome-free grey, which I think is not made by
Mason called C790. Never tried it at ^10R though. Try iron chromate
for grey at ^10R in a magnesium base.

Yellow is a problem. The antimony yellows disappear above about ^01,
and the vanadium ones are ruined by reduction, but will go to ^10.
I'm not sure about the chrome yellow. The praesodymium yellow will go
to ^10 even in reduction, but it's a pretty weak color. The Dark
Praesodymium is a little better than the Light.

There is one pink that will work. I forget the number, but almost all
the pinks/rose/coral colors are chrome colors. There's one that's
Silica and Alumina only. Duncan makes an underglaze out of this stuff
called Miami Pink that will survive ^10R.

You need to get one of the data sheets that Mason puts out with the
ingredients of all the stains, and info on temperature, atmosphere,
and base glaze. It's very helpful.

Happy testing.

Paul Lewing, Seattle

Tony Hansen on sun 5 apr 98

> what, if anything, can you mix with mason stains to keep
> the color from disappearing in high fire (cone 10) reduction? I
> have tried porcelain slip, but no luck. Any info is appreciated.

Mason provides guidance on what types of chemistries are friendly and
hostile to each stain type. There are many different chrome-tin colors
for example, but none of them like zinc and they need lots of calcia.
Thus you need to evaluate the medium into which you mix the stain
in terms of its oxide makeup.

Something else to remember about stains: The color comes out far
better if they are in a glaze than in a non-vitreous slip. This
is doubly true if the glaze is transparent and thick. The depth
gives intense color. If you mix stain into a porcelain slip you only
see the bits of stain on the surface and they don't have intense
color. That's why you have to use 5 times more stain in a body
than in a glaze. Try this once: Compare the color of a clear glaze
with 7.5% stain with an opacified version of the same glaze with
the same amount of stain. The opacified one will be much lighter in
color.

--
T o n y H a n s e n thansen@digitalfire.com
Don't fight the glaze dragon alone
INSIGHT, Magic of Fire at http://digitalfire.com

Michelle Mosher on mon 6 apr 98

The lighter colored Mason stains will all fire out at higher temperatures,
just the nature of the materials used to make the colors. The more
stronger the color, the higher you can fire it. Peacock green and Teal
will both go to cone 10, the others usually burn out by cone 6.

Shelly Mosher
SFASU grad student
In Nacanowhere Texas (Nacogdoches)

On Thu, 2 Apr 1998, Anthony G Allison wrote:

> ----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> Hello All,
>
> Just got back from a one month tour of the south, making and selling pots as
> we went. It was an interesting trip.
>
> My question is this: what, if anything, can you mix with mason stains to
> keep the color from disappearing in high fire (cone 10) reduction? I have
> tried porcelain slip, but no luck. Any info is appreciated.
>
> Its great to ber back home but got dumped on the day we got home with a
> blizzard. What a welcome!
>
> Thanks,
>
> Tony
>

Linhares on mon 13 apr 98


Tony,

I just pulled a "test" platter from the salt kiln a week ago and I was
surprised to see chrome tin maroon, orange and purple. I was using
some Amco Reward Velvet Underglazes which I have heard are zircronium
sillicate encapsulated. The kiln was lightly, almost residual, salted
and fired in a neutral to oxidizing atmosphere to cone 10 and the
underglazes were not under a glaze. The next thing is to start
testing chrome tin reds and other oxidation colors at cone 10 to see
what happen without the underglaze encapsulation. Let me know if you
do some tests in the salt kiln.

Paul in Morgantown, WV

Bruce Hunter on sun 15 nov 98

Mason stains do have MSDS's Because you buy them in a powder form,
like many clay ingredients they are an inhalation hazard. Each color has
it's own MSDS None of the ones that I have contain lead
Medium Blue 6313
Silica, crystalline Dust
Zinc oxide Dust, Fumes
Cobalt oxide
Your clay supply folks have this info. Just ask !

Jeff Seefeldt on mon 12 apr 99

What is the normal percent of mason stain to add to a glaze??

I'm using 5-20's as a base and having great fit to my clay body. I've
tried several oxides along with superpax 8-10 %: cobalt ox 2%, chrome
5%, copper carb 5%, mang 5%, and getting good results. Is the
percentage of mason stains that you need to use consistant across all
stains? and / or similar to the percentage I've been using with oxides?

thanks

jeff

The weather is great in western Illinois, except for the county just to
the north that was declared a disaster area because of last weekends
tornadoes.

I'm headed to Melbourne AU, on Tuesday are there any "cant miss" pottery
shops I need to check out??

Paul Lewing on wed 14 apr 99

Jeff Seefeldt wrote:
>
> ----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> What is the normal percent of mason stain to add to a glaze??
>
> I'm using 5-20's as a base and having great fit to my clay body. I've
> tried several oxides along with superpax 8-10 %: cobalt ox 2%, chrome
> 5%, copper carb 5%, mang 5%, and getting good results. Is the
> percentage of mason stains that you need to use consistant across all
> stains? and / or similar to the percentage I've been using with oxides?

Jeff,
This is like asking what is the normal percent of cream to put in
coffee. It depends- on whether you want a strong color or a pastel
color; on which stain it is; on what the base glaze is; on what the clay
body is; on how you fire it and to what temperature, and so on.
But to be just a bit more specific, when I try out a new stain color, I
usually test with 1% stain, then add increments of 2% up to 9%. As a
general rule 1% of a stain in most glazes will give a noticeable but
very pale color, and additions of over about 8 or 9% will make no more
pronounced a color.
I've also noticed that with a base glaze with a high SiO2:Al2O3 ratio,
say 12 or 14, you can sometimes get a stain to make crystals of an
entirely different color with concentrations of 6 or 7% or so. I've
seen some of the blue stains develop pink/purple crystals floating in a
dark blue backgroung, for instance. I've also seen this with some of
the black stains.
Testing, testing, and more testing!
Paul Lewing, Seattle. Where I thought it was a wet winter when I saw
mold growing on the carpet in my truck. Well, now there are mushrooms
growing on the carpet in my truck!

Kingsley Weihe on thu 20 jul 00


Hi everyone,

I've recently joined the clayart community and love to read each day's
mail! So here's mine:

I'm wondering if anyone out there has used the Cerdec Degusa stains (or
the new mason Zirc-Cad-Sel stains) as a slip colorant at high fire (i.e.
cone 8 or higher iin oxidation). Does the color stay true, or does it
burn out? Any recommended percentages? Thanks

stolp pottery on mon 30 oct 00


Please can someone tell me what to mix with mason stains
to make it paintable on unfired white glaze? Or do I have
to fire the glazed ware first and then paint it on? Thanks.
Deborah Olson
Stolp Pottery
W8648 Sand Rd
Neillsville, Wi 54456
stolppottery@tds.net

Marcia Selsor on mon 30 oct 00


If you are trying to paint on tin glaze, spray some dilluted starch onto
the surface.
To mix mason stains, you can use a frit. Use the one in your glaze which
might be 3124 if you are using popular formulas. 3-4 parts frit to 1
part mason stain. This may vary. I noticed turquoise is very dry with
this amount so I have to beef up the frit.
Best wishes,
Marcia

stolp pottery wrote:
>
> Please can someone tell me what to mix with mason stains
> to make it paintable on unfired white glaze? Or do I have
> to fire the glazed ware first and then paint it on? Thanks.
> Deborah Olson
> Stolp Pottery
> W8648 Sand Rd
> Neillsville, Wi 54456
> stolppottery@tds.net
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.

--
Marcia Selsor
selsor@imt.net
http://www.imt.net/~mjbmls
http://www.imt.net/~mjbmls/spain99.html
http://www.silverhawk.com/ex99/selsor/welcome.html

Michelle Moody on mon 30 oct 00


I have used liquid spray starch (cheap) and some frit. The starch produced a
smooth line and had the added bonus of not stinking up the studio.

Please can someone tell me what to mix with mason stains
to make it paintable on unfired white glaze? Or do I have
to fire the glazed ware first and then paint it on? Thanks.
Deborah Olson
Stolp Pottery
W8648 Sand Rd
Neillsville, Wi 54456
stolppottery@tds.net

Bill Raymond on mon 30 oct 00


I use GB in two part stain to one part GB. Sometimes you might need a
little more or less GB depending on the stain. You'll need to test the ones
you're using. I've been doing this for around eight years, works great.
Josie
-----Original Message-----
From: Michelle Moody
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Date: Monday, October 30, 2000 3:52 PM
Subject: Re: mason stains


>I have used liquid spray starch (cheap) and some frit. The starch produced
a
>smooth line and had the added bonus of not stinking up the studio.
>
>Please can someone tell me what to mix with mason stains
>to make it paintable on unfired white glaze? Or do I have
>to fire the glazed ware first and then paint it on? Thanks.
>Deborah Olson
>Stolp Pottery
>W8648 Sand Rd
>Neillsville, Wi 54456
>stolppottery@tds.net
>
>___________________________________________________________________________
___
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Rod, Marian, and Holly Morris on mon 30 oct 00


>Please can someone tell me what to mix with mason stains
>to make it paintable on unfired white glaze? Or do I have
>to fire the glazed ware first and then paint it on? Thanks.

There are two questions here. First, to make it flow from the brush, add a
bit of glycerin or even dish soap to the paste you have made from the stain,
the flux, and water. Second, to make the mason stain glassy, instead of
refractory, add a bit of flux, such as gerstley borate or frit 3124 (even
some clear glaze, if it tests out OK).

I have used both the g.b. and the frit in amounts from 15% to 50%. Since I
am usually using the colorants on top of a majolica base, less flux is
needed since the base has lots of flux. It is just a matter of testing for
your particular purposes.

Normally, you would be applying colorants to unfired glaze. I think you
would have some real challenges trying to get the mason stains to stick on
fired glaze.

Marian in Michigan

Rhonda Oldland on wed 1 nov 00


I use the same clay body from the peice I want to stain and mix it with
water until it is like a thin glaze.I have used poreclain and stoneware
without any problems and I have also used poreclain slip ontop of stoneware.
Using a kitchen blender to to blend the clay ,water and stains together
seems to work best letting it stand for a day , blend again and pour into
old mason jars to store. Rhonda



At 06:15 10/30/00 -0500, you wrote:
>Please can someone tell me what to mix with mason stains
>to make it paintable on unfired white glaze? Or do I have
>to fire the glazed ware first and then paint it on? Thanks.
>Deborah Olson
>Stolp Pottery
>W8648 Sand Rd
>Neillsville, Wi 54456
>stolppottery@tds.net
>
>___________________________________________________________________________
___
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.
>
>

Leava Major on fri 2 feb 01


Due to the dh losing his job,my money for supplies
is nil or more nil than usual I should say.I have
an unexpected opportunity to present samples of
some items next weekend to a group of people for
possible orders.I need a teaspoon of 3-4 colors
of Mason Stains I don't have to do certain new
designs.I just can't order a quarter pound of each
right now.If anyone has yellow,pink,rose or
lavender and can spare a spoonful of each or
any,I'd be happy to send a spoonful of the colors
I have in exchange(I have brown,green and blue).I
think in a small ziploc bag in padded envy it'd
travel okay.....I need bright or pastel,I have
titanium white to dilute...Or will send one of my
killer lipbalms with cocoa and shea butter.......

I hope this does not violate a listrule
????.......
Leava<<<
--

Leava Major,Honeysuckle Hollow,Handcrafted
Pottery,Paper and Soaps
MARKERS...custom garden markers and signs
FRAGMENTS...mini image & word tiles for
stampers,collage artists and crafters
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumIndex?u=785087&a=9304438

SOAPTILES...handcrafted stoneware soapdishes
BUTTONS....custom stoneware buttons for the fiber
artist
WORKSHOPS in Central Oklahoma beginning January
2001

Maid O'Mud on wed 22 may 02


Hi All:

I just bought out a Ceramic store that was closing. Included was a =
number of mason stains - about a dozen different colours (numbers?). =
Can someone please direct me to a site where I could look up the =
colours?

Many TIA

Sam - Maid O'Mud Pottery
Melbourne, Ontario CANADA

"First, the clay told me what to do.
Then, I told the clay what to do.
Now, we co-operate."
sam 1994

http://www.ody.ca/~scuttell/

Jim Kasper on wed 22 may 02


Hi Sam,
Axner.com
Or exact URL below:

http://www.pottery-books.com/cgi-local/axner/loadpage.cgi?user_id=369555&fil
e=glazes/masonstains.html

Regards,
Jim Kasper

http://zafka.com

>Included was a number of mason stains - about a dozen >different colours
(numbers?). Can someone please direct >me to a site where I could look up
the colours?
> Sam - Maid O'Mud Pottery
> Melbourne, Ontario CANADA

Dave Gayman on wed 22 may 02


Primary is http://www.masoncolor.com/newfiles/ceramicstains.html

But you'll find color charts and numbers at Bailey (across 2 pages,
http://www.baileypottery.com/glazes/masonstains1.htm and
http://www.baileypottery.com/glazes/masonstains2.htm), Axner
(www.axner.com, enter store, go to stains under Glaze & Decoration), and
many other online sources of Mason stains, such as the Big Ceramic Store
(http://bigceramicstore.com/Supplies/Stains/stains.htm).

You'll find these and many others by simply typing 3 words into the address
bar of Internet Explorer, if you use that browser: mason ceramic stains.

Dave

At 07:05 PM 5/22/2002 -0400, you wrote:
>Hi All:
>
>I just bought out a Ceramic store that was closing. Included was a number
>of mason stains - about a dozen different colours (numbers?). Can someone
>please direct me to a site where I could look up the colours?

William Hendry on wed 22 may 02


Sam,

Mason has their complete catalog on the internet at www.masoncolor.com Click
on the ceramic stains tab and you should get all the info you need.

William
----- Original Message -----
From: "Maid O'Mud"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 7:05 PM
Subject: Mason Stains


Hi All:

I just bought out a Ceramic store that was closing. Included was a number
of mason stains - about a dozen different colours (numbers?). Can someone
please direct me to a site where I could look up the colours?

Many TIA

Sam - Maid O'Mud Pottery
Melbourne, Ontario CANADA

"First, the clay told me what to do.
Then, I told the clay what to do.
Now, we co-operate."
sam 1994

http://www.ody.ca/~scuttell/

____________________________________________________________________________
__
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Marianne Lombardo on wed 22 may 02


Sam;

Here is a link to Mason's colour charts:

http://www.masoncolor.com/newfiles/ceramicstains.html


Marianne

Steve Dalton on thu 23 may 02


on 5/22/02 3:05 PM, Maid O'Mud at scuttell@ODY.CA wrote:

> Included was a number of mason stains - about a dozen different colours
> (numbers?).

I would say grab a catalog from a supplier that carries Mason Stains, ie
A.R.T. or any others and cross reference the numbers. I've found some
sights don't list everything they have in stock.
--
Steve Dalton
Clear Creek Pottery
Snohomish, Wa
sdpotter@gte.net

julie milazzo on thu 12 jun 03


Great! I have a vat of opaque white glaze, and that's the one I planned to use! This might almost be easy! I'm also getting my website up within a few weeks (I have an appointment and everything!), so I can post photos of the pieces, and let people know what worked (and didn't).
My newfound identity crisis has led me into Austin powers type stuff. Worrisome, I know, but unless I start sporting a boufant (sorry about the spelling... way before my time), then we can start to worry. Oooh... and polyester. Lots of polyester... Jules

Craig Martell wrote:
Hi:

If you want to get a fair amount of milage and rich color with Mason
Stains, try using opacifiers in the glaze. I do this with both slips and
glazes and I've found that certain colors really benefit from the addition
of opacifiers. I use Ultrox and, or, Tin Oxide.

regards, Craig Martell Hopewell, Oregon

______________________________________________________________________________
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.

---------------------------------
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Free online calendar with sync to Outlook(TM).

Craig Martell on thu 12 jun 03


Hi:

If you want to get a fair amount of milage and rich color with Mason
Stains, try using opacifiers in the glaze. I do this with both slips and
glazes and I've found that certain colors really benefit from the addition
of opacifiers. I use Ultrox and, or, Tin Oxide.

regards, Craig Martell Hopewell, Oregon

Cristy on wed 21 apr 04


HI!

I'm getting really frustrated with the Mason Stains I just bought. I =
heard you can do a 50/50 mix with mason stains and Frit 3124? I haven't =
tried it yet and was wondering if anyone had any luck or advice. I also =
have a satiny clear glaze to put over them, but didn't know if it was a =
good idea to use that over the Frit mix.

So if anyone had any great ideas to share with a young potter just =
starting out, I would appreciate it a whole bunch. I'm itching to use =
these stains, but not in the destructive run to the sink to wash them =
off manner. =3D0)

Thanks!!

-Cristy
Lexington, Ky =20

Nick Molatore on thu 22 apr 04


The 50/50 mix with frit works fine, but my experience is that it should be
applied VERY thin, like a watercolor wash, not at all like a glaze or you
will get crawling.
-Nick

----- Original Message -----
From: "Cristy"
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2004 7:44 PM
Subject: Mason Stains


HI!

I'm getting really frustrated with the Mason Stains I just bought. I heard
you can do a 50/50 mix with mason stains and Frit 3124? I haven't tried it
yet and was wondering if anyone had any luck or advice. I also have a
satiny clear glaze to put over them, but didn't know if it was a good idea
to use that over the Frit mix.

So if anyone had any great ideas to share with a young potter just starting
out, I would appreciate it a whole bunch. I'm itching to use these stains,
but not in the destructive run to the sink to wash them off manner. =0)

Thanks!!

-Cristy
Lexington, Ky

Mayssan Farra on thu 22 apr 04


Hello Cristy;

Yes do add 50/50 frit and stain, and yes you can dip
it in clear glaze afterwards just make sure that your
glaze is clear enough and it is a glaze that does not
move otherwise the colors will move with it and the
image will get sistorted on vertical surfaces.

I actually add to the 50/50 mix some commercial
Majolica base glaze to help with the flowing of the
paint and also with the adherance of the glaze to the
stain, used to have the glaze fall off in drops or
just crawl badly off some areas that were heavy on the
stain.

I wish you luck and joy in this new journy.
Mayssan

=====

Mayssan Shora Farra

http://www.clayvillepottery.com





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Rebecca Pocai on thu 22 apr 04


What exactly are you trying to do with these?
Is the 50/50 mason stain frit formula for use as an
underglaze? And to what cone? They make a nice
underglaze at lower firing ranges but I think 50% frit
is a very high. Try adding stains to a reliable base
white underglaze (up to 10%). This makes your stain
last longer than using 50/50 formula you mentioned.
And with a reliable underglaze you can be fairly sure
it will stick, and not do anything unpredictible to
the piece you are underglazing. Most commercial,
powdered underglazes work well. Or if you have a good
white underglaze recipie you like try that first.

Most stains show their truest colors in oxidation
firing. Some will wash out or even disappear
completely in reduction firing. Avoid reds, some
greens (those that are not chrome based), and oranges
in reduction.

I have had great success mixing mason stains into my
favorite base glazes both cone 06 and cone 12 (no
greater than 10% stain). Though not all colors turn
out at high firing, such as reds and oranges (as
underglaze and glaze colorants.

Also remember that stains can be toxic too. Some like,
tin vanadium, should be used in small quantities as a
colorant. So as a general rule I don't use any more
than 5 to 10% stain unless I have done some research
on it's toxicity.

RPocai

--- Cristy wrote:
> HI!
>
> I'm getting really frustrated with the Mason Stains
> I just bought. I heard you can do a 50/50 mix with
> mason stains and Frit 3124? I haven't tried it yet
> and was wondering if anyone had any luck or advice.
> I also have a satiny clear glaze to put over them,
> but didn't know if it was a good idea to use that
> over the Frit mix.
>
> So if anyone had any great ideas to share with a
> young potter just starting out, I would appreciate
> it a whole bunch. I'm itching to use these stains,
> but not in the destructive run to the sink to wash
> them off manner. =0)
>
> Thanks!!
>
> -Cristy
> Lexington, Ky
>
>
______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change
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> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
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> reached at melpots@pclink.com.





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May Luk on fri 23 apr 04


Hiya;

I'm not the one who started the thread, but my decoration experience with
stains is such:-

I was doing decorations with stains. I put 2-3 coats for solid coverage. I
do very graphic designs. [For painterly look, I use slip] I just mixed stain
with water and put washes on greenware fired to cone 9 at the time. All the
stain colours came out fine even at such high temperature. But the glaze was
not "melting" well when I put clear glaze over it. Then somebody suggested
mixing 50% stain 50% glaze and some glycerin for suspension on greenware. I
tested 20 stains and they worked well. Because of the saturation of stains,
the glaze coverage wasn't ideal with some of them. So I always make sure I
touch up the stain part with more glaze.

I bisqued with the stain before glaze firing, so it's set and it doesn't
run, except heavy cobalt type stain.

I am sure I have used mason stains, but the UK supplier here rename the
product so I don't know which is which.

Lately, I'm using velvet underglaze and mixed a bit of stain to pump up the
colours as greens and orange burns out above cone 6] they flowed really
nicely on greenware. I had also mixed stain and slip and bits of powder
glaze and they are pretty much the same thing - I suspect. The colour is
weaker, of course, due to less percentage of stain.

I'm weary of the red and orange and yellow part that touches food. I have
contacted Amaco and I haven't quite got the answer yet. The technical person
never returned my email. This reminds me I have to follow up.

I read digitalfire and Hamer's dictionary about colours and stains and I'm
getting better understanding on why glaze reacts on top of stains.

Have a nice day
May
London, UK
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
From Rebecca:
What exactly are you trying to do with these?
Is the 50/50 mason stain frit formula for use as an
underglaze? And to what cone? They make a nice
underglaze at lower firing ranges but I think 50% frit
is a very high. Try adding stains to a reliable base
white underglaze (up to 10%).....

Snail Scott on fri 23 apr 04


At 10:44 PM 4/21/04 -0400, you wrote:
>...Mason Stains...I heard you can do a 50/50 mix with mason stains and
Frit 3124?


That will work. It works better with Gerstley Borate,
(c'est la vie) but 3124 or 3134 does adequately. If
you are doing this to make a paint-on colorant for
bisque, to glaze over, I'd use less frit and add a
smidge of calcined clay. The exact proportions don't
matter a lot.

A proper engobe recipe will give you more control, so
consider testing a few, but the 'seat-of-the-pants'
method you mentioned is a pretty good start.

-Snail Scott
still in Reno, NV USA

Ivor and Olive Lewis on sat 24 apr 04


Dear Cristy in Lexington,
I would be wary about using a frit if this is underglaze decoration on
leather hard clay.
some frits will melt at bisque temperatures. this seals the surface
and prevents the build up of a good layer of glaze because capillary
activity is thwarted. The result after glost firing are bare unglazed
areas on the decoration.
Best regards,
Ivor Lewis. Redhill, South Australia

Throw like a Butterfly, Fire like a Bee

kenneth dec on sun 31 oct 04


Hello All,

I am new to formulating my own glazes; I just got my copy of "Mastering =
Cone 6 Glazes"; THANK YOU to John Hesselberth and Ron Roy, from a kid =
that, 25 years ago, hid in the art studio when I should have been in =
physics or chemistry class. (Is it really possible to achieve the effect =
of Waterfall Brown in an electric kiln? No way!)

Meanwhile, I am muddling along with expensive commercial glazes. I fire =
to cone 6 in an electric kiln, and I use Sheffield's W1A white =
stoneware, and their T6S for large pieces. I am at the point (2 =BD =
years into my craft) that I want to get my feet wet (pun alert) with a =
glaze of my own. I decided to try mixing Mason stains into my favorite =
base: Opulence clear gloss.

My question: How much stain should be added to the base to achieve the =
closest possible match to the Mason stain color chart? I have been =
experimenting with small batches, and I have wasted too much time, =
money, and material. In my tiny test batches, I have achieved results =
that are so thick it flakes off after firing. I admit I have not kept =
records; I simply added a teaspoon or two of stain to about 8 oz of the =
Opulence. Obviously, I don't know what the heck I'm doing! What I'd like =
to achieve is the Mason Sapphire Blue in a dipping formula using the =
Opulence as a base. I need at least 2 gallons. I just invested in 25# of =
dry Opulence and (gulp) 1# of Mason stain Sapphire. ($$$$) I don't want =
to mess this up.

Also, would it benefit the glaze to add rutile? Bentonite?

Thank you in advance for your help. I have many more questions; look =
forward to my laughably na=EFve posts in the future.

Best,

Melissa Jeswald Dec

Whose Studio Has No Name but I am open to suggestions.

In gorgeous Eastern MA where the foliage has peaked,

And people with Nothing Better To Do are screaming about some stupid =
ball game.

Not me; thank God for clay.

k.dec@comcast.net

Anne Wellings on mon 1 nov 04


On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 04:01:27 -0500, kenneth dec wrote:

>
>My question: How much stain should be added to the base to achieve the
closest possible match to the Mason stain color chart? >

I add 10% in tests and get a good result, and I think that is what Mason
recommends to get something like the color in the chart..... However, I
often go for a smaller percentage once I see what 10% is like, though this
varies with the particular color.


>Also, would it benefit the glaze to add rutile? Bentonite?

I have tried adding 6% rutile to a glaze with 10% Mason stain, with the
hopes of getting both a vivid color and variegation. I got an interesting
result, and the variegation I wanted, but lost the vivid color and got
something much more bleached out than I'd hoped for. I then tried a smaller
percentage of rutile, like 3%, and got something completely uninteresting,
with no variegation and a dulling of the color. I do see possibilities
here, though, if enough testing with different colors and percentages was
done.

Anne
>

Paul Lewing on mon 1 nov 04


on 11/1/04 12:09 AM, Anne Wellings at sunrisepots@JUNO.COM wrote:

> I have tried adding 6% rutile to a glaze with 10% Mason stain, with the
> hopes of getting both a vivid color and variegation. I got an interesting
> result, and the variegation I wanted, but lost the vivid color and got
> something much more bleached out than I'd hoped for.
This is because the titanium in rutile (about 92%) makes it a powerful
opacifier. To get vivid colors from stains, you need to have no opacifier.
Another alternative might be to add the rutile as granular rutile, rather
than powdered rutile. You might then get the vivid color in between the
rutile effects.
Paul Lewing, Seattle

Mike Gordon on tue 2 nov 04


On Nov 1, 2004, at 7:51 PM, Paul Lewing wrote:
Another alternative might be to add the rutile as granular rutile,
rather
than powdered rutile. You might then get the vivid color in between the
rutile effects.
Paul Lewing, Seattle
Paul,
Can you explain the difference between granular and powdered rutile? I
have some in my studio but I thought it would react like granular
manganese, ( black specks ). Will granular rutile react the same?
Thanks Mike Gordon

Paul Lewing on tue 2 nov 04


on 11/2/04 8:57 AM, Mike Gordon at clayart@EARTHLINK.NET wrote:

> Can you explain the difference between granular and powdered rutile? I
> have some in my studio but I thought it would react like granular
> manganese, ( black specks ). Will granular rutile react the same?
Pretty much. It seems to melt into the glaze a bit more than granular
manganese, in my experience. The color is different, though. Whereas the
manganese is black, the rutile is more brown or tan, and a bit streakier.
Rutile is a crystal, so the real difference between powdered and granular is
simply particle size, dependent on how finely it's been ground.
Paul Lewing, Seattle

Anne Wellings on wed 3 nov 04


Thanks, Paul, that sounds worth trying. Otherwise, would it work to just
add a higher percentage of the stain along with the 6% rutile? (That would
get expensive, though maybe worth it for special cases.)

Anne Wellings
Olympia, WA

On Mon, 1 Nov 2004 19:51:44 -0800, Paul Lewing
wrote:

>on 11/1/04 12:09 AM, Anne Wellings at sunrisepots@JUNO.COM wrote:
>
>> I have tried adding 6% rutile to a glaze with 10% Mason stain, with the
>> hopes of getting both a vivid color and variegation. I got an interesting
>> result, and the variegation I wanted, but lost the vivid color and got
>> something much more bleached out than I'd hoped for.
>This is because the titanium in rutile (about 92%) makes it a powerful
>opacifier. To get vivid colors from stains, you need to have no opacifier.
>Another alternative might be to add the rutile as granular rutile, rather
>than powdered rutile. You might then get the vivid color in between the
>rutile effects.
>Paul Lewing, Seattle

Ron Roy on wed 3 nov 04


Sounds like a clear glaze with stain over rutile opacified glaze might
solve the problem - RR


>> I have tried adding 6% rutile to a glaze with 10% Mason stain, with the
>> hopes of getting both a vivid color and variegation. I got an interesting
>> result, and the variegation I wanted, but lost the vivid color and got
>> something much more bleached out than I'd hoped for.
>This is because the titanium in rutile (about 92%) makes it a powerful
>opacifier. To get vivid colors from stains, you need to have no opacifier.
>Another alternative might be to add the rutile as granular rutile, rather
>than powdered rutile. You might then get the vivid color in between the
>rutile effects.

Ron Roy
RR#4
15084 Little Lake Road
Brighton, Ontario
Canada
K0K 1H0
Phone: 613-475-9544
Fax: 613-475-3513

Paul Lewing on wed 3 nov 04


on 11/2/04 10:04 PM, Anne Wellings at sunrisepots@JUNO.COM wrote:

> that sounds worth trying. Otherwise, would it work to just
> add a higher percentage of the stain along with the 6% rutile? (That would
> get expensive, though maybe worth it for special cases.)

In my experience, adding more than about 10% of stain is a waste. The color
does not get any more intense. But maybe in the case of an opacified glaze,
it would. Try it and let us know.
Paul Lewing, Seattle

david moynihan on mon 10 apr 06


Hello all,
I have downsized my studio and filled my shelves,
rafters cracks and crevices....
I still have stains left (aprox 500lbs). They are
Mason Stains that have been in tupperware or origional
containers. I have them at $10/lb. min 5lbs. plus shipping
or you pick up. There are some fun ones on the list. If
you are interested please send me a message off list.
I also have spectrum blue, green, and yellow that are
not listed.
Thanks for the space,
david in London,Ontario, Canada N6J 3R5

6001 Alpine rose 25 Lbs. available
6026 Lobster 40
6027 Tangerine 5
6069 Dark Corel 10
6111 Spice Brown 30
6124 Chocolate Brown 30
6129 Golden Ambrosia 90
6124 Chocolate Brown 30
6236 Chartreuse 30
6242 Bermuda Green 25
6244 Deep Sea Green 6
6280 Avocado 5
6300 Mazerine Blue 5
6305 Teal blue 20
6315 Zir Van Blue 25
6324 Violet 15
6331 Orchid 20
6343 Mediterranean Blue 5
6386 Navy Blue 5
6387 Mulberry 10
6406 Buttercup yellow 25
6407 Marigold 15
6528 Charcoal Grey 15
6530 Silver Grey 5
6650 Black (Cobalt free) 3
6768 White 20

P.S. I also have 100 lbs of Veegum
free for pick up in origional
container!

mitch lyons on thu 11 may 06


A few years ago I was giving a Clay Printing Workshop at
Haystack and sent a supply list to my students which included
Mason Stains. Some of them come up with cement colors that they
purchased from Sears. We used them anyway and they worked for
printing, and firing the slab.
Mitch Lyons

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Johanna San Inocencio on thu 19 jan 12


I have three questions that I hope the Clayart Collective Mind can =3D
answer:

1. When making glazes with stains, some of the stains should not be used =
=3D
in a glaze with zinc. does that also apply to using a glaze with mason =3D
stains in proximity to another glaze containing zinc?=3D20
2. are there any issues with using a mason stain containing tin/chrome =3D
next to another glaze containing either oxide not in a fritted stain?
3. Can stains containing cadmium or vanadium be used on surfaces that =3D
may come in contact with food, or should they be avoided the same way as =
=3D
the natural oxides?

When I say next to, I mean on the same vessel in cuerda seca, not just =3D
next to each other in the firing.

Johanna

Birgit Wright on thu 19 jan 12


Hello Johanna=3D3B My experience with questions 1&2 are=3D2C Yes to #1=3D=
2C sp=3D
ecifically some greens and=3D2C Yes to #2. regarding a black underglaze. Re=
ga=3D
rding #3 I have checked out the encapsulated cadmium and gotten a positive =
=3D
go ahead using ^6 and a moderate percentage of stain=3D2C but if you go =
to=3D
FAQ's on the mason stain website http://www.masoncolor.com/faq.htm =3D2C =
th=3D
ey have a lot of answers. and if you call their 1-800 # and ask for tech. =
=3D
support they are very helpful. I had a red cup with tested at=3D2C http:=
//=3D
www.bsclab.com/=3D2C Not that costly. You can see the sample at=3D2C htt=
p://=3D
www.birgitspots.blogspot.com/ =3D2C at the bottom of the page. Cheers=3D2=
C Bi=3D
rgit Wright=3D20

> Date: Thu=3D2C 19 Jan 2012 09:11:13 -0600
> From: johannasan@FRONTIERNET.NET
> Subject: mason stains
> To: Clayart@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>=3D20
> I have three questions that I hope the Clayart Collective Mind can answer=
=3D
:
>=3D20
> 1. When making glazes with stains=3D2C some of the stains should not be u=
se=3D
d in a glaze with zinc. does that also apply to using a glaze with mason st=
=3D
ains in proximity to another glaze containing zinc?=3D20
> 2. are there any issues with using a mason stain containing tin/chrome ne=
=3D
xt to another glaze containing either oxide not in a fritted stain?
> 3. Can stains containing cadmium or vanadium be used on surfaces that may=
=3D
come in contact with food=3D2C or should they be avoided the same way as t=
he=3D
natural oxides?
>=3D20
> When I say next to=3D2C I mean on the same vessel in cuerda seca=3D2C not=
jus=3D
t next to each other in the firing.
>=3D20
> Johanna

=3D