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cone 6 glazes

updated mon 3 may 10

 

tom gray on tue 26 mar 96

To all ^6 reduction potters (by choice or not)

For 2 years I struggled with this concept & finally gave up. The fuel savings
(?) were not worth the effort. The results don't compare to ^10. I agree with
Peter Pinnell- sell another mug to pay for the difference in firing costs.

You will find here 3 recipes that I found to be the most successful out of
several dozen tests.

Shino
neph. sy. 40
spodumene 40
epk 10
soda ash 10

Spodumene
neph. sy. 45
epk 10
whiting 5
dolomite 10
spodumene* 20
soda ash 5
ultrox 5

add .75 cobalt carb. for blue
this matte glaze breaks from rust to white (to blue w/ cob.)
* I used chemical grade at the time- now I would probably test spod.LM.
OR- replace spod. w/ soda feldspar & add redart for color

Clear base
gertsley borate 20
wollastonite 10
neph. sy. 30
epk 10
flint (325 mesh) 30

add- 10% iron for temmoku
or- 2% tin oxide & 1% copper carb. for red

Due to the lower sintering point of ^6 glazes- you have to start reduction
fairly early- at least by stoneware standards. Try ^010 as a starting point & go
from there. I also used a clay body that had a higher iron content than my
present ^10 body- it seemed to make a difference.
Good luck!

After 2 yrs. of firing everything we made to ^6 reduction I decided to switch to
^10. The material list for formulating glazes is less extensive & possibly less
expensive. There has been a WHOLE LOT more research @ ^10. For the most part -
glazes do come out richer @ ^10 although- I have yet to find a matte blue that
compares to my old ^6 matte blue!

Tom Gray
Seagrove, N.C.

CRoeder1@aol.com on tue 26 mar 96

Tom,

Thanks for the recipes, and for your candid response.

It may turn out that after a few years of experimentation, that we'll go back
to cone 9/10, but I have respect for the director of the ceramics program at
the school, and I want to at least give it my best effort. (If I owned my own
reduction kiln, I'd be doing cone 10 in a heartbeat!)

I have heard from a few (very few) who do cone 6 reduction, and now have some
new recipes to try.

Thanks again, Tom, and thanks to all of you on Clayart who have responded.

Candice Roeder

LBlos72758@aol.com on mon 1 apr 96

Dear Candice,

Was that Tom that expressed pity for the cone 6 firer? Oh well, I like cone
6. A full six with a seven at 1:00, to be precise. There are a couple of
glazes from John Kenney's book that I used for copper reds and found them
very interesting. No. 25, rated at cone 8 - 12, does well at cone 6 - less
runny. With copper carbonate 1 and 1/2 % and Tin at 1%, it gives a
dependable, full, flambe. The base is Potash feldspar 26.5, Whiting 6.5,
wollastonite 5, BaCO3 5, ZnO 2.5, ball clay (om-4) 12, Borax 13, soda ash
2.5, silica 27. No. 21, bristol glaze with Tin Oxide 2% and copper carbonate
1-2% gives a soft, smooth, red. The base is ZnO 7, whiting 10, feldspar 68 (
I'm not sure which I used F-4 or Custer), EPK 8, silica 7. This glaze is
rated at 4-8. I used a fast cool when I fired these and all reds.

Linda
Ithaca, NY

Tony Hansen on fri 20 sep 96

I've seen a lot of requests for cone 6 glazes.
I'd like to invite anyone interested to visit the web page at:

http://digitalfire.com/magic/articles/cone6.htm

This page describes in detail one cone 6 glaze recipe. My philosophy is
understand one and know how to control its color, character, melting
temp, expansion, etc. rather than fight with 50 you don't understand and
can't control. I'd really appreciate feedback on it, you can respond
right on the web page and I'll change the article if appropriate.

--
Tony Hansen, IMC - Pulishers of INSIGHT, FORESIGHT, Magic of Fire
134 Upland Dr., Medicine Hat, Alta T1A 3N7 Canada
Phone:403-527-2826 FAX:527-7441 email: thansen@mlc.awinc.com
web: http://digitalfire.com/imc.html

jessica sletten on wed 21 jan 98

hi! had some requests for randy's green and tea dust.
as always, use the necessary precautions (mask, etc.)

randy's green

kona f spar 350
potash spar 417.5
om 4 ball clay 200
flint 320
strontium 250
whiting 175
dolomite 121.5

tin oxide 73.36
copper carb 110.04

numbers add up kind of weird, but it works. this is actually a cone
9-10 glaze but i've fired it from cone 4 (satiny matt) to cone 6
(opaque glossy). it's a dark, forest green. doesn't brush worth a
damn but i'm now trying some cmc to improve this. i got this glaze
from my instructor, David Nelson, at a workshop in tennessee. my fave
green glaze. there are a lot of icky ones out there (in my humble
opinion).


tea dust

potash feldspar 23.0
neph sye 23.0
epk 14.0
flint 5.0
whiting 10.0

red iron ox. 5.0
manganese diox. 5.0
cobalt carb. 5.0
rutile 5.0
talc 5.0

from chappel's book. nice liner glaze. good for overdipping on rims
and such. it's a satiny, gunmetal black. kind of hard to describe.
i've had problems with it crawling so i use it pretty thin.

note to debra.yap@gsa.gov : i'm new at this and i'm not sure your
whole message made it to me. there was a little paperclip icon i
can't figure out. what's randy's red?

i also like the idea of knowing where folks are located.

jsletten@fuse.net
in the currently somewhat cold, gray and dreary city of cincinnati

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Craig Martell on thu 22 jan 98

At 10:27 AM 1/21/98 EST, Jessica wrote:
>----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>hi! had some requests for randy's green and tea dust.
>as always, use the necessary precautions (mask, etc.)

>tea dust
>
>potash feldspar 23.0
>neph sye 23.0
>epk 14.0
>flint 5.0
>whiting 10.0
>
> red iron ox. 5.0
> manganese diox. 5.0
> cobalt carb. 5.0
> rutile 5.0
> talc 5.0
>
>from chappel's book. nice liner glaze.

Hi:

What got me going on this one was your comment on the glaze being a nice
liner. So, with about 20% colorant addition I thought it might be a good
idea to look at this one. I calculated the base, without the colorants and
I added the Talc into the base formula as it is contributing magnesia and
silica to the glaze. This one is actually more of a cone 10 formula. The
alumina and silica are in the cone 10 limit range. The alumina is actually
OVER the limit for a cone 10 glaze and may be retarding fusion in this one,
especially when fired to a lower cone, which is not a good thing with all
the colorants, 10% of which can be considered potentially problematic. The
glaze has sufficient silica to be durable. The calculated expansion is a
bit on the high side which would indicate a potential crazing problem, also
not good with all the heavy metal. My feeling is that this glaze should not
be used as a liner, especially at cone 6. If you must use it as a liner,
have it tested in a lab for colorant leaching.

A thought I had about these dark to black glazes with lots of manganese and
cobalt is not to accept someone elses colorant percentages. Try lowering
them as much as you can while still maintaining the color that you want. 5%
is a King's ransom in cobalt, and you could surely use less. I used to use
a black cone 10 glaze that had 3% and I was able to lower it to 1.75 without
any loss in intensity. Try getting the manganese down as well.

I'll post the glaze formula below. I retotaled it to 100% from 80% which was
what it totaled to with out the colorants. This is why the percentages are a
bit higher......Craig Martell-Polk county, Oregon, USA

Teadust-I don't know what the recommended cone is-I would say cone 9-10
CUSTER FELDSPAR 28.75 CaO 0.46*
NEPHELINE SYENITE 28.75 MgO 0.18*
WHITING 12.50 K2O 0.16*
TALC 6.25 Na2O 0.21*
EPK KAOLIN 17.50 Fe2O3 0.00
SILICA 6.25 TiO2 0.00
======== Al2O3 0.63
100.00 SiO2 3.24
Cost/kg 0.14
Si:Al 5.15
SiB:Al 5.15
Expan 7.77

Nunnelln on sun 22 mar 98

Hi, we Ceramics students (UNM) are looking for some really good cone 6 glazes
- does anyone know of some tried-and-true beauties? Nancy

Kathy Katz-Hall on tue 19 jan 99

Hello I am new to Clayart and am a self taught studio potter. Last year I
bought a used electric kiln and have been experimenting with glazes. I
have no formal training so the chemistry is beyond me. I have had some
sucess with several glazes many more failures. Would love to try some
greens, olive, sea, mint, dark anything. I do mostly functional ware with
a smattering of non-functional.

Thanks for your help.
Kathy in Philly
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Bill Williams on tue 19 jan 99

Kathy: Seems like I repeat this a lot. I have only been doing work on the
wheel for 3 years, so compared to everyone else, I don't have much to offer.
My husband was a secondary art instructor for 25 years, so I have built-in
help, even tho his love is painting, not pottery. Anyway, when I decided to
start experimenting with glazes, I would go to every pottery studio I could
find and ask questions. The assistance varied, but the one thing I heard
most often was that I need to get the book called "The Potter's Complete
Book of Clay and Glazes" by James Chappell. You don't have to be into the
chemistry of glazes to use the book because most of it is pretty straight
forward and easy to understand. Connie
-----Original Message-----
From: Kathy Katz-Hall
To: CLAYART@LSV.UKY.EDU
Date: Monday, January 18, 1999 11:18 PM
Subject: Cone 6 glazes


>----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>Hello I am new to Clayart and am a self taught studio potter. Last year I
>bought a used electric kiln and have been experimenting with glazes. I
>have no formal training so the chemistry is beyond me. I have had some
>sucess with several glazes many more failures. Would love to try some
>greens, olive, sea, mint, dark anything. I do mostly functional ware with
>a smattering of non-functional.
>
>Thanks for your help.
>Kathy in Philly
>___________________________________________________________________
>You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
>Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
>or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
>

Potterman on tue 19 jan 99


-----Original Message-----
From: Kathy Katz-Hall
To: CLAYART@LSV.UKY.EDU
Date: Monday, January 18, 1999 9:18 PM
Subject: Cone 6 glazes


>----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>Hello I am new to Clayart and am a self taught studio potter. Last year I
>bought a used electric kiln and have been experimenting with glazes. I
>have no formal training so the chemistry is beyond me. I have had some
>sucess with several glazes many more failures. Would love to try some
>greens, olive, sea, mint, dark anything. I do mostly functional ware with
>a smattering of non-functional.
>
>Thanks for your help.
>Kathy in Philly
>___________________________________________________________________
>You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
>Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
>or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
>Kathy,
Richard Zakin's "Electric Kiln Ceramics" is a must for anyone firing with
electric kilns. It reads easy and is full of great glaze recipes. I've
tested nearly all his cone 6 recipes with success, includes greens, mints,
and beautiful browns/ambers. It is not an expensive book and you may be
able to find it at a local library.
Karsten in Kansas City where it has been warm and sunny most of the
winter so far.

jillataylor on thu 11 feb 99


Dear Clayarters:

Does anyone know about a high alkiline glaze called Reynolds Gold? It has
lithium in in and sometimes makes a nice metallic glaze, however, I haven't =
used
it for that in some time. I tried an experiment with it and found it makes =
a
nice flux saturated turquoise matt (when it isn't running off the pot) My
problem is it has caused a lot of dunting/shivering of the clay on some of =
my
best pieces ever. It only did this after the large batch of glaze had been
around a while. I suspect that some of the ingredients went into solution
leaving the lithium, which is famous for this problem, in higher =
concentration
than is safe. My question, do I have to just throw away the pots? Is there=
a
remedy. I tried a clear glaze over the whole thing, in an attempt to =
=22glue=22 the
glaze back on. It didn't work. When enough copper goes into this glaze it =
can
even be a gun metal black. I would appreciate any advice you might be able =
to
give. I love the glaze because it can make a piece look wonderfully old. =
You
can see an example of it at
http://www.fortunecity.com/victorian/hurst/321/chalice.html On the left you=
can
see where the clay body is coming through.

Thanks all.
Jill

Sharon Miranda on fri 7 may 99

Ok, here there are:

Pinnell strontium Matt glaze, ^6 ox.

lithium carb 1.
strontium carb 20.
neph sye 60.
ball clay 10.
flint 9.

white: titanium diox 5.
weathered bronze green: titanium diox. 5., copper carb 5.
periwinkle blue: cobalt carb 0.15, copper carb 4.
dark mottled green: copper carb 8.
cream/tan: rutile 6.
carcoal: manganese diox. 2., copper carb 5.

apply thickly. needs to go to true cone 6 (originally was a cone 9
recipe). Soak at the end of firing and fire down.
I have found some teeny pinholes in this glaze which are hard to get rid
of. To avoid them, try smoothing over the glaze w/ a wet sponge.


Metallic black, cone 6 ox

spodumene 50
gerst. bor 25
flint 25
black iron ox 10
cobalt ox 2
copper carb 4

This is a gorgeous black with mottled silver effects. Tends to run at cone
6. Make sure you have a good foot on the piece.

Floating blue cone 6 ox.

neph sye 47.3
gerstely borate 27.
silica 20.3
kaolin 5.4
red iron ox 2
cobatl carb 1
rutile 4
bentonite 2

This glaze has been around the bend a few million times, must have been
posted here on clayart many times. Its a glossy tan background with lots
of blue
floating. It's an absolutely reliable glaze, doesn't run, pinhole etc. you
can't go wrong with it.

Finally: here is a glaze from Val Cushing's handbook

VC "71"

Custer Spar 40
frit 3124 9
whiting 16
talc 9
epk 10
flint 16

Val's comments: wonderful surface. Really sensuous smooth satin matt. Kas
a kind of glow like looking at a pearl. All the colors keep this same
character, a gorgeous base glaze.

And it worked almost like that for me, too.! It was more glossy than matt,
but my kiln overfired somewhat in this test firing.

Enjoy these glazes, and please send me a cone 6 fat, sensuous, majolica
glaze!

Sharon Miranda

Michele Hoskin on sat 8 may 99


Hi Sharon.

Recently you asked if there was interest in Pete Pinnell's weathered bronze
>green and periwinkle, as well as floating blue and metallic black. Many
of us "cone 6ers" are always looking for new recipes. Please post these.
It would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks,
Michele Hoskin
Toronto

Celia Littlecreek on sun 4 nov 01


Lorri Burlingham, I tried sending glazes recipes off line, but I must =
have typed in your email addres incorrectly. Will you please resend.
Celia, LittlecreeksUniques
littlec@paulbunyan.net

Janis Young on tue 13 aug 02


I am tempted to get both Cone 6 glaze books after all
I've read here, but I only have ^10 clay. What would
happen if I fired it only to ^6?

Janis

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Snail Scott on tue 13 aug 02


At 11:26 AM 8/13/02 -0700, you wrote:
>I am tempted to get both Cone 6 glaze books after all
>I've read here, but I only have ^10 clay. What would
>happen if I fired it only to ^6?
>

It will probably be too underfired to make the best
functional ware, though some people do it anyway. (I
wouldn't.) It's also not good for outdoor sculpture.
It may be weak, absorbent, and not frostproof. Don't
let a few (admittedly good) books lure you away from
^10 if you are using that temperature for real reasons.
(If you don't have a real reason, then maybe get some
^6 clay to see if you like that temperature better.)
Pick your temperature, and work with materials that
suit it. Don't try to get materials to do something
they're not appropriate for. Your time and money can
be better spent.

-Snail

Shirley Tschannen on tue 13 aug 02


Hi Janis, What might happen is the clay would not "vitrefy" and
wouldn't be as sturdy a piece. Also, it wouldn't accept the glaze
quite right. All of this depends on whats in your clay......and as we
have all found out.....that information is not readily available,
presuming that you have prepared clay from a supplier.
Someone correct me if this isn't the right info.

ray found on tue 13 aug 02


B-mix cone 10 works pretty much the same as B-mix cone 5 at around ^5-6,
I buy the ^6 anyways, but I am not so sure that they are really
different

-----Original Message-----
From: Ceramic Arts Discussion List [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On
Behalf Of Janis Young
Sent: Tuesday, August 13, 2002 11:26 AM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Cone 6 Glazes

I am tempted to get both Cone 6 glaze books after all
I've read here, but I only have ^10 clay. What would
happen if I fired it only to ^6?

Janis

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______
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Ron Roy on fri 16 aug 02


Probably the clay will leak - not be vitrified - although - with some clay
companies it is possible it would be sevicable - you can test the clay at 6
to see if it will be tight enough - but why not get some cone 6 clay?

RR


>I am tempted to get both Cone 6 glaze books after all
>I've read here, but I only have ^10 clay. What would
>happen if I fired it only to ^6?
>
>Janis

Ron Roy
RR#4
15084 Little Lake Road
Brighton, Ontario
Canada
K0K 1H0
Phone: 613-475-9544
Fax: 613-475-3513

Michael Schaugaard on sat 17 aug 02


Janis,

Is there a farm supply near you? If there is I bet you could get them to
bring you a 50# bag of powder clay that you could mix. It would be on their
time line, but I bet you could get it that way.

If not that, using freight on board (FOB) for the trailway or grayhound bus
might be another solution.

For what it's worth,

Michael

-----Original Message-----
From: Ceramic Arts Discussion List [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On
Behalf Of Janis Young
Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2002 12:52 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Cone 6 Glazes


Because I am too cheap, not to pay for the clay but to
pay for getting it shipped to me. I will get some ^6
clay eventually but in the meantime I am just going to
play with some ^10 clay at ^6. I am new at this so I
have nothing to lose.

Besides, your book arrived in the mail yesterday and I
read the whole thing last night, so I am dying to try
out some of these beautiful glazes. And the saki
jars--how do you get them to neck in so abruptly
without collapsing?

Janis


--- Ron Roy wrote:
> Probably the clay will leak - not be vitrified -
> although - with some clay
> companies it is possible it would be sevicable - you
> can test the clay at 6
> to see if it will be tight enough - but why not get
> some cone 6 clay?
>
> RR
>
>
> >I am tempted to get both Cone 6 glaze books after
> all
> >I've read here, but I only have ^10 clay. What
> would
> >happen if I fired it only to ^6?
> >
> >Janis
>
> Ron Roy
> RR#4
> 15084 Little Lake Road
> Brighton, Ontario
> Canada
> K0K 1H0
> Phone: 613-475-9544
> Fax: 613-475-3513
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change
> your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
> reached at melpots@pclink.com.


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Ron Roy on sat 17 aug 02


Hi Janis,

The pots may leak - just so you know.

The trick to making the tops on those saki jars - Learn to throw fast so
the clay does not get too soft and weak. Don't thin the top clay too much -
so it says workable - don't dribble water on that top clay when throwing
the pot - keep it as dry as possible - when you start throwing the top in
keep your inside finger under the whole top so it is supported - as you
bring the clay in it will thicken so thin it as needed.

Fast throwing is the key to many forms - if you can't throw a 6 " cylinder
- even walled - with three pulls - then you need more practice. I say one
pull and cut the cylinder in half - if the walls aren't even then do it
till they are. Next is two pulls till you can get even walls - it's about
learning to walk before you run sort of thing.

RR

>Because I am too cheap, not to pay for the clay but to
>pay for getting it shipped to me. I will get some ^6
>clay eventually but in the meantime I am just going to
>play with some ^10 clay at ^6. I am new at this so I
>have nothing to lose.
>
>Besides, your book arrived in the mail yesterday and I
>read the whole thing last night, so I am dying to try
>out some of these beautiful glazes. And the saki
>jars--how do you get them to neck in so abruptly
>without collapsing?
>
>Janis

Ron Roy
RR#4
15084 Little Lake Road
Brighton, Ontario
Canada
K0K 1H0
Phone: 613-475-9544
Fax: 613-475-3513

Janis Young on sat 17 aug 02


Because I am too cheap, not to pay for the clay but to
pay for getting it shipped to me. I will get some ^6
clay eventually but in the meantime I am just going to
play with some ^10 clay at ^6. I am new at this so I
have nothing to lose.

Besides, your book arrived in the mail yesterday and I
read the whole thing last night, so I am dying to try
out some of these beautiful glazes. And the saki
jars--how do you get them to neck in so abruptly
without collapsing?

Janis


--- Ron Roy wrote:
> Probably the clay will leak - not be vitrified -
> although - with some clay
> companies it is possible it would be sevicable - you
> can test the clay at 6
> to see if it will be tight enough - but why not get
> some cone 6 clay?
>
> RR
>
>
> >I am tempted to get both Cone 6 glaze books after
> all
> >I've read here, but I only have ^10 clay. What
> would
> >happen if I fired it only to ^6?
> >
> >Janis
>
> Ron Roy
> RR#4
> 15084 Little Lake Road
> Brighton, Ontario
> Canada
> K0K 1H0
> Phone: 613-475-9544
> Fax: 613-475-3513
>
>
______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change
> your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be
> reached at melpots@pclink.com.


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Marianne Lombardo on sun 18 aug 02


Janis

Re the Saki bottles. I saw some of them when Ron Roy did a workshop out my
way. What a surprise. They are much smaller than the photos make them
appear! Only maybe 5" high.

Marianne

> out some of these beautiful glazes. And the saki
> jars--how do you get them to neck in so abruptly
> without collapsing?

James Bowen on tue 8 apr 03


Somewhere in my computer is a scan of the Iron Red glazes.
Shall I send an image to you? The library copied it for me
from their micro film collection.


"In a recently published letter to a US senator, Assistant
Attorney General Daniel Bryant said Americans who borrowed
library books automatically surrendered their right to
privacy. "
Guardian Newspapers Limited

Tony Hansen on tue 8 apr 03


For samples of iron red look here:
http://digitalfire.com/gerstleyborate/recipes/ironreds.shtml

> Somewhere in my computer is a scan of the Iron Red glazes.
> Shall I send an image to you? The library copied it for me
> from their micro film collection.


========
Tony Hansen

Allyson May on thu 25 sep 03


Dear Elizabeth,

I am currently working through Ron and John's book on cone 6 glazes and =
it is a great source of information. There are glaze recipes in the =
book which are fabulous. You will still need to test them on your clay =
body with your particular kiln and firing schedule. However, the best =
thing about this book is that it provides great information as well as =
starting points for developing your own glazes. I tried working with =
other books like Clays And Glazes For The Potter; Whoosh! Right over my =
head with too much technical information! Ron and John's book is easy =
to read and doesn't bog you down with technical stuff. After reading =
their book I was able to go back to the others and understand much more =
than I had the first time. My suggestion: get their book, read it, test =
some glazes, and get excited about glaze development!! The time you =
spend will be rewarded with increased knowledge and beautiful pots!

Allyson May
Stoney Creek Pottery
Bloomington, IN

Lily Krakowski on thu 25 sep 03


Elizabeth:

John/Ron's book has recipes, as does Michael Bailey's. Clay Times publishes
some all the time, and PMI does when an article relates to them.
A number of other books include c.6 glazes in their compendia. In 1984 or
1985 Ceramics Monthly published "The Glazes of Hobart Cowles" c.5 (which
means they will work at c. 6 with very slight modification, if any, in 4
installments. Berhrens has glazes that will work fine.

The one and everlasting caution about older sources is that they will/may
include barium--for which I substitute strontium--and some contain lead.
(Forget them totally.)

I suspect you read "formulate" as "calculate". No. These are like
cookbooks--so much this, so much that...


Lili Krakowski
Constableville, N.Y.

Be of good courage...

Hal Mc Whinnie on fri 26 sep 03


since there seems to be a great interest in this glaze level I will try to
send somee more.

semi opaque white gloss
cone 4-6
oxidation

cryolite 42
dolomite 36
zinc oxide 16
colemanite 34
whiting 6
ball clay 77
silica99
EPK 15
TIN OXIDE 11

PLEASE NOTE THE ABOVE ARE IN GRAMS AMOUNT AND NOT BY PERCENT

ANALYSIS
K2O .01 B2O3 0.19
AL2O3 0.35
tio2 0.02
sio2 2.12
NA2 .26
MGO .18
CAO .37
ZNO .17

Ababi on fri 26 sep 03


Hello Hal
This time I write before Ron.
First the Addict than the Guru!
The first thing to change into100%
HAL'S SEMI OPAQUE WHITE GLOSS
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Cone 6 1222 deg.C. -
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Cryolite 13.59 cryolite contributes to
beautiful greens Dolomite 11.65
Colemanite 11.00 the Colemanite is a terrible material. Once you
will like it the next time you buy it will "spit" on your shelves.
Calcium Carbonate 1.94
OM-4 Ball Clay 24.91 I chose Om 4 it is theoretical for me
silica 32.03
EPK Kaolin 4.85
Tin Oxide 3.56
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Seger Weight%
KNO 0.378 9.13%
CaO 0.450 9.73%
MgO 0.172 2.68%
Al2O3 0.379 14.89%
B2O3 0.234 6.26%
SiO2 2.460 56.96%
TiO2 0.011 0.35%
K2O 0.009 0.32%
Na2O 0.369 8.81%
Al:Si 6.48
Expan. 8.57
ST 343.91

I don't find any reason to use both Kaolin and ball clay In my
adjustment I shall use
the Om 4.

The easiest solution if you live in North America (or in the Northern
Negev):
HAL'S SEMI OPAQUE WHITE GLOSS
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Cone 6 1222 deg.C. -
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Cryolite 13.59
Dolomite 11.65
Cadycal (California) 11.00
Calcium Carbonate 2.84
OM-4 Ball Clay 24.92
silica 32.24
EPK Kaolin 4.85
Tin Oxide 3.56
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Seger Weight%
KNO 0.378 9.14%
CaO 0.452 9.77%
MgO 0.170 2.64%
Al2O3 0.380 14.90%
B2O3 0.234 6.28%
SiO2 2.460 56.92%
TiO2 0.011 0.35%
K2O 0.009 0.32%
Na2O 0.369 8.81%
Al:Si 6.48
Expan. 8.58
ST 343.80
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
Now to a bigger change
HAL'S SEMI OPAQUE WHITE GLOSS2
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Cone 6 1222 deg.C. -
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

frit 3195 24.13
Cryolite 11.74
EPK Kaolin 17.77 There was too much clay in the original recipe
Dolomite 12.85
Calcium Carbonate 3.00
Flint 30.48
Tin Oxide 3.56
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Seger Weight%
KNO 0.378 9.06%
CaO 0.450 9.77%
MgO 0.172 2.69%
Al2O3 0.379 14.96%
B2O3 0.234 6.29%
SiO2 2.460 57.22%
Na2O 0.378 9.06%
Al:Si 6.48
Expan. 8.55
ST 343.73
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Ababi Sharon
Glaze addict
Kibbutz Shoval Israel
ababisha@shoval.org.il
http://members4.clubphoto.com/ababi306910
http://www.matrix2000.co.nz/Matrix%20Demo/Ababi.htm



-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On Behalf Of Hal Mc
Whinnie
Sent: Friday, September 26, 2003 2:49 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: cone 6 glazes

since there seems to be a great interest in this glaze level I will try
to
send somee more.

semi opaque white gloss
cone 4-6
oxidation

cryolite 42
dolomite 36
zinc oxide 16
colemanite 34
whiting 6
ball clay 77
silica99
EPK 15
TIN OXIDE 11

PLEASE NOTE THE ABOVE ARE IN GRAMS AMOUNT AND NOT BY PERCENT

ANALYSIS
K2O .01 B2O3 0.19
AL2O3 0.35
tio2 0.02
sio2 2.12
NA2 .26
MGO .18
CAO .37
ZNO .17
.

Ron Roy on sun 28 sep 03


Just some helpful comments for anyone trying this glaze. I used Gerstely
Borate - not colemanite so the moleculare formulas will be different - less
B2O3 and less Al2O3 but more SiO2 - which would give it a chance of being a
stable glaze.

1. With 11% tin this will be completely opake - if you use a zircon based
opacifier like Superpax, Zircopax etc. it will still be opaque. It usually
takes twice as much zircon based opacifier to give the same results as tin.

2. I agree with Tony Hansen - that much Cryolite is going to be bad news if
you don't want bubbles and crators.

3. The expansion is a little high so it will craze on many bodies.

If it's a liner glaze you are after - this is not it.

RR


>semi opaque white gloss
>cone 4-6
>oxidation
>
>cryolite 42
>dolomite 36
>zinc oxide 16
>colemanite 34
>whiting 6
>ball clay 77
>silica99
>EPK 15
>TIN OXIDE 11
>
>PLEASE NOTE THE ABOVE ARE IN GRAMS AMOUNT AND NOT BY PERCENT
>
>ANALYSIS
>K2O .01 B2O3 0.19
> AL2O3 0.35
> tio2 0.02
> sio2 2.12
>NA2 .26
>MGO .18
>CAO .37
>ZNO .17
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.

Ron Roy
RR#4
15084 Little Lake Road
Brighton, Ontario
Canada
K0K 1H0
Phone: 613-475-9544
Fax: 613-475-3513

Alisa Clausen on fri 4 feb 05


Recently I have dove right into Mastering Cone 6 Glazes by hesselberth &
Roy...and I think I am missing something. Let's say I am making a High
Calcium Semimatte Base. I understand that when making it, the glaze
ingrediants must equal 100.0, but I am confused with the colorants. If =
I
am supposed to add 6% rutile and 4% manganese dioxide to make one color =
and
3% copper carbonate and 1.5% cobalt carbonate, what exactly does that
mean? I would appreciate any thoughts because I am thoroughly confused!



Dear Kelly,

You will get this very quickly. Recipes do not have to add to 100, but =
we like to have them add up to 100,
because it makes everything from there much easier.

When your recipe ingredients add up to 100 you can call it
100 grams, which equals 100 percent.

Therefore, because you are working with a 100, your added oxides can be =
expressed in percent of 100, easily translated to grams, how many grams =
of the oxide you need to color your 100 grams of base recipe glaze.
100 grams of glaze recipe and add
6 % Rutile
4% Manganese Diox.

That means 6 grams of Rutile.
and=20
4 grams of Manganese Diox. =20

1.5 Cobalt means
1.5 grams of Cobalt. If you can not weigh precisely that out, weigh out =
3 grams, and using a razor blade or similar,
cut the portion in half.

Ron and John's book has much more than recipes, so I hope you are =
reading it cover to cover. I frequently reread=20
sections that I do not remember, or want to be sure that I am =
remembering correctly.

Hope you have success!

regards from Alisa in Denmark

James and Sherron Bowen on thu 23 feb 06


Potters interested in Cone 6 glazes should not forget Michael Bailey's
excellent book "Glazes Cone 6".
It is available from the usual sources.







-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If there is no struggle there is no progress. Those who profess to favor
freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, want crops without plowing the
ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean
without the awful roar of its many waters. This struggle may be a moral one;
or it may be a physical one; or it may be both moral and physical; but it
must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand.
It never did and never will. . ....-- Fredrick Douglass --

Aline Salvat on fri 24 feb 06


Hi-
Lurker delurking here just to ask about the availability of "Glazes cone6"
I tried to order it from Amazon-uk last night and they said it wasn't
published yet, I could pre-order it but wouldnt get it until July.
Is it out of print?


----- Original Message -----
From: "James and Sherron Bowen"
To:
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2006 6:14 PM
Subject: Cone 6 glazes


> Potters interested in Cone 6 glazes should not forget Michael Bailey's
> excellent book "Glazes Cone 6".
> It is available from the usual sources.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> If there is no struggle there is no progress. Those who profess to favor
> freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, want crops without plowing the
> ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean
> without the awful roar of its many waters. This struggle may be a moral
> one;
> or it may be a physical one; or it may be both moral and physical; but it
> must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand.
> It never did and never will. . ....-- Fredrick Douglass --
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>
>

Marcia Selsor on sat 25 feb 06


Try the University of Pennsylvania Press which published Michael
Bailey's Cone 6 Glazes about three years ago.
Marcia:
The US publisher is U Penn Press, and I suspect it controls
closely the distribution. be well
peace Tom
Tom Buck ) -- primary address.

On Feb 25, 2006, at 3:07 PM, Earl Brunner wrote:

> http://www3.addall.com/
>
> Lists the book at a variety of locations. Type: Glazes Cone 6
>
> Earl Brunner
> e-mail: brunv53@yahoo.com
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Aline Salvat
> To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
> Sent: Friday, February 24, 2006 5:28:13 AM
> Subject: Re: Cone 6 glazes
>
>
> Hi-
> Lurker delurking here just to ask about the availability of "Glazes
> cone6"
> I tried to order it from Amazon-uk last night and they said it wasn't
> published yet, I could pre-order it but wouldnt get it until July.
> Is it out of print?
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "James and Sherron Bowen"
> To:
> Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2006 6:14 PM
> Subject: Cone 6 glazes
>
>
>> Potters interested in Cone 6 glazes should not forget Michael
>> Bailey's
>> excellent book "Glazes Cone 6".
>> It is available from the usual sources.
>>
>>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
> ________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.
>

Earl Brunner on sat 25 feb 06


http://www3.addall.com/

Lists the book at a variety of locations. Type: Glazes Cone 6

Earl Brunner
e-mail: brunv53@yahoo.com


----- Original Message ----
From: Aline Salvat
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Sent: Friday, February 24, 2006 5:28:13 AM
Subject: Re: Cone 6 glazes


Hi-
Lurker delurking here just to ask about the availability of "Glazes cone6"
I tried to order it from Amazon-uk last night and they said it wasn't
published yet, I could pre-order it but wouldnt get it until July.
Is it out of print?


----- Original Message -----
From: "James and Sherron Bowen"
To:
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2006 6:14 PM
Subject: Cone 6 glazes


> Potters interested in Cone 6 glazes should not forget Michael Bailey's
> excellent book "Glazes Cone 6".
> It is available from the usual sources.
>
>

James and Sherron Bowen on sun 26 feb 06


Another very fine book with a few interesting Cone 6 glazes is "Out of the
Earth Into the Fire" by Mimi Obstler. Maybe the experts on the list will
discuss the merits of this book in it's two editions.
Thanks




=================================================
"The evil that is in the world always comes of ignorance, and good
intentions may do as much harm as malevolence, if they lack understanding.
On the whole, men are more good than bad; that, however, isn't the real
point. But they are more or less ignorant, and it is that we call vice
or virtue; the most incorrigible vice being that of an ignorance which
fancies it knows everything and therefore claims for itself the right
to kill." Albert Camus: The Plague, Modern Library Edition, p. 120

Ron Roy on tue 28 feb 06


Hi James and Sherron,

I think Mimi's book is wonderful - for anyone who wants to understand
materials it is a must.

She has also co authored a book with Eppler which I believe will soon be
published - I predict it will be enlightening.

RR

>Another very fine book with a few interesting Cone 6 glazes is "Out of the
>Earth Into the Fire" by Mimi Obstler. Maybe the experts on the list will
>discuss the merits of this book in it's two editions.
>Thanks

Ron Roy
RR#4
15084 Little Lake Road
Brighton, Ontario
Canada
K0K 1H0
Phone: 613-475-9544
Fax: 613-475-3513

Aline Salvat on thu 2 mar 06


I wanted to say a great thank you to all those of you who answered my
question, onlist or privately.

I've found that the book is going to be published in England by A&C Black,
which explains the pre-order offer from Amazon-uk.

I'm still hesitating between Axner or Bath Potters to place my order for the
US edition. I had to wait for nearly 3 months once for books from the
States, customs delays I was told, so I usually prefer to order from English
bookstores (I forgot to say I live in the north of France, and please excuse
my English mistakes).

I learnt from Marcia Selsor that David Bailey has also written a book on C10
glazes. I have ordered it too, since I work on both C6 and C10 reduction
glazes
Thanks to Clayart recommendations I've already got quite a few great books
on glaze formulation and testing (Daly's, Ian Currie's, MC6G...) I'm waiting
for John Britt's book, which shouldn't be too long, and a few others.

I'm not a professional potter but I love glaze testing and I owe this list
almost everything I know about glazes and firing. Thank you to all of you
who share their knowledge and experience so generously .

Aline Salvat
aline.salvat@free.fr



----- Original Message ----
From: Aline Salvat
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Sent: Friday, February 24, 2006 5:28:13 AM
Subject: Re: Cone 6 glazes


Hi-
Lurker delurking here just to ask about the availability of "Glazes cone6"
I tried to order it from Amazon-uk last night and they said it wasn't
published yet, I could pre-order it but wouldnt get it until July.
Is it out of print?

Ella Boardman on sun 27 aug 06


I am quite new to creating pottery-6 months, two classes, one magazine subscription. My friend and
I are using cone 6 clay and premixed glazes from Georgies in Portland, Oregon. Are there cone 6 dry
glazes that you can buy and simply add the required water to them? Are they less expensive than
buying already mixed ones? I'm sure the least expensive way to get glaze is to buy the chemicals
and mix them yourself. We are hoping not to have to get into mixing chemicals. Thanks for any help
any of you can offer!

Mitch Kotula on mon 28 aug 06


Most all of the manufacturers will ship bags of dry glazes. Call and ask. Why pay to ship water weight?

If Georgies does not, try Laguna (they do ^5), Great Lakes, Coyote, Amaco... There is a lot of competition and variety out there.

Mitch


Mitch Kotula
Development Plus
PO Box 2076
Hamilton, MT 59840-4076
406-961-5136 (Home)
406-546-6980 (Cell)

---------------------------------
Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1/min.

Snail Scott on mon 28 aug 06


At 05:57 PM 8/27/2006 -0400, Ella B wrote:
>...Are there cone 6 dry
>glazes that you can buy and simply add the required water to them? Are
they less expensive than
>buying already mixed ones?


You betcha. Laguna makes quite a few, as
does Minnesota Clay and many others. (Check
the magazine ads.) They can often be had
in quantities from 1 pound packets to 50
pound sacks. If you have a favorite premixed
glaze, why not ask the manufacturer if it's
available dry?

By the way, most dry mixes have no 'additives',
leaving that to the discretion and taste of
the buyer. To make the dry-mix glaze act like
the wet-mixed stuff you know, plan to add
some CMC and possibly bentonite. A little of
each goes a long way.

-Snail

Paul Lewing on mon 28 aug 06


On Aug 27, 2006, at 2:57 PM, Ella Boardman wrote:

I am quite new to creating pottery-6 months, two classes, one
magazine subscription. My friend and
I are using cone 6 clay and premixed glazes from Georgies in
Portland, Oregon. Are there cone 6 dry
glazes that you can buy and simply add the required water to them?
Clay Art Center in Tacoma, WA has some nice ones, and shipping
shouldn't be as much from there as from farther away.
Paul Lewing
www.paullewingtile.com

curtis adkins on mon 28 aug 06


Hey Mitch,

Does store bought glaze have to be mixed w/ all those additives...cmc, bentonite, and such?

Curt

Mitch Kotula wrote: Most all of the manufacturers will ship bags of dry glazes. Call and ask. Why pay to ship water weight?

If Georgies does not, try Laguna (they do ^5), Great Lakes, Coyote, Amaco... There is a lot of competition and variety out there.

Mitch


Mitch Kotula
Development Plus
PO Box 2076
Hamilton, MT 59840-4076
406-961-5136 (Home)
406-546-6980 (Cell)

---------------------------------
Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1/min.

______________________________________________________________________________
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.

Mitch Kotula on tue 29 aug 06


As was previously mentioned, aditives are your choice, depending on what you want to prevent or enhance. There are a number available to inhibit settleing, increase adhesion, etc, so read-up and determine if you need want additives.

Some/most liquid commercial glazes contain them and it is good to know just what they contain going forward in using them.

Mitch


Mitch Kotula
Development Plus
PO Box 2076
Hamilton, MT 59840-4076
406-961-5136 (Home)
406-546-6980 (Cell)

---------------------------------
Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1/min.

Snail Scott on tue 29 aug 06


At 05:39 PM 8/28/2006 -0700, Curt wrote:
>Does store bought glaze have to be mixed w/ all those additives...cmc,
bentonite, and such?



It's entirely a mater of personal taste,
and the purpose you intend. For brushing,
you might want lots of gum, and maybe
even glycerine or other materials to
increase flow and viscosity. For dipping,
you might want bentonite to maintain
suspension. Depending on the recipe, you
might want something to reduce dustiness
of the dried coating, etc. You don't HAVE
to to anything. Working with dry-mixed
commercial glaze isn't much different
than with homemade glaze; you make the
same choices on these issues.

Most wet-mixed commercial glazes in those
little jars are optimized for brushing,
with lots of gum and suchlike. (That's
why they're so tough to reconstitute when
they dry out.)

-Snail

Eve Rose on mon 19 apr 10


_Mastering Cone 6 Glazes_ by John Hesselberth and Ron Roy. Your friend=3D2=
0
is right. Must have.

_Glazes Cone 6_ by Michael Bailey

There are also a lot of really neat glaze recipes in the ClayArt=3D20
archives. A couple of them have become staples for me.

But as always, before you mix up a big batch: test..test..test!

Linda Mccaleb wrote:

> Hello, It's me again,
> I'm going to bother you all again. I'm looking for a book on cone 6 gl=
=3D
azes. One that will fit my cone 5-6 Porcelain and B-mix. I also have some=
=3D
store made stoneware, I don't know how to match glazes with the clay bod=
=3D
y. I know they have to fit, but have a range of left and right to them. I=
=3D
was told by a friend to get Ron Roy and John Hesselberth's book on cone =
=3D
6 glazes. I want a clear, and a few colors. When my friend told me that I=
=3D
could buy just by the pound instead of a 50 pound bag of everything I wa=
=3D
s ecstatic. She said that I could make a 5 gallon bucket of glaze for 20$=
=3D
to 30$, I'm sure the price is approximate. But golly gee (Ha Ha) that's =
=3D
cheaper than buying a pint of some glazes! AND I CAN DIP! I am tired of b=
=3D
rushing everything! It takes all day to paint a kiln load of stuff. A day=
=3D
of fireing, a day of cooling, a day of glazing, a day of fireing and a d=
=3D
ay of cooling. Not to mention the drying period. Taking off a day will be=
=3D
wonderful. I could
> glaze in the morning and fire that afternoon. Can't beat that with a st=
=3D
ick!
> Thanks to all of you again,
> Linda
>
>
>
>
>
> =3D20
>

Linda Mccaleb on mon 19 apr 10


=3DA0 Hello, It's me again,=3D0A=3DA0 I'm going to bother you all again. I'=
m look=3D
ing for a book on cone 6 glazes. One that will fit my cone 5-6 Porcelain an=
=3D
d B-mix. I also have some store made stoneware, I don't know how to match g=
=3D
lazes with the clay body. I know they have to fit, but have a range of left=
=3D
and right to them. I was told by a friend to get Ron Roy and John Hesselbe=
=3D
rth's book on cone 6 glazes. I want a clear, and a few colors. When my frie=
=3D
nd told me that I could buy just by the pound instead of a 50 pound bag of =
=3D
everything I was ecstatic. She said that I could make a 5 gallon bucket of =
=3D
glaze for 20$ to 30$, I'm sure the price is approximate. But golly gee (Ha =
=3D
Ha) that's cheaper than buying a pint of some glazes! AND I CAN DIP! I am t=
=3D
ired of brushing everything! It takes all day to paint a kiln load of stuff=
=3D
. A day of fireing, a day of cooling, a day of glazing, a day of fireing an=
=3D
d a day of cooling. Not to mention the drying period. Taking off a day will=
=3D
be wonderful. I could
glaze in the morning and fire that afternoon. Can't beat that with a stick=
=3D
!=3D0A=3DA0 Thanks to all of you again,=3D0A=3DA0 Linda=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A

Phoenix Rising Farm on mon 19 apr 10


Linda:
You are indeed correct. If you beat them with a stick, all your efforts =
=3D

will be in vain
for the pots will shatter. Don't ask me how I know . (from watching=3D2=
0
Taylor, hehehe)

Yes, yes, a thousand times yes...BUY RON AND JOHN'S "MASTERING CONE 6=3D20
GLAZES".
I think we're all in agreement on this, right folks?

Remember that when dipping, different timing needs be applied than when=3D2=
0
brushing.
You'll find out soon enough.

Start with a good basic white or clear that fits YOUR claybody (even=3D20
with a bit of adjustment---- test, test, test)
then add colorants and opacifiers. If you have a copy of "Clay and=3D20
Glazes for the Potter" by
Rhodes, take the time to read it. You'll learn.....
Have fun!

Best,
Wayne Seidl

On 4/19/2010 1:27 PM, Linda Mccaleb wrote:
> Hello, It's me again,
> I'm going to bother you all again. I'm looking for a book on cone 6 =
=3D
glazes. One that will fit my cone 5-6 Porcelain and B-mix. I also have so=
=3D
me store made stoneware, I don't know how to match glazes with the clay b=
=3D
ody. I know they have to fit, but have a range of left and right to them.=
=3D
I was told by a friend to get Ron Roy and John Hesselberth's book on con=
=3D
e 6 glazes. I want a clear, and a few colors. When my friend told me that=
=3D
I could buy just by the pound instead of a 50 pound bag of everything I =
=3D
was ecstatic. She said that I could make a 5 gallon bucket of glaze for 2=
=3D
0$ to 30$, I'm sure the price is approximate. But golly gee (Ha Ha) that'=
=3D
s cheaper than buying a pint of some glazes! AND I CAN DIP! I am tired of=
=3D
brushing everything! It takes all day to paint a kiln load of stuff. A d=
=3D
ay of fireing, a day of cooling, a day of glazing, a day of fireing and a=
=3D
day of cooling. Not to mention the drying period. Taking off a day will =
=3D
be wonderful. I could
> glaze in the morning and fire that afternoon. Can't beat that with a =
=3D
stick!
> Thanks to all of you again,
> Linda
>
>
>
>
> =3D20


--=3D20
Phoenix Rising Farm
on the Houlton Road
Waite, Maine

John Rodgers on mon 19 apr 10


Linda,

Buy the book, AND buy the software - they really go together. The two=3D20
have been of inestimable value to me. With them, you can't go wrong for=3D2=
0
cone 6 work. It makes glaze development so easy. There are several=3D20
different glazes in the book with which you can work including several=3D20
clear glazes. The clear glazes are actually base glazes to which you can =
=3D

add colorants if you wish - or simply fire them clear.

So far as matching the glaze to the clay - the ultimate way is to do a=3D20
test of the glaze on the clay you wish to work with. When I test a new=3D20
glaze I put it on a small pitcher or other small vessel. I don't like=3D20
using test tiles. They don't tell me enough. I want to see how the glaze =
=3D

behaves on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. I also want to see how =
=3D

it behaves in pooling as in the bottom of a bowl. That's my way. Other's =
=3D

may prefer doing it different. Your choice.

So far as ingredients for glazes, you can order most supplies by the=3D20
pound, but you pay a premium generally speaking. If you order a bag of=3D20
each ingredient - usually 25, 50, or 100 lbs, you get significant price=3D2=
0
breaks - but you have to decided when enough is enough. I mix several 16 =
=3D

gallon vats of different colored glazes at a time, that I may dip=3D20
easily, so I buy my glaze materials by the bag.

Good luck.

John Rodgers
Clayartist and Moldmaker
88'GL VW Bus Driver
Chelsea, AL
Http://www.moldhaus.com


On 4/19/2010 12:27 PM, Linda Mccaleb wrote:
> Hello, It's me again,
> I'm going to bother you all again. I'm looking for a book on cone 6 =
=3D
glazes. One that will fit my cone 5-6 Porcelain and B-mix. I also have so=
=3D
me store made stoneware, I don't know how to match glazes with the clay b=
=3D
ody. I know they have to fit, but have a range of left and right to them.=
=3D
I was told by a friend to get Ron Roy and John Hesselberth's book on con=
=3D
e 6 glazes. I want a clear, and a few colors. When my friend told me that=
=3D
I could buy just by the pound instead of a 50 pound bag of everything I =
=3D
was ecstatic. She said that I could make a 5 gallon bucket of glaze for 2=
=3D
0$ to 30$, I'm sure the price is approximate. But golly gee (Ha Ha) that'=
=3D
s cheaper than buying a pint of some glazes! AND I CAN DIP! I am tired of=
=3D
brushing everything! It takes all day to paint a kiln load of stuff. A d=
=3D
ay of fireing, a day of cooling, a day of glazing, a day of fireing and a=
=3D
day of cooling. Not to mention the drying period. Taking off a day will =
=3D
be wonderful. I could
> glaze in the morning and fire that afternoon. Can't beat that with a =
=3D
stick!
> Thanks to all of you again,
> Linda
>
>
>
>
>
> =3D20

Snail Scott on mon 19 apr 10


On Apr 19, 2010, at 12:27 PM, Linda Mccaleb wrote:

> Hello, It's me again,
> I'm going to bother you all again. I'm looking for a book on cone
> 6 glazes. One that will fit my cone 5-6 Porcelain and B-mix...


Now this is the best reason of all to make your
own glazes: most commercially-made premixes
are made to fit the average thermal expansion of
average stonewares. Porcelain is very different,
and most standard premixes work poorly on it.
Even B-Mix is not often a good fit for these glazes.

I like the explanation in Bailey's 'Glazes Cone 6',
with its side-by-side photo comparisons of the same
glazes on multiple clays, and its clear charts of the
differences. Consider Hesselberth and Roy, too:
Mastering Cone SIx Glazes'.

Chappell's 'Complete Book of Clay and Glazes'
has a number of recipes for porcelain base glazes,
but no comprehensive discussion of the difference.

-Snail

William & Susan Schran User on tue 20 apr 10


On 4/19/10 1:27 PM, "Linda Mccaleb" wrote:

> =3DA0 Hello, It's me again,
> =3DA0 I'm going to bother you all again. I'm looking for a book on cone 6=
gla=3D
zes.
> One that will fit my cone 5-6 Porcelain and B-mix. I also have some store=
=3D
made
> stoneware, I don't know how to match glazes with the clay body. I know th=
=3D
ey
> have to fit, but have a range of left and right to them. I was told by a
> friend to get Ron Roy and John Hesselberth's book on cone 6 glazes. I wan=
=3D
t a
> clear, and a few colors. When my friend told me that I could buy just by =
=3D
the
> pound instead of a 50 pound bag of everything I was ecstatic. She said th=
=3D
at I
> could make a 5 gallon bucket of glaze for 20$ to 30$, I'm sure the price =
=3D
is
> approximate. But golly gee (Ha Ha) that's cheaper than buying a pint of s=
=3D
ome
> glazes! AND I CAN DIP! I am tired of brushing everything! It takes all da=
=3D
y to
> paint a kiln load of stuff. A day of fireing, a day of cooling, a day of
> glazing, a day of fireing and a day of cooling. Not to mention the drying
> period. Taking off a day will be wonderful. I could
> glaze in the morning and fire that afternoon. Can't beat that with a sti=
=3D
ck!

Buy Mastering Cone 6 Glazes!
Even if you never mix any of the glazes, you will gain a great understandin=
=3D
g
of glazes and firing schedules, especially the importance of controlled
cooling. Using their suggested firing schedule will make any commercial
glaze come out better.
Generally speaking, the larger the quantity of glaze or chemical you buy,
the cheaper it is per pound. But certainly you can buy smaller amounts.
If you do purchase glazes, do buy dry. You can also begin testing by gettin=
=3D
g
clear or white glazes and add your own colorants.
Bill

--=3D20
William "Bill" Schran
wschran@cox.net
wschran@nvcc.edu
http://www.creativecreekartisans.com

Chic Lotz on thu 22 apr 10


Linda,

I'm looking for a book on cone 6 glazes. One that will fit my cone 5-6
Porcelain and B-mix. I also have some store made stoneware, I don't
know how to match glazes with the clay body.

If you don't want crazed glazes, then glaze fit will be important,
especially for porcelain and B-Mix. Porcelain and stoneware will have
different expansion rates, so finding glazes that fit both nicely will
take some experimenting, mixing and testing. Mastering Cone 6 Glazes
will help you understand some of the problems and solutions to
creating well fitting glazes. Plus John and Ron discuss "stable
glazes" if that you need them for food surfaces. Michael Bailey also
wrote a wonderful book, Cone 6 Glazes. As far as ordering your
materials, knowing which ingredients you will need in larger or
smaller amounts will be helpful. If you want help with that
information, email a request to me and I'll send you my article on
creating a "GlazeRoom Starter Package."

Chic Lotz
www.Potterypoet.com
Chic@PotteryPoet.com

Joseph Troncale on thu 22 apr 10


When you consider the time you spend throwing and firing, making
glazes is a relatively brief use of time with a tremendous cost saving.
More importantly, however, it allows experimentation and an
understanding of the materials. It builds some confidence over time.
Mastering Cone6 Glazes is a great book.
Cheers,
Joe Troncale in
Pennsylvania

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2010, at 8:45 AM, William & Susan Schran User > wrote:

> On 4/19/10 1:27 PM, "Linda Mccaleb" wrote:
>
>> Hello, It's me again,
>> I'm going to bother you all again. I'm looking for a book on cone
>> 6 glazes.
>> One that will fit my cone 5-6 Porcelain and B-mix. I also have some
>> store made
>> stoneware, I don't know how to match glazes with the clay body. I
>> know they
>> have to fit, but have a range of left and right to them. I was told
>> by a
>> friend to get Ron Roy and John Hesselberth's book on cone 6 glazes.
>> I want a
>> clear, and a few colors. When my friend told me that I could buy
>> just by the
>> pound instead of a 50 pound bag of everything I was ecstatic. She
>> said that I
>> could make a 5 gallon bucket of glaze for 20$ to 30$, I'm sure the
>> price is
>> approximate. But golly gee (Ha Ha) that's cheaper than buying a
>> pint of some
>> glazes! AND I CAN DIP! I am tired of brushing everything! It takes
>> all day to
>> paint a kiln load of stuff. A day of fireing, a day of cooling, a
>> day of
>> glazing, a day of fireing and a day of cooling. Not to mention the
>> drying
>> period. Taking off a day will be wonderful. I could
>> glaze in the morning and fire that afternoon. Can't beat that with
>> a stick!
>
> Buy Mastering Cone 6 Glazes!
> Even if you never mix any of the glazes, you will gain a great
> understanding
> of glazes and firing schedules, especially the importance of
> controlled
> cooling. Using their suggested firing schedule will make any
> commercial
> glaze come out better.
> Generally speaking, the larger the quantity of glaze or chemical you
> buy,
> the cheaper it is per pound. But certainly you can buy smaller
> amounts.
> If you do purchase glazes, do buy dry. You can also begin testing by
> getting
> clear or white glazes and add your own colorants.
> Bill
>
> --
> William "Bill" Schran
> wschran@cox.net
> wschran@nvcc.edu
> http://www.creativecreekartisans.com

Linda Mccaleb on mon 26 apr 10


=3DA0 Hello everybody,=3D0A=3DA0 I'm back again. I just want to say what a =
wonder=3D
ful bunch of people you are. I got many responses. Some were opinions about=
=3D
books, John Britt said that all I needed was some recipes and go for it, o=
=3D
r something like that, I don't have his quote right here in front of me. He=
=3D
asked me to write and tell you my reaction to that. Well I think he is rig=
=3D
ht in a lot of ways. Cone6 glazes, or mid range glazes are going to react t=
=3D
he same way to the temperatures on any thing that it fits. I have bought ma=
=3D
ny commercial glazes, used them on all my different kinds of clay, and have=
=3D
not had a problem with crazing, or crawling or any other problem, except f=
=3D
or maybe coverage was different and needed another coat.=3DA0=3D0A=3DA0 But=
befor=3D
e I invest in any materials other than the ones I already had on hand, I WI=
=3D
LL read Mastering Cone 6 Glazes. Everybody seems to be in agreement with th=
=3D
at. It has also been mentioned that for other glazes for cone 10 for instan=
=3D
ce will benefit form the information in this book. I agree, with that many =
=3D
people writing me telling me to get that book, there were a few others too.=
=3D
But the first book mentioned was that one. I have checked the libraries, w=
=3D
ith not much hope, and as to my expectations, there was not one in the area=
=3D
of 75 miles, that includes Dallas Texas. So I know that there would be not=
=3D
a single person who would have a copy to sell. That must be the=3DA0end al=
l =3D
of all glaze books. I guess they broke the mold of glaze books when they ma=
=3D
de that one. I'm glad it isn't a limited edition. I will look at my usual s=
=3D
pots to find used books, but I bet there aren't any. My only chance is that=
=3D
someone has gotten out of clay and sold out.=3D0A=3DA0 I want to thank eve=
rybo=3D
dy that wrote me and added to my knowledge of the glazing process. And the =
=3D
recipes too. I knew you were a great bunch out there. I even wrote back to =
=3D
a few and they kindly wrote back with an answer. I just want to say thank y=
=3D
ou so much for your time and knowledge.=3D0A=3DA0=3DA0 Linda M=3D0A=3D0A=3D=
0A

Linda Mccaleb on tue 27 apr 10


=3DA0 John Britt said for me to mention that he suggested to read Allison C=
la=3D
usen's book too. He told me that it was a good book to get. I know that he =
=3D
does know his glazes, so I will get this book first. I know I said that I w=
=3D
ould buy Mastering Cone 6 Glazes first, but I don't have the money for a 90=
=3D
dollar book right now. And he suggested to google some of the information =
=3D
and go ahead and make some glazes and to google if I have a problem with th=
=3D
e shivering or crazing...at least I will have a bucket of glaze that I can =
=3D
experiment with(not a bucket, a cup full at a time), =3D0A=3DA0 I want to t=
hank=3D
all the people who answered me in detail, John Britt,=3DA0 Maggie,Bonnie, =
Jo=3D
hn Rodgers, Elane, Bill, and John Good all who answered me personally, and =
=3D
those who answered me in the list too. too many names to list.=3D0A=3DA0 Th=
anks=3D
to all of you,=3D0A=3DA0 Linda M=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A

Lee Love on tue 27 apr 10


On Tue, Apr 27, 2010 at 9:39 AM, Linda Mccaleb wro=
=3D
te:

> John Britt said for me to mention that he suggested to read Allison
> Clausen's book too. He told me that it was a good book to get. I know tha=
=3D
t
> he does know his glazes, so I will get this book first. I know I said tha=
=3D
t I
> would buy Mastering Cone 6 Glazes first, but I don't have the money for a=
=3D
90
> dollar book right now.
>

$90.00! I just ordered it at my library through interlibrary loan. Maybe
you can too.

--
Lee, a Mashiko potter in Minneapolis
http://mashikopots.blogspot.com/

=3D93Observe the wonders as they occur around you. Don't claim them. Feel t=
he
artistry moving through and be silent.=3D94 --Rumi

Rose Bauer on tue 27 apr 10


http://www.masteringglazes.com/

Hi Linda,=3D20

The book is available direct from this web site for a lot less $ ....
cheers

rose bauer

John Britt on tue 27 apr 10


Linda,=3D20

Thanks for getting back to us.

But you don't have to buy my book. The whole point is to make glazes and
have fun. And you certainly can do that by getting recipes on-line or jus=
=3D
t
asking for them on Clayart.

Don't buy my book! I am sure you can borrow it form someone or get it
interlibrary loan. Anyone short of cash should by glaze chemicals and get=
=3D
to
work!

You can read later,

John Britt
www.johnbrittpottery.com

Nancy Gallagher on tue 27 apr 10


On Apr 27, 2010, at 11:03 AM, Lee Love wrote:

> On Tue, Apr 27, 2010 at 9:39 AM, Linda Mccaleb =3D
wrote:
>=3D20
>> I know I said that I
>> would buy Mastering Cone 6 Glazes first, but I don't have the money =3D
for a 90
>> dollar book right now.
>>=3D20

For MC6 Glazes???

$39.95

http://www.masteringglazes.com/


Nancy=3D

William & Susan Schran User on tue 27 apr 10


On 4/27/10 10:39 AM, "Linda Mccaleb" wrote:

> I know I said that I would buy Mastering Cone 6 Glazes first, but I don't=
have
> the money for a 90 dollar book right now.

Whatever gave you the idea the book was $90?
The book is $40 + shipping.
GlazeMaster software costs $50.
Together they are $90, but you can buy just the book, then get the software=
,
if you want, later.

Bill

--
William "Bill" Schran
wschran@cox.net
wschran@nvcc.edu
http://www.creativecreekartisans.com

John Britt on tue 27 apr 10


Hey Bill,

Probably what happened is that if you search on Amazon they have New and
Used and the Used can be whatever price. So their book runs from $75.00 -=
=3D

$155.64 plus shipping.=3D20

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0973006307/ref=3D3Dsr_1_1_olp?ie=3D3=
DU=3D
TF8&s=3D3Dbooks&qid=3D3D1272399928&sr=3D3D1-1&condition=3D3Dused

But the point for Linda was that she did not have much money so whether i=
=3D
t
was $155 or $90 or $40.95 it was an unnecessary expense just to make some=
=3D

glazes. I posted the recipes and so now she can spend the money on glaze=
=3D

chemicals and those are expensive enough.

She is also trying inter-library loan.

I really don't think she is ready for that book or glazes software both o=
=3D
f
which are unnecessary to make her first glaze and test it.

Out,

John Britt
www.johnbrittpottery.com

Steve Slatin on tue 27 apr 10


The author of GlazeMaster allows you to download the program and
experiment with it for 60 days without paying anything.=3DA0 If after 60
days you find it's not useful, you owe him nothing and can delete
the program easily from your computer (it doesn't muck up the=3D20
storage area or the registry).
=3DA0
So you can buy the book for $40 and download the try-ware=3D20
program and use them together to find if you start to understand
how glazes work.
=3DA0
If you find=3DA0the program=3DA0essential after 60 days, then $50 is cheap =
for =3D
it.
The only caution I'd give is that people tend to stick with whatever
software they start with, and there other good glaze calc programs
that you may find as easy or easier to use than GlazeMaster.=3DA0 (Several
people I know and trust like Insight, &=3DA0I believe GlazeCalc is still a
free download),=3DA0 Ask around with people who you trust and find
what they use.=3DA0 And do bear in mind that the calc program itself
is only half the resource -- the other half is the materials database.
If it doesn't have the stuff you use, you'll have to research each
item and enter the details individually.

Steve Slatin --=3D20



--- On Tue, 4/27/10, William & Susan Schran User wrote:


On 4/27/10 10:39 AM, "Linda Mccaleb" wrote:

> I know I said that I would buy Mastering Cone 6 Glazes first, but I don't=
=3D
have
> the money for a 90 dollar book right now.

Whatever gave you the idea the book was $90?
The book is $40 + shipping.
GlazeMaster software costs $50.
Together they are $90, but you can buy just the book, then get the software=
=3D
,
if you want, later.

Bill

--
William "Bill" Schran
wschran@cox.net
wschran@nvcc.edu
http://www.creativecreekartisans.com
=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A

Eve Rose on tue 27 apr 10


http://www.masteringglazes.com/index.html

I got it for $40 plus shipping

Lee Love wrote:

>On Tue, Apr 27, 2010 at 9:39 AM, Linda Mccaleb =
=3D
wrote:
>
> =3D20
>
>> John Britt said for me to mention that he suggested to read Allison
>>Clausen's book too. He told me that it was a good book to get. I know t=
=3D
hat
>>he does know his glazes, so I will get this book first. I know I said t=
=3D
hat I
>>would buy Mastering Cone 6 Glazes first, but I don't have the money for=
=3D
a 90
>>dollar book right now.
>>
>> =3D20
>>
>
>$90.00! I just ordered it at my library through interlibrary loan. Ma=
=3D
ybe
>you can too.
>
>--
>Lee, a Mashiko potter in Minneapolis
>http://mashikopots.blogspot.com/
>
>=3D93Observe the wonders as they occur around you. Don't claim them. Feel =
=3D
the
>artistry moving through and be silent.=3D94 --Rumi
>
>
> =3D20
>

Steve Slatin on wed 28 apr 10


Monica --
=3DA0
Most cone 10 glossy glazes have sintered by cone 6.=3DA0 Some may have
gone even a bit beyond sintering.=3DA0 (Sintering is the stage in the
glazing process that comes before melting, when the materials
form a solid agglomeration but have not yet matured into a glass.)
They will probably not be actual glasses at that point, however.

Because at ^6 the ^10 glaze is not matured, it will not have the
structural or chemical strength it would have if fired to maturity.
=3DA0
There are other ways to get a matte effect in a glaze.=3DA0 One is to
have a slow fire-down, possibly raising the temperature once
or twice during the fire-down, which will often encourage a=3D20
non-glossy surface.=3DA0 Sometimes it comes from micro-crystalline
growth.=3DA0 Certain glazes will give you the micro-crystalline
growth even without a slow cool.=3DA0 These glazes can be
fully mature and have a matte surface.=3DA0 But if you fire them
to ^10, they will run right down the side of the pot.=3DA0=3D20
=3DA0
There are clay/glaze combinations that I've seen react as=3D20
though they were a cone or even two 'off' from their target
range.=3DA0 For example, one of my favorite glazes --
=3DA0
=3DA0Recipe Name: The Yellow (Ian Begg's Clear)

Cone: 6 Color: Clear
Firing: Oxidation Surface: Glossy

Amount Ingredient
50 Frit--Ferro 3134
30 Kaolin--EPK
20 Silica
4 Titanium Dioxide
4 Ceramic Rutile
1 Bentonite

109 Total

This is a nice yellow glaze at ^6 over white stoneware=3D20
(OH-6, Tacoma Clay Art). At ^6 over NZ-6, a very
translucent porcelain, it's white and runs like it'd
been overfired by at least a cone and maybe two. At
^6 over Tacoma Clay Art's English Grolleg-6, it's
opaque, white where thick, yellow where thin, and
doesn't run.

Steve Slatin --=3D20


--- On Wed, 4/28/10, Monica Wright wrote:


I was always taught that a cone 6 mat glaze is nothing but a cone 10 gloss =
=3D
glaze not fired high enough.=3DA0 Made sense to me.=3DA0 Not sure if that w=
as o=3D
ff topic or not.=3DA0 Oh well.



=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A

Claudia MacPhee on wed 28 apr 10


=3DA0=3D20

=3DA0 If you are a glaze beginner without many resources (like $$)=3D2C I t=
hink=3D
Ravenscrag slip is the way to go. It is ground up glacial silt from Saskat=
=3D
chewan in Canada. All you need is a bag of Ravenscrag (cheap)=3D2C a bag of=
3=3D
134 frit and some oxides and you are in business.=3D20
=3DA0=3DA0 There is a handy web page full of recipes and starting points fo=
r yo=3D
ur own experimentation and you are good to go. Cone 5=3D2C6 or 7=3D2C it wo=
rks =3D
at all of them. Google it or try www.Ravenscrag.com (not sure).
=3DA0=3DA0 Personally I think the glazes are more interesting than the MC6G=
one=3D
s. But then I am highly prejudiced=3D2C loving straight earth materials and=
b=3D
eing a wood convert. I use the stuff at 10 w/o frit in my wood kiln and lov=
=3D
e the results.
=3DA0=3DA0 I don't know why it has never caught on. Too easy maybe? I have =
trie=3D
d the glazes on lots of diverse clay bodies at school and never had any fit=
=3D
problems=3D2C think it is really forgiving.
=3DA0=3DA0 Anyhow=3D2C that is just my idea of a good and easy starting poi=
nt=3D2C

=3DA0=3DA0 Claudia MacPhee=3DA0 Tagish=3D2C Yukon
=3DA0=3DA0 www.paintedbyfire.blogspot.com=3DA0 =3DA0=3D20
=3D20
_________________________________________________________________
Hotmail & Messenger. Get them on your phone now.
http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=3D3D9724463=3D

John Britt on wed 28 apr 10


Nice Claudia,=3D20

Also, Ohio Slip makes some nice glazes.=3D20

John Britt
www.johnbrittpottery.com

Birgit Wright on wed 28 apr 10


Hi Claudia=3D3B I checked out the website for ravenscrag=3D2C the glazes l=
ook =3D
great=3D2C and easy=3D2C for cone 6. I think I will try to get some if its=
a r=3D
easonable cost.=3D20

Thanks=3D3B Birgit Wright=3D2C ( in Ontario)=3D20
=3D20
> Date: Wed=3D2C 28 Apr 2010 08:46:57 -0700
> From: erstenhorpel@HOTMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: cone 6 glazes
> To: Clayart@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
>=3D20
> =3D20
>=3D20
> If you are a glaze beginner without many resources (like $$)=3D2C I thi=
nk=3D
Ravenscrag slip is the way to go. It is ground up glacial silt from Saskat=
=3D
chewan in Canada. All you need is a bag of Ravenscrag (cheap)=3D2C a bag of=
3=3D
134 frit and some oxides and you are in business.=3D20
> There is a handy web page full of recipes and starting points for your=
=3D
own experimentation and you are good to go. Cone 5=3D2C6 or 7=3D2C it work=
s at=3D
all of them. Google it or try www.Ravenscrag.com (not sure).
> Personally I think the glazes are more interesting than the MC6G ones.=
=3D
But then I am highly prejudiced=3D2C loving straight earth materials and b=
ei=3D
ng a wood convert. I use the stuff at 10 w/o frit in my wood kiln and love =
=3D
the results.
> I don't know why it has never caught on. Too easy maybe? I have tried =
=3D
the glazes on lots of diverse clay bodies at school and never had any fit p=
=3D
roblems=3D2C think it is really forgiving.
> Anyhow=3D2C that is just my idea of a good and easy starting point=3D2=
C
>=3D20
> Claudia MacPhee Tagish=3D2C Yukon
> www.paintedbyfire.blogspot.com =3D20
>=3D20
> _________________________________________________________________
> Hotmail & Messenger. Get them on your phone now.
> http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=3D3D9724463
=3D20
_________________________________________________________________
Got a phone? Get Hotmail & Messenger for mobile!
http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=3D3D9724464=3D

lili krakowski on wed 28 apr 10


Thank you Maurice, thank you, John Britt. I will try to keep subject =3D
headings whenever I can from now on. Promise.

I am too ignorant to discuss what Zen Masters mean or not, and of =3D
course, lots of things exist while really not existing, and vice-versa. =
=3D
But that has more to do with life than with glaze. ("Perfect love" =3D
being an example)

When I argue that a c.6 glaze does not exist, this is true, and I am not =
=3D
persnickity or like that. Because what a perfect c.6 glaze IS depends =3D
on too many factors. A perfect c.6 is a glaze that,at c. 6., is =3D
perfect in the eye of the potter. And -- in relation to certain =3D
criteria which apply to ALL glazes, not just c.6. or any other =3D
particular, specific cone---achieves what the potter wants. =3D20

Take "Kerfuffle c. 6 glaze" found in SuperMaster's Book. And forget we =3D
may be talking Seger cones (still in use ) or Orton cones.
Kerfuffle at c. 4 is a rough looking glaze gorgeous for underwater =3D
"rocks" for aquaria. At c.5 is is a dullish, satiny glaze, ok on lamp =3D
bases, not quite durable enough for food use. At c. 6 it is a silky =3D
lovely semi-transparent that sings over iron slips. And THAT is what I =3D
am talking about.One potter swears by Kerffuffle for aquarium rocks; =3D
another loves it for lamp bases, and yet another uses it for dinner =3D
ware.

I think we mislead neophytes with labels like c.6 or c.10, and I prefer =
=3D
books where glazes are listed as within a range, (low temp, mid-temp, =3D
high temp) or by family (as Behrens does in "Glaze Projects." )

If you follow novices' laments you will see my point (I hope). Too =3D
much agonizing over .5% frit or 2% clay. Masses of new potters lose =3D
sleep because they do not know how close they are to getting what they =3D
want. (Reminds one of Scott's last expedition)=3D20

I love RonJohn's book. It is tops. They make a good case, and give =3D
good explanations about leaching, durability, and so on.
But they are not alone...and their point about leaching, durability and =3D
all that is not limited to c.6.

There is this fellow, one John Britt, you may have heard of him. =3D
Wonderful book....called "The Complete Guide to High-Fire Glazes" And =3D
there is detailed, beautifully illustrated stuff in there about =3D
materials, and families of glazes, and methods of testing, and kilns, =3D
and kiln atmosphere, and application--just about everything except what =3D
to have for dinner. And should everyone firing at c.6 read it? YES! OF =3D
COURSE. Just as c.10 firers will learn lots from RonJohn. (Lime juice =3D
is lime juice, after all.) (As Hobart Cowles used to say: "If you learn =3D
just one thing from a book--it's worth it.")

Ninety percent of what John Britt writes applies at all temps. A flux =3D
melts the glaze. ALumina holds it to the pot .Silica forms glass. =3D
Cobalt will make the glaze blue...ETC.

In "Glaze Without Fear Part I" (Part II is sorta in the works) Ihada =3D
Vishun discusses testing and testing glaze.

What I try to "combat" is novices thinking , as so many seem to be, that =
=3D
once you have a glaze recipe you are home free...Even freer if you have =3D
a dozen recipes!! And novices blaming "sources" for giving them "bad" =3D
glazes. And not understanding why a glaze recipe given them for a =3D
glaze they used at the Community Center Pottery Classes, does not work =3D
for them at home. And not quite understanding offered remedies. And =3D
spending money on glaze pantries and equipment and like that when they =3D
have no real idea what they are doing, and less idea if they are =3D
committed to doing it.=3D20

In 1985 "Ceramics Monthly" published a Comment of mine called "Why That =3D
Glaze Does Not Work". If you look at it you will see I have been =3D
pleading the same cause for lo these many. =3D20

(As I was born in the Depression, my parents could afford only one L for =
=3D
my name. You are too kind, John.)



Lili Krakowski
Be of good courage

Snail Scott on wed 28 apr 10


On Apr 28, 2010, at 2:31 PM, lili krakowski wrote:
> I think we mislead neophytes with labels like c.6 or c.10, and I
> prefer books where glazes are listed as within a range, (low temp,
> mid-temp, high temp) or by family (as Behrens does in "Glaze
> Projects." )


When I teach, I never call a substance an 'underglaze'.
I may call something an engobe, meaning that it is not
just runny clay and colorant (slip), but isn't a glaze either.
It is defined by what it's made of, and by what it's not.
As for whether you put it under a glaze, over a glaze,
all by itself, or on the wall, that's your own business.
Don't let some corporate drone label-maker tell you how
to use the material just because they think you oughtta
use it as an underglaze. Question authority!

Recipes don't look quite so authoritative as a product label,
but people are still prone to accept what they're told,
not just about the properties of the substance but how
they ought to use it. Too often, that's all they want to know.

I've known a lot of smart people who never dreamed
that you could use an underglaze in any manner except
underneath a glaze, all because they bought a jar that
was identified by a suggested use instead of a description.

And my mid-range engobe might just be your dandy ^10
glaze. Ha! The Ceramics Police will never catch me!

-Snail

Monica Wright on wed 28 apr 10


I was always taught that a cone 6 mat glaze is nothing but a cone 10 gloss =
=3D
glaze not fired high enough.=3DA0 Made sense to me.=3DA0 Not sure if that w=
as o=3D
ff topic or not.=3DA0 Oh well.=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A____________________=
____________=3D
=3D0AFrom: Snail Scott =3D0ATo: Clayart@LSV.CERA=
MICS=3D
.ORG=3D0ASent: Wed, April 28, 2010 5:26:27 PM=3D0ASubject: Re: Cone 6 glaze=
s=3D0A=3D
=3D0AOn Apr 28, 2010, at 2:31 PM, lili krakowski wrote:=3D0A> I think we mi=
slea=3D
d neophytes with labels=3DA0 like c.6 or c.10, and I=3D0A> prefer books whe=
re g=3D
lazes are listed as within a range, (low temp,=3D0A> mid-temp, high temp) o=
r =3D
by family (as Behrens does in "Glaze=3D0A> Projects." )=3D0A=3D0A=3D0AWhen =
I teach,=3D
I never call a substance an 'underglaze'.=3D0AI may call something an engo=
be=3D
, meaning that it is not=3D0Ajust runny clay and colorant (slip), but isn't=
a=3D
glaze either.=3D0AIt is defined by what it's made of, and by what it's not=
.=3D
=3D0AAs for whether you put it under a glaze, over a glaze,=3D0Aall by itse=
lf, =3D
or on the wall, that's your own business.=3D0ADon't let some corporate dron=
e =3D
label-maker tell you how=3D0Ato use the material just because they think yo=
u =3D
oughtta=3D0Ause it as an underglaze. Question authority!=3D0A=3D0ARecipes d=
on't l=3D
ook quite so authoritative as a product label,=3D0Abut people are still pro=
ne=3D
to accept what they're told,=3D0Anot just about the properties of the subs=
ta=3D
nce but how=3D0Athey ought to use it. Too often, that's all they want to kn=
ow=3D
.=3D0A=3D0AI've known a lot of smart people who never dreamed=3D0Athat you =
could =3D
use an underglaze in any manner except=3D0Aunderneath a glaze, all because =
th=3D
ey bought a jar that=3D0Awas identified by a suggested use instead of a des=
cr=3D
iption.=3D0A=3D0AAnd my mid-range engobe might just be your dandy ^10=3D0Ag=
laze. =3D
Ha!=3DA0 The Ceramics Police will never catch me!=3D0A=3D0A=3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA=
0 =3DA0 =3DA0 =3D
=3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA0 =3DA0 -Snail=3D0A

John Hesselberth on wed 28 apr 10


On Apr 28, 2010, at 7:56 PM, Monica Wright wrote:

> I was always taught that a cone 6 mat glaze is nothing but a cone 10 =3D
gloss glaze not fired high enough. Made sense to me. Not sure if that =3D
was off topic or not. Oh well.

Hi Monica,

Unfortunately, some are. That is not the correct or best way to make a =3D
cone 6 matte. It will very likely be unstable and not very durable in =3D
use. Cone 6 matte glazes can be made that are just as stable as cone 10 =3D
glazes--you just have to know what you are doing to formulate them. But =3D
if your teachers are teaching you that is the correct way to make a =3D
cone 6 matte glaze, get a new teacher.

Regards,

John

Monica Wright on wed 28 apr 10


No.=3DA0 Not taught to formulate them that way or to even find them that wa=
y =3D
in a book.=3DA0 Just kind of a generic way of understanding them.=3DA0 A gl=
oss =3D
glaze that doesn't fully melt is a semi-gloss.=3DA0 A little cooler it is a=
s=3D
emi mat.=3DA0 Cooler still and it is a mat glaze.=3DA0 A lot more to it tha=
n th=3D
at but a base glaze will very often be similar to what i said -as far as te=
=3D
xture... but not always.=3DA0 No way i would make that a rule to live by th=
ou=3D
gh.=3DA0 Fun to test though.=3D0A=3D0AThe same goes for dropping a cone 10 =
glaze =3D
down to cone 6 by just substituting neph sy for custer feldspar.=3DA0 It "c=
an=3D
" work but don't count on it all the time.=3DA0 Val Cushing wrote some stuf=
f =3D
on that subject.=3DA0 Once again... fun to test.=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A=3D0A__=
____________=3D
__________________=3D0AFrom: John Hesselberth =3D0=
ATo:=3D
Monica Wright ; Clayart =3D
>=3D0ASent: Wed, April 28, 2010 7:44:16 PM=3D0ASubject: Re: Cone 6 glazes=
=3D0A=3D0A=3D
=3D0AOn Apr 28, 2010, at 7:56 PM, Monica Wright wrote:=3D0A=3D0A> I was alw=
ays ta=3D
ught that a cone 6 mat glaze is nothing but a cone 10 gloss glaze not fired=
=3D
high enough.=3DA0 Made sense to me.=3DA0 Not sure if that was off topic or=
not=3D
.=3DA0 Oh well.=3D0A=3D0AHi Monica,=3D0A=3D0AUnfortunately, some are. That =
is not the=3D
correct or best way to make a cone 6 matte. It will very likely be unstabl=
=3D
e and not very durable in use. Cone 6 matte glazes can be made that are jus=
=3D
t as stable as cone 10 glazes--you just have to know what you are doing to =
=3D
formulate them. But if your teachers are teaching you that=3DA0 is the corr=
ec=3D
t way to make a cone 6 matte glaze, get a new teacher.=3D0A=3D0ARegards,=3D=
0A=3D0AJ=3D
ohn

Maurice Weitman on wed 28 apr 10


Snail Scott wrote:
>I may call something an engobe, meaning that it is not
>just runny clay and colorant (slip)

I'm sure Edouard is sleeping (slipping), or he=3D20
would have been the foist to tell you that=3D20
"engobe" means "slip" en fran=3DE7ais.

>Question authority!

Says who????

Regards,
Maurice

Snail Scott on thu 29 apr 10


On Apr 28, 2010, at 6:56 PM, Monica Wright wrote:

> I was always taught that a cone 6 mat glaze is nothing but a cone 10
> gloss glaze not fired high enough. Made sense to me...


I'd call it a vitreous engobe. myself. A good
matte glaze is (IMHO) a microcrystalline matte,
that is, fully vitrified (melted) but matte because
of crystallization during cooling. An underfired
gloss glaze will be matte due to insufficient melt,
but it won't be a good glaze. It might still be an
excellent surface for some purpose or another,
but not as a glaze. My definition: if it's not melted,
it's an engobe. Happy to use it as an engobe,
though.

A 'matte glaze' which is merely underfired (aka
engobe) is a poor choice for almost any pottery
purpose, but has lots of sculptural potential.
For functional ware, hold out for true matte glazes
with full melt, and thus good likelihood of stability
and durability.
-Snail

Snail Scott on thu 29 apr 10


On Apr 28, 2010, at 9:01 PM, Maurice Weitman wrote:
> I'm sure Edouard is sleeping (slipping), or he would have been the =3D20
> foist to tell you that "engobe" means "slip" en fran=3DE7ais...



Yes, this is true. English is prone to using words
of foreign origin to pad out the nuances of native-
grown words (which may have been foreign once
as well.) As a linguistics prof I know is constantly
saying, though, etymology is interesting, but not
necessarily relevant to current meaning.

Love the French for that - always ready to supply
us with a new shiny word for an old worn-out thing.
Those Anglo-Saxon-derived words are just so
frumpy!

We've discussed 'what is a slip' before, and I agree
that any gloppy-to-runny type of ceramic substance
can be called a slip on that basis, but the term is
generally reserved for concoctions made solely or
mainly of clay, with or without colorants. Engobe
tends to imply other properties or additives, but really,
the line (fuzzy though it is) is mainly between glaze
(fully vitrified) and everything else, whether termed
a slip or engobe.

-Snail

Randall Moody on thu 29 apr 10


I never knew there was this much confusion over glaze firing temps. In my
very first class on pottery it was explained that "^10 glaze" meant that th=
e
glaze matured at ^10. It was later on that I learned about the chemistry of
glazes, how the glaze reacts to the body etc.





--Randall in Atlanta--
http://wrandallmoody.com/home.html

Dolita Dohrman on thu 29 apr 10


I totally agree with Snail here. I have Cone 6 glazes that are matte
due to the slow cooling cycle I use. And all this talk about 'no
such thing as Cone 6 glazes...if it fires perfectly at that
temperature and over-fires or under-fires at any other temperature,
then it is a Cone 6 glaze. Just like there are Cone 6 clays that
vitrify at that temperature. Semantics be damned....
Dolita in Kentucky

On Apr 29, 2010, at 7:47 AM, Snail Scott wrote:

> On Apr 28, 2010, at 6:56 PM, Monica Wright wrote:
>
>> I was always taught that a cone 6 mat glaze is nothing but a cone 10
>> gloss glaze not fired high enough. Made sense to me...
>
>
> I'd call it a vitreous engobe. myself. A good
> matte glaze is (IMHO) a microcrystalline matte,
> that is, fully vitrified (melted) but matte because
> of crystallization during cooling. An underfired
> gloss glaze will be matte due to insufficient melt,
> but it won't be a good glaze. It might still be an
> excellent surface for some purpose or another,
> but not as a glaze. My definition: if it's not melted,
> it's an engobe. Happy to use it as an engobe,
> though.
>
> A 'matte glaze' which is merely underfired (aka
> engobe) is a poor choice for almost any pottery
> purpose, but has lots of sculptural potential.
> For functional ware, hold out for true matte glazes
> with full melt, and thus good likelihood of stability
> and durability.
> -Snail